Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Audible Sample
Playing...
Loading...
Paused

Them: Adventures with Extremists Audio Download – Unabridged

4.5 out of 5 stars 170 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio Download, Unabridged
"Please retry"
£0.00
Free with your Audible trial

Read & Listen

Switch between reading the Kindle book & listening on the Audible narration with Whispersync for Voice.
Get the Audible audiobook for the reduced price of £3.99 after you buy the Kindle book.
Free with Audible trial
£0.00
Buy with 1-Click
£13.10

Sold and delivered by Audible, an Amazon company


Product details

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I read Jon Ronson's book in an abridged Swedish edition. I expected the book to be comic relief, and it's certainly marketed that way. Instead, I found the book to be disturbing, tragic and (at best) tragicomic. Sometimes, it made me sympathize with the extremists!

The Muslim fundamentalist Omar Bakri may have been a clown, but his antics are less entertaining today, after the London metro bombings (something Ronson also acknowledges in a foreword to the Swedish edition). The attacks on David Icke in Canada raise the question who is more insane: Icke or the people harassing him? As for Randy and Vicki Weaver, they were obviously the victims of a set up, to put it mildly. The paranoid crypto-Nazis who chase the Bilderbergers are disturbing, but so are the Bilderbergers themselves. One of the Bilderbergers, Dennis Healy, doesn't understand what on earth the fuzz is all about when interviewed by Ronson: "Sure we have secret meetings. So what? That's how it works. That's how thing are done".

So that makes it alright, then?

The high point of "Them" is Ronson's successful infiltration of the Bohemian Grove, where he manages to watch the secret ritual and mock sacrifice to the owl god. The "ritual" turns out to be a ridiculous, pseudo-Masonic college fraternity stunt. The thing looks more pathetic than menacing. Indeed, somebody suggests to Ronson that the Bilderbergers might actually *like* all the conspiracy theories about them. It boosts their egos. Today, nobody controls anything anymore.

Perhaps the full-length original version of "Them" is more entertaining. Or perhaps the Swedish translation is to blame?

I don't know, but I walked away from this book more convinced than before that the extremism of the conspiracy theorists is fuelled by the insanity of the real world...
Comment 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
After hearing the media's over-hyped version of things, it was great to read something that puts it all into context. Ronson does the impossible and manages to take a really funny look at conspiracy theories and Islamic fanticism (the bit about the controversial cleric and the choc-ice still makes me laugh).
My only problem with the book is that it storms off brilliantly, moving from one set of extremists to another, but this does not continue throughout the book. Therefore, it's only let down is that the start is so good, that the last half cannot possibly keep the same pace and quality of laughs.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I went straight onto 'Them' having torn through Ronson's brilliant 'The Psychopath Test' and I wish, in a way, I'd read them in the opposite order. This is without doubt a really interesting, and funny book - but it doesn't have the same gut impact of the other title.

Don't get me wrong, Ronson manages once again to portray remarkable people with the same kind of slightly suspect innocence that Louis Theroux uses on TV - so we meet everyone from an Islamic extremist to Ian Paisley, via David Icke - but the writing simply isn't knit together quite as beautifully.

Perhaps part of the problem is that the central theme here is slightly more flaky. What links all these people (and others) is the belief that a 'World Order' of important people meet up and shape all our destinies. The central focus of these beliefs seem to be primarily the Bilderberg Group and a strange American gathering involving giant owls that is more reminiscent of an extended Fraternity party than anything sinister.

Yes, these groups do bring together very important people for networking, but hardly for setting the whole world's agenda - apart from anything else, these groups only meet once a year, hardly enough to run things from day to day. Even so, Ronson's attempts to penetrate these gatherings is itself both funny in its mild incompetence and rather scary.

A good book then, very readable, and a real incite into the way that so many of these fringe people are inspired by the same conspiracy paranoia - but not quite Ronson's best.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
I have been a little hesitant in reviewing the Kindle version of 'Them' as Amazon will, frustratingly, include this review with all versions of the item. I also own the 2002 paperback edition, and found it replicated none of the errors I cross-referenced from the Kindle version. The book itself was a really enjoyable read, mixing investigative journalism with a great deal of humour.
The Kindle version, however, is rather disappointing. I noticed a large number of typing and formatting errors, particularly words pushed together without spaces between them. An accent symbol on a person's name, repeated many times in chapter 11, is presented as (what appears to be) an image rather than actual text. This causes lines containing this name to have huge gaps above and below. Frustratingly, this Amazon review will also not correctly display the accented character! However, I typed the word - with the accent - into a personal document, which I have subsequently viewed as plain text on my Kindle without any problems. It is definitely a character recognised by the Kindle so I have no idea why the publisher has chosen to present the work in this way.
I would not want to imply that the errors in the Kindle edition render it entirely unreadable. However, it does not do justice to Ronson's writing, and I would advise against rewarding the publisher for such a lazy and sloppy conversion into the digital format.
1 Comment 53 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews