Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Thing Around Your Neck (unabridged audio book) Audio CD – Audiobook, Unabridged

4.4 out of 5 stars 162 customer reviews

See all 15 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio Download, Unabridged
"Please retry"
Audio CD, Audiobook, Unabridged
"Please retry"

Man Booker International Prize 2017
A Horse Walks Into a Bar has won the Man Booker International Prize 2017. Learn more
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Customers also viewed these available items
click to open popover

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Audio CD: 7 pages
  • Publisher: Whole Story Audio Books; Unabridged audio book. edition (8 Jan. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1407439669
  • ISBN-13: 978-1407439662
  • Product Dimensions: 15.4 x 2.6 x 14.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (162 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,793,107 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

There is an understated beauty to Adichie's deceptively simple prose. --Metro

A major new African voice. --The Independent

A fiction writer of exceptional talent. --The Telegraph

About the Author

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was born in Nigeria in 1977. Her first novel ‘Purple Hibiscus’ was published in 2003 and was longlisted for the Booker Prize. Her second novel ‘Half of a Yellow Sun’ won the 2007 Orange Prize for Fiction. Her short story collection, ‘The Thing Around Your Neck’, was published to critical acclaim in 2009. Her work has been selected by the Commonwealth Broadcasting Association and the BBC Short Story Awards, has appeared in various literary publications, including Zoetrope and The Iowa Review. She won a MacArthur ‘genius’ grant in 2009, and in 2010 appeared on the New Yorker’s list of the best 20 writers under 40. Her third novel, ‘Americanah’, was published to widespread critical acclaim in 2013. ‘Half of a Yellow Sun’ is now a major feature film, ‘Americanah’ is in production. She lives in Nigeria.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A lovely delicious short story collection. I love everyone of them. A great get away head space book. Relax and enjoy
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Much appreciated as a present for my friend. A great purchase.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My husband wanted this book he could not put it down
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Lovely book
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Beautifully written, poignant and as good as anything I have read this year. She really is a talented writer. Can't wait for the next one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good book!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The second time I picked the book up I was ready to continue reading til the end. These stories, so similar to a charm bracelet of amulets and charms against ill fortune, are stories of power struggle and soul destroying secrets. As the jacket cover states, they are stories about what binds men and women, institutions and the citizens they are supposed to represent, parents and their children. The calmness of voice, perceptive rendering of the people on the scene, is startling. I was confused and disoriented with the mother of the murdered son as she stood in line. I was the girl ready to do ANYthing to survive in a large and discriminatory family. I shuffled along the dusty streets as a retired professor, almost picking up sand to ward off a ghost. The Big Men are similar to 'big'men I have run into throughout my life in the West. The innuendos backing women into corners of life are rampant everywhere, a universal threat to women and those who are disenfranchised. She keeps the language light to hold the heavy issues at hand. I do not feel the Edward was a strawman as suggested by other reviewers. I did, though, find some stories seemed like chapters of books that have not been written, yet. These ended with a sense of incompleteness. On the other hand, some held names familiar to us who have read some of her other works: town names, Harrison as househelp, among some. Adichie is able to capture the complexity and disorientation that comes with being an expat. How what seems a given in a country is totally strange in another: we carry our countries inside us, our memes are activated to assess all that is new around us. The desperation inherent in leaving a place called 'home' no matter how hard it has treated you hangs from every paragraph.Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
These twelve short stories are written by the author of ‘Purple Hibiscus’ and ‘Half a Yellow Sun’. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has a great deal of experience in this form, being shortlisted in 2002 for the Caine Prize for her short story ‘You in America’, being a joint winner of the BBC Short Story Award in 2003 for ‘That Harmattan Morning’, winning the O. Henry Prize in 2003 for ‘The American Embassy’, which is included in this book, and winning this prize again in 2010, winning the 2002-03 David T. Wong International Short Story Prize (PEN Center Award) and a 2007 Beyond Margins Award for her short story ‘Half of a Yellow Sun’.

With the exception of ‘Ghosts’, the narrators are all female. ‘Ghosts’, which begins ‘Today I saw Ikenna Okoro, a man I had long thought was dead.’, describes a meeting between a retired mathematics professor and a former colleague who emigrated to Sweden after the Biafran war. The professor remembers returning to Nsukka, where the author’s family lived, after the war ‘The lumps of calcified feces in the bathtub were strewn with pages of my Mathematical Annals, used as toilet paper, crusted smears blurring the formulas I had studied and taught.’

The title story describes the life of a Nigerian girl whose ‘uncle’ submits her name in the American visa lottery and, after her name is selected, he welcomes her to New York by buying ‘a big hot dog with yellow mustard that nauseated’ her and expects his reward ‘If you let him, he would do many things for you. Smart women did it all the time.’ She refuses, works as a waitress in a little town in Connecticut, ‘the last stop of the Greyhound bus’, meets a white American boy, and feels the force of the public reactions from black and white communities, excepting her boyfriends’ parent.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category