Buy Used
£4.99
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

There are Little Kingdoms: Stories by Kevin Barry Paperback – 29 Oct 2007

4.8 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback, 29 Oct 2007
£5.88 £4.99
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Stinging Fly Press; 2nd Revised edition edition (29 Oct. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0955015294
  • ISBN-13: 978-0955015298
  • Product Dimensions: 19.3 x 12.7 x 1.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 253,743 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Synopsis

A collection of 13 short stories.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
12
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 15 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Skilful portraits of small drab Irish towns and their inhabitants, places where streets are 'woeful', the surrounding hills 'morbid' and skies 'dishwater'.
Characters overly familiar perhaps: drinkers, talkers, singers, fighters, dreamers, chancers: 'fine specimens of fear and bile and broken sleep'.
There are quiet country pubs and desperate farms and collapsing old houses. There is drizzle and general damp. There are old fellas. There is stout; 'the rush and mingle of the brown and cream notes, and the blackness rising, a magic show you would never tire of.'
The language is vernacular and the dialogue comic: 'You're like the auld farmer hitting off to a matchmaking festival. He's had the first bath of the year. He has the hair slicked back with strong tea. He's dragged a comb through his teeth...and he's set the hens on automatic.'
The mood is melancholic, resigned, regretful: 'The years come in, the years go out. The longer you'd sit and look at it, the life of the town would contract to almost nothing, to the merest glimpse of life, the tiniest crack of light against the black.'
Men long for a fine tenor voice and girls for keys to cars.
We're in Ireland all right. Oh yes indeed, sor. That violent, sentimental, feckless land mythologised by countless writers over the centuries. Barry's version is slightly O'Disneyfied: no internet, mobiles, politics. In pictures, the author wear a battered brown hat. His prose and turn of phrase steer these stories away from cliche (though one character does actually say 'To be sure, to be sure', and eejits abound) though he never ventures towards the true despair of Beckett. His future-set novel, 'City of Bohane' seems to be an interesting way forward.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I have now re read this book three times and I enjoy it more and more with each reading. Beautifully written with wonderful characters, this book is simpy stunning. One of the best and most enjoyable books I have read in a long, long time. I cannnot wait for the next collection.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book has been one of the most rewarding and satisfying reads I have had in many years. The characters of the stories come to life in front of you thanks to the author's talent at finding that part of human nation we all share - the fraility of our own existence. The descriptions of Ireland are truly sublime. There is one story wherein a character plays pool and the way the author describes the action is just the best ever. I look forward to reading more from Kevin Barry again.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
loved this, a wonderful collection of short stories, mostly set in small town Ireland.
He has a great turn of phrase and describes the settings and landscapes brilliantly - afternoons are feeble, people have furious eyebrows, you could be on the expressway bus trundling through the damp Tipp countryside.

I used to love his Examiner column and hoped that this book wouldn't disappoint and happily it didn't.

One to go back to.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The other reviewers have said most of it! This author writes up a storm in a few elegant and sometimes quaint sentences. Most stories are only 10 or so pages long, and capture a world. My out-and-out favourite is called Breakfast Wine and rewards re-reading. Which I did thrice. The humour is bubbling along always, as is the melancholy. I was sorry to finish this, and I've read City of Bohane already. Hurry up and write another book, Mister!
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a wonderful book, maybe Barry's best (among equals) but I drop a star for this Graywolf edition because of the tiny print size. I'll have to wait for a sunny day to re-read a book which I first read with a normal type-face.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This collection of short stories by Irish author Kevin Barry provides the rare combination of something beautifully written and highly entertaining. Poignant, wistful and at times hysterically funny, it has treasures on every page. The author has a talent for capturing the rhythms, slang and charming turns of phrase that are somehow unique to the particular brand of English spoken in Ireland, and the enjoyment of that alone is reason enough to read it. Be warned, though, Barry's characters are not pulled from the cast of "Waking Ned Devine." They are authentic, small-town strugglers and sinners, and their lives are portrayed accordingly, in lovingly vivid detail.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
On a limited number of occasions in my life I have been reading a novel or short story and realised the perfection of the author's description by recognising the place and atmosphere from my own experience. This happened as I read "Atlantic City", the first story in Kevin Barry's award winning collection, "There are Little Kingdoms".

This first story is typical of the majority of pieces in this book; it captures the very essence of its location; it portrays the characters in a vivid reality; it uses the real language of the people involved.

Atlantic City describes the activities, characters and conversations in a makeshift amusement arcade, or more accurately a shed with a pool table and a couple of pin-ball machines in a small rural town. I was very struck by this story as I have spent many hours in just such an establishment and Barry managed to capture the place, its atmosphere and its characters perfectly.

In most of the stories that follow Barry uses the same skill to present the reader with accurate vignettes of life, mostly in Ireland. He describes the location, captures the atmosphere, uses accurate language, and brings real characters to life. His writing is so realistic I could almost name some of the characters in his stories from my own life.

I didn't feel the last two stories were as strong as the eleven preceding tales, but that does not take away from the power of this marvellous little book of stories.

Kevin Barry won the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature on the basis of this collection. He then went on to write a novel, "The City of Bohane". I have read and enjoyed his novel, and it was based on my experience with this novel that I sought out the author's collection of short stories. His name has been added to the list of writers whose work I will read as soon as it becomes available.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback