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Then Like The Blind Man: Orbie's Story by [Owens, Freddie]
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Then Like The Blind Man: Orbie's Story Kindle Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Length: 330 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product description

About the Author

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Freddie Owens is a poet and fiction writer whose work has been published in Poet Lore, Crystal Clear and Cloudy, and Flying Colors Anthology. The author is a past attendee of Pikes Peak Writer's Conferences and the Association of Writers and Writing Programs, and is a current member of Lighthouse Writer's Workshop in Denver, Colorado. As a licensed professional counselor and psychotherapist, he for many years counseled perpetrators of domestic violence and sex offenders, and provided therapies for individuals and families. He holds a master’s degree in contemplative psychotherapy from Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado. Born in Kentucky and raised in Detroit, Owens drew inspiration for his first novel, Then Like The Blind Man / Orbie's Story from childhood experiences growing up around Harlan’s Crossroads, Kentucky. His life-long studies of Tibetan Buddhism and Advaita Vedanta not to mention his encounters with Native American Shamanism are also of note in this regard.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2878 KB
  • Print Length: 330 pages
  • Publisher: Blind Sight Publications (26 Nov. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00A42VK4O
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,280,898 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
Orbie: an outspoken, angry nine-year-old. He knew there would be problems coming the moment his widowed momma, Ruby, remarried Victor, but he was just a kid; no one asked his opinion. When Victor got mad, Orbie described his eyes as “slimy red worms turning over … twisting around on sharp glass, cutting themselves in there and getting mean.” On their trip from Detroit to Florida in the late 1950’s, it was Victor who insisted Orbie would stay with his maternal grandparents in Kentucky. Victor, his mom, and his five-year-old sister, Missy, continued on to Florida where Victor had a job opportunity waiting.

Harlan’s crossroads, KY was located at the foot of the Appalachian Mountains. People there had their own way of life and except for a few of the elites, they were a close-knit bunch. While Orbie was afraid of ‘colored’ kids in Detroit, he came to realize the blacks in Harlan’s Crossroads were much different and his Granny was close friends with Alma, who reminded Orbie of Aunt Jemima. He grew close to his Granny almost immediately, but it took some getting used to his eccentric Granpaw.

The dialog is so well done. I’ve read many where the words of hillbillies or backwoods people were so mutilated, you couldn’t even understand them. That is not the case here. The author also did well staying true to the mind of a nine-year-old boy. The story is his first person account. It’s Orbie’s coming-of-age story with some mystery and justice mixed in. That said, it is not a book for children’s reading. There are language and some situations that would not suit a younger reading level. Freddie Owen skillfully created many wonderful and true-to-life characters in his debut historical fiction novel. Rating: 4 out of 5.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I agree with the product description, if you can call a book a product, that the book is part Hamlet and part Huckleberry Finn. I really enjoyed the boy Orbie's story, while understanding that it had social relevance in that country at that time. It is a story written in the grand southern tradition. I think the author Freddie Owens Wegela really captures the boys feelings and takes the reader with him on his mishaps. I really felt for Orbie and his family and wanted it to come right in the end. It was an interesting mix of family, culture and race, I loved it.
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I agree with the product description, if you can call a book a product, that the book is part Hamlet and part Huckleberry Finn. I really enjoyed the boy Orbie's story, while understanding that it had social relevance in that country at that time. It is a story written in the grand southern tradition. I think the author Freddie Owens Wegela really captures the boys feelings and takes the reader with him on his mishaps. I really felt for Orbie and his family and wanted it to come right in the end. It was an interesting mix of family, culture and race, I loved it.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Finished THEN LIKE THE BLIND MAN this afternoon. One of those books that you just never want to end, swallows you up and deposits you into a whole different world populated with incredible characters. Set in Kentucky in the 50s, the descriptions are outstanding and the narrative from the nine year old Orbie gives the most wonderful perspective on the goings on of the adults around him.
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