Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £4.99

Save £4.00 (44%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

And Then There Were Nuns: Adventures in a cloistered life by [Christmas, Jane]
Audible Narration
Playing...
Loading...
Paused
Kindle App Ad

And Then There Were Nuns: Adventures in a cloistered life Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£4.99

Length: 306 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Audible Narration:
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration. Add narration for a reduced price of £3.99 after you buy the Kindle book.
Ready

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review

"Her style is equal parts Nora Ephron and Bill Bryson" -- Quill & Quire
"Jane Christmas is, in a word, hilarious. She is definitely up there with Bill Bryson in the genre of funny travel writers." --Kingston-Waterloo Record

"A delightful trip down the road less travelled" --Booklist

About the Author

Jane Christmas is an acclaimed Canadian writer of travel memoirs: Incontinent on the Continent (2009 - aging mother and daughter travel to Italy), and What the Psychic Told the Pilgrim (2007 - "equal parts Nora Ephron and Bill Bryson"; "relentlessly smarter, funnier and holier than thou"). She now lives in London, UK.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1085 KB
  • Print Length: 306 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0745956440
  • Publisher: Lion Books (24 Feb. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00IMG2FTI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #86,638 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Damaskcat HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 19 Jan. 2014
Format: Paperback
Jane Christmas - two ex-husbands, late fifties, grown up children, newly engaged - decides that she must find out whether she actually does have a vocation to be a nun. Fortunately her fiancé understands her dilemma and agrees to wait eighteen months to see whether she really does want to be a nun or not. This book is the result of that eighteen months exploration of her spiritual and emotional life.

Written in a conversational style which made me often think she was sitting next to me telling her story, this is a fascinating and absorbing memoir. I found having started it I couldn't put it down. I have always been interested in religion as a subject and intrigued by nuns and monks after I shed buckets over Rumer Godden's `In This House of Brede' and then moved on to reading Karen Armstrong's autobiography and the various fictional nuns such as Veronica Black's Sister Joan and Alison Joseph's Sister Agnes.

Whether you have any sort of religion, or none, this is a fascinating story of one woman's look at the spiritual life and to my mind it is better than Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Drink, Pray'. Jane Christmas stayed at an assortment of convents and monasteries including Quarr Abbey on the Isle of Wight and the convent of the Holy Paraclete in Whitby.

I was interested to read of her stay at Whitby and her walks along the beach there as I can recall seeing nuns walking along the beach in the 1950s when I went to Whitby. This book is totally fascinating reading and gives a tantalising glimpse into the religious life of both Anglican and Roman Catholic nuns and monks.

I received a free copy of this book for review purposes.
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is ,as you will gather from the blurb, is the story of Jane Christmas. A lady in her fifties with a few ex husbands who decides to investigate her life long yearning for religious life commencing unfortunately at the exact time that her current beau asks her to marry him. He is very understanding and off she goes to "experience" life in three convents and one monastery over an unusually long period. Ostensibly an Anglican our author stays with two Anglican order of sisters and one Catholic monastery and a Catholic convent.

I should, perhaps, have known from the title and should have been certain by the cover design but still I plunged ahead. The sad history of this lady and her avowed self disclosure of religious journey should have been moving I suppose, but no.

Bemused, I looked at the other reviews on Amazon of this book. They fall neatly into two groups. The majority ravers and the minority dissenters. I position myself squarely with the later. This is not a good book.

Why? It feels and reads disingenuously. Another reviewer felt that the author was just gathering information for a new book and spun the story around it. I tend to agree.

Our author starts with an Anglican order of sisters in Canada. Here she muses on the inadequacies of the breadth and diversity of Anglican theology and longs for the dogmatic certainties of Rome. Later in her Roman Catholic stays she rails against that very dogmatism and longs for the Anglican latitude. Then to the Isle of White to stay at Worth Abbey (RC...monks) and St Cecilia's Abbey (RC...Sisters). Here she becomes surprised at the fact that RC sisters adhere to RC dogma (painting a very bleak picture of the sisters in particular ). She is affronted that the good sisters have an age limit of admissions.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I did not have to read all of this to realise that it is a rather warped one-person's-view of the places she visited. Her description of Quarr Abbey and the Guestmaster bear no resemblance to the real place or person, and I speak advisedly, knowing both well. In general, my reaction to her style was to find myself thinking that she was rather self-centered about her "search" and this in itself would make it clear that she has never had a vocation, as the whole idea of having a vocation is that of losing the self and seeking God. It is said (I believe by Thomas Merton) that a person's idea of God tells us more about them than it does about God, and I can think of no better example of the truth of this than this book. I'm glad she has found happiness, but I feel sorry that she wasted her time with this spurious "search". It occurs to me to wonder if her real purpose was simply to get enough material for a book?
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book may have a frivolous title and a cartoon front cover but it is in no way a trivial book. The author has a very engaging and entertaining style but her subject matter is serious. Her journey through several convents raises lots of questions about convents, the people who live in them and the church in general. As a life-long churchgoer myself and used to it's rituals/jargon etc I often wonder what the outside world thinks of it. Jane Christmas is a challenging person and I am looking forward to reading her other books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
SUCH a refreshing read! I love the memoir genre, it's true but this stands out in its class; it not only holds the reader's interest throughout, but it is sensitive, witty and insightful all at once. Why is Jane Christmas not more well-known in the UK? She deserves to be up there at the book festivals and award ceremonies - a first rate modern writer whose ability to capture on the page what most of us only whisper between the closest of friends. You don't need to be highly spiritual or religious to romp through this book with a broad smile on your face, a sense of wonder in your heart and to reach the end wishing for more..... I do hope there will be more where this came from. Read it! You won't be disappointed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover