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Game Theory for Applied Economists Hardcover – 30 Aug 1992

5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (30 Aug. 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691043086
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691043081
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 15.9 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,625,727 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

"Lucid and detailed introduction to game theory in an explicitly economic context."--Cooperative Economic News Service

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I've worked with a handful of game theory books till now, and this one is by far the best. It helps to know some maths (as opposed to the book by Osborne which has much less math, but is much less readable nonetheless), but don't let this frighten you - this book uses examples all the way and is very easy to follow for the beginner.

The one annoying thing is that there are no solutions to the many problems provided, which would be a great help to the student. Apart from this nuisance, this book is highly recommended.

The reader should be aware that this is the American version, and that the same book is published in Europe as "A Primer in Game Theory". As far as I know there is no difference beyond title and cover.
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Format: Paperback
It provides good introduction and basic concepts in Game Theory. Lots of interesting classical examples are given. It is a must for all beginners with mathematic background.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very clear book with clear examples that helps me a lot to understand Game Theory
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Format: Paperback
Mas-Collel et alia, Fudenberg & Tirole, Myerson Rubinstein & Osborne have to do a lot of work to write a Game theory book as good as this one!!. Only Kreps and perhaps Rasmusen do not write as obscure and incomptehensible as the above cited authors. Anyway, congratulations Robert, you beat them all!!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars 41 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Easy but Entry level 8 Jan. 2016
By Dylan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Easy to read. This is an ENTRY level book to Game Theory, but that is what I wanted. I read it over winter break and it helped lay the foundation for me to ace a PhD level Game Theory course.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating stuff 14 April 2014
By Tai - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I got this book as an accompaniment for a Game Theory class I am taking currently. I enjoyed reading this on the side. It was not as easy to read as my assigned textbook but I felt that it went into greater depth about certain subjects vs. the traditional game theory book.

I would recommend this for Econ majors (such as myself) or those with a particular penchant for Game Theory.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I still enjoy review it from time to time 11 Aug. 2015
By JLbunny - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is was my textbook when I was pursuing my PhD in economics. 7 years after graduating, I still enjoy review it from time to time.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A concise primer for undergrads 11 Mar. 2009
By Trevor Burnham - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a nice book on game theory if you're not very mathematically inclined. It was recommended as a supplementary text for a graduate-level course that I took, and I enjoyed it as such. But for a more thorough introductory text for undergrads, I strongly recommend Osborne's An Introduction to Game Theory. This one is preferable only if you're allergic to rudimentary set theory.
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Error-riddled Kindle Edition 22 April 2012
By Twitchard - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Don't buy the Kindle Edition. The typesetting is horrible, it is impossible to read. What's more, there are typos everywhere, and some of the formulas are incorrect and certainly do not match the original, printed version.

With most mistakes you can puzzle out what the original probably says, but at one point, the author intends to use a cumulative probability function F(x) and then f(x) to denote its derivative, but the Kindle Edition depicts them both capital F(x). I'm a patient man, but that's what prompted me to write this review and warn others away.

Maybe it'll do in a pinch if you really, really hate printed books, but avoid if at all possible.
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