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Thinkers 50 Innovation: Breakthrough Thinking to Take Your Business to the Next Level (Business Books) Paperback – 1 Nov 2013

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  • Thinkers 50 Innovation: Breakthrough Thinking to Take Your Business to the Next Level (Business Books)
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  • Thinkers 50 Strategy: The Art and Science of Strategy Creation and Execution (Business Books)
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  • Thinkers 50: Future Thinkers: New Thinking on Leadership, Strategy and Innovation for the 21st Century (Business Books)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education; 1 edition (1 Nov. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0071827811
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071827812
  • Product Dimensions: 14.2 x 1 x 21.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,673,891 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

About the Author

The founders and directors of Thinkers50, Stuart Crainer and Des Dearlove, have more than 30 years of experience as business journalists, editors, authors and ghost writers.  Former columnists to The Times, their work has appeared in newspapers and magazines worldwide. Their books are available in more than 20 languages and they remain frequent contributors to The Times, Across the Board and many other publications.

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Format: Paperback
This is one of the volumes in a series published by McGraw-Hill Education and co-authored by Stuart Crainer and Des Dearlove. They wrote it in response to that question.

I really like the basic concept: Crainer and Dearlove selected a major business subject such as leadership and then asked, "Which cutting edge thinkers should we consult to share their thoughts about this?" They had already read their books and articles and even interviewed several of them. A generous selection of the most valuable material they obtained is provided in this volume. The first chapter is called, appropriately, "How We Got Here." That is, how perspectives on innovation have evolved over time.

Here is one of the Q&As from an interview of Clay Christensen:

C&D: What exactly is disruptive innovation?

CC: Disruptive innovation has a very specific meaning. It is not a breakthrough innovation that makes good products a lot better. It has a very specific definition, and that is that it transforms a product that historically was so expensive and complicated that only a few people with a lot of money and a lot of skill had access to it. A disruptive innovation makes the product so much more affordable and acceptable that a much larger population has access to it.

And so it creates new markets. But the technology leaders who made the complicated, expensive stuff find it very hard to move in the direction of the affordable and simple because that is so incompatible with their business model. And so it's almost a paradox within itself. But what it says is, if you are a little boy and want to kill a giant, the way you do it is by going after this kind of product, where the leader is actually motivated to walk away from you rather than engage you.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good topics and good interviews 5 Jan. 2015
By Wayne A McCoy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
'Thinkers 50 Innovation: Breakthrough Techniques to Take Your Business to the Next Level' takes a hot business topic and interviews some of the leaders in the field as determined by the Thinkers 50 thinktank. I found it an interesting read, and see where it could be beneficial to businesses.

Each chapter takes a topic, then interviews a thought leader in that topic. Topics include Leading Innovation, Co-creating the Future and Where Innovation Meets Society. Thought leaders include Don Tapscott, Clay Christensen and Gary Hamel among others. The book is designed as an overview of the current state of innovation and why we are where we are. While not providing a complete roadmap, I think the chapters would be helpful for any company leader looking to add and lead with innovation. Also useful is the changing shape of management and how managers need to evolve in leading their teams.

The interviews are question and answer and are interesting due to the weight most of the leaders provide. The outline of the book is good and I enjoyed reading it. I've read good and bad books on the subject of innovation. This one falls slightly above average in that group. I'd recommend giving it a read if you are looking to drive innovation in your company.

I received a review copy of this ebook from McGraw-Hill Professional and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.
5.0 out of 5 stars How does an organization establish and/or strengthen a capability for discontinuous innovation? 19 May 2015
By Robert Morris - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is one of the volumes in a series published by McGraw-Hill Education and co-authored by Stuart Crainer and Des Dearlove. They wrote it in response to that question.

I really like the basic concept: Crainer and Dearlove selected a major business subject such as innovation and then asked, "Which cutting edge thinkers should we consult to share their thoughts about this?" They had already read their books and articles and even interviewed several of them. A generous selection of the most valuable material they obtained is provided in this volume. The first chapter is called, appropriately, "How We Got Here." That is, how perspectives on innovation have evolved over time.

* * *

Here is one of the Q&As from an interview of Clay Christensen:

C&D: What exactly is disruptive innovation?

CC: Disruptive innovation has a very specific meaning. It is not a breakthrough innovation that makes good products a lot better. It has a very specific definition, and that is that it transforms a product that historically was so expensive and complicated that only a few people with a lot of money and a lot of skill had access to it. A disruptive innovation makes the product so much more affordable and acceptable that a much larger population has access to it.

And so it creates new markets. But the technology leaders who made the complicated, expensive stuff find it very hard to move in the direction of the affordable and simple because that is so incompatible with their business model. And so it's almost a paradox within itself. But what it says is, if you are a little boy and want to kill a giant, the way you do it is by going after this kind of product, where the leader is actually motivated to walk away from you rather than engage you.

* * *

Here is another Q&A, from their interview of C.K. Prahalad:

C&D: What would be an example of co-creation?

CKP: Let's take Google. But if I look at Google, it does not tell me how to use the system. I can personalize my own page; I can create iGoogle. I decide what I want. Google is an experience platform. Google understands that it may have a hundred million consumers, but each one can do what he or she wants with its platform. That is an extreme case of personalized, co-created value. Our shorthand for it is "N=1."

On the other hand, Google does not produce the content at all. The content comes from a large number of people around the world -- institutions and individuals. Google aggregates it and makes it available to me. That is the spirit of co-creation, which says that even if you have a hundred million consumers, each consumer experience is different because it is co-created by that customer and the organization, in this case Google. So resources are not contained within the firm, but accessed from a wide variety of institutions; therefore, resources are global. Our shorthand for that is "R=G," because resources are now coming from more than one institution.

So, N+1 and R=G are going to be the pattern for the future.

Other thought leaders who contributed to this volume include Teresa Amabile, Henry Chesbrough, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Vijay Govindarajan (Q&A), Gary Hamel (Q&A), Linda Hill, Ionnis Ioannou, Constantinos Markides (Q&A), Procter & Gamble, Berndt Schmitt (Q&A), and Don Tapscott (Q&A).

Those who share my high regard for this book are urged to check out the Thinkders50 volumes on management, leadership, future thinkers, and strategy. Also, Crainer's The Ultimate Business Library: The Greatest Books That Made Management, published by Captone/A Wiley Imprint, and The Management Century: One Hundred Years of Thinking and Practice, part of the J-B BAH Strategy & Business Series.

I also greatly admire Dearlove's The Ultimate Book of Business Thinking: Harnessing the Power of the World's Greatest Business Ideas and Business the Richard Branson Way: 10 Secrets of the World's Greatest Brand Builder (Big Shots Series).
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