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97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts by [Monson-Haefel, Richard]
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97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts Kindle Edition

2.9 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

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Length: 222 pages

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Product Description

Book Description

Collective Wisdom from the Experts

About the Author

Richard Monson-Haefel , an independent software developer, coauthored all five editions of Enterprise JavaBeans and Java Message Service (all O'Reilly). He's a software architect specializing in multi-touch interfaces and a leading expert on enterprise computing. More detail on his work and writings can be found at www.monson-haefel.com.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 4517 KB
  • Print Length: 222 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (5 Feb. 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0026OR30S
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #281,058 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is *not* a book by Richard Monson-Haefel but rather a collection of short and content-light pieces by a number of different writers you've probably never heard of. Indeed the pieces would be too short to even qualify as a magazine article.

Each 'chapter' is typically three, short, paragraphs of bland generalisation. Introducing each 'chapter' is a piece of fluff about the writer (think mini-CV crossed with an advert) which is often a significant fraction of the 'chapter'. And where the same writer has authored more than one chapter the fluff about him is repeated.

A very, very high noise to signal ratio and what signal there is is of very low quality.

Avoid.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
You can't judge a book by its cover but you can certainly ask questions about its title. Why '97 things every Software Architect should know'? Why not 98, 99 or even 100? Well the word on infoq ([....]) is that they wanted a number near 100 so that there would be enough material for a reasonably sized book. Fair enough so... The book contains 97 articles published by a range of software professional expressing their views on various aspects of software architecture. Many of the articles are not very technical in nature and there are - perhaps - a lot of similarities between this book and '12 Essential Skills for Software Architects' where author Dave Hendricksen focusses on non-technical skills essential to be a succseful architect. Other articles probably aren't just things an Architect should know but really things anyone working in Software Engineering could benefit from knowing and thinking about. I even include Project Managers in that!

That said, there are some really enjoyable bits and pieces. My favourite parts:
* Keith Braithwaite's reminding of the architect's need to quantify things. Characteristics such as average response
time should be not be phrased using terms such as 'good' or 'satifactory' but quantified as something like:
'between 750ms and 1,250ms'

* Craig Russell's points about including the human interaction time in any performance analysis. The system
may respond very fast to API calls, but the if the UI is counter-intuitive, it means the user will spend a longer time try to
get his result.

* Michael Nygard advice for engineering the 'white spaces'. Don't just have arrows between components specifying the
communication protocol, describe the performance expectation of interaction e.g.
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Format: Paperback
97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know is a book about things which are obvious and every software architect should know, remember and employ. The problem is that most things you can find inside the book are easily forgotten, underestimated and usually not implemented during day-to-day work.

The book consists of 97 short essays. Each of them deals with a vital problem software architects often have to face. Although there are great number of brilliant stories in the book I especially like the one titled: You're Negotiating More Often Than You Think, which is about a project sponsor wanting to cut down expenses. Does it sound familiar to you? Do you know what to do when it happens? The book is a collective work which makes it even more valuable.

Every day in the morning I start my work reading 1-3 essays to keep good practices in my memory and not forget management pitfalls lying in wait for me round the corner. I believe it helps me to become a better software architect. This book is a great and rare opportunity to learn from real experts in the field.
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Format: Paperback
A complete rubbish not fitting into any skill level. The short articles feel like some autogenerated text or excerpts from people blogs you never heard of. Complete waste of time, just like the rest of the books from "97 things every ... Should know".
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Format: Paperback
The articles in the book are very short. I read three or four when booting up my machine on the morning.
These aren't the type of article that will give you a detailed insight into a topic, example: stand up when talking in a meeting. However, they are good tips for performing better in your job.
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Format: Paperback
This book is a good collection of small blog entries or essays if you will. Nearly all of these are good reminders of what is essentially good thinking or practice for a software architect. They range from down to earth technical advices to overall process and collaboration and roles, to the philosophical guiding points of software architecture. Some of them may even seem or are self contradicting, but this only highlights the importance of taking context into account when you make decisions based on some of the condensed principles or learned knowledge of this book.

I find it particular interesting to be able to go back to a topic or subject in one of the essays and find the arguments for some considerations that's suddenly imperative for a decision you need to make now or communicate to somebody. The book is perfect for looking up or revisiting a subject when you need it. The titles of the essays are in most cases small soundbites or reminders of the subject in themselves, making it possible to quickly refresh a point made somewhere in a certain context.

I am a system/software developer, and some of the essays are a bit too philosophical to my taste, but fortunately those essays are in the extreme minority. I have enough experience to recognize a genuine experience or knowledge born out of practical expediency when I see it, and most of the essays in this book are of this kind.

Sure, I could just maintain a bunch of links to the relevant websites that substantiates the same essays, but having them collected in a book, easily accessible, is suitable for this kind of knowledge: These essays are nearly timeless in their advices and suggestions.

It's easy to go read a handful of the essays in 15 minutes or there about.
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