Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now

The Wildest Dream 2010

LOVEFiLM By Post

Movies and TV seasons on DVD and
Blu-ray to rent By Post.

Start your 30-day free trial

Receive 4 discs a month for £8.99 or £7.99 for Prime customers.

3.9 out of 5 stars (51) IMDb 7.3/10
LOVEFiLM By Post

Uses astonishing visuals to tell the intersecting stories of George Mallory, the first man to attempt a summit of Mount Everest, and Conrad Anker, the mountaineer who finds Mallory's frozen remains 75 years later.

Starring:
Natasha Richardson, Hugh Dancy
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature parental_guidance
Runtime 1 hour 27 minutes
Starring Natasha Richardson, Hugh Dancy, Liam Neeson, Leo Houlding, Alan Rickman, Conrad Anker, Ralph Fiennes
Director Anthony Geffen
Genres Drama
Studio 2 ENTERTAIN VIDEO
Rental release 12 September 2011
Main languages English
Hearing impaired subtitles English
Discs
  • Feature parental_guidance
Runtime 1 hour 27 minutes
Starring Natasha Richardson, Hugh Dancy, Liam Neeson, Leo Houlding, Alan Rickman, Conrad Anker, Ralph Fiennes
Director Anthony Geffen
Genres Drama
Studio 2 ENTERTAIN VIDEO
Rental release 12 September 2011
Main languages English
Hearing impaired subtitles English

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
If you enjoyed 'Touching the Void (2003)', 'The Beckoning Silence (2007)' or 'The Endurance (2000)', then you will love this. Narrated by Liam Neeson and featuring the voices of Ralph Fiennes, Natasha Richardson and Alan Rickman, this tells the story of George Mallory and Sandy Irvine's ill-fated conquest of Everest in 1924.

The story is told through the eyes of top American Mountaineer Conrad Anker, who in 1999 discovered the body of George Mallory on Everest. He, along with his climbing partner Leo Houlding, are shown attempting to recreate Mallory's route to the peak, starting from Tibet in the north. This involved scaling a dangerous rock formation near the top, the 'Second Step', in the way Mallory and Irving would have had to have done it in 1924, without the aid of the metal ladder attached by Chinese climbers in 1975.

As you would expect the photography is spectacular and the modern day scenes are exhilarating and majestic but it is the account of Mallory's life, featuring rare film footage from the 1924 expedition, that really takes this documentary to the heights. Mallory's letters, read by Ralph Fiennes, show him to be a fascinating character and a deeply passionate man. Although he was obsessed with Everest he was totally devoted to his wife Ruth. The readings of the couple's correspondence are very touching, and are overflowing with passion, love and affection. Ruth's are read beautifully by Natasha Richardson and are given added poignancy by the fact that Natasha tragically died shortly after.

An emotional adventure well worth seeing if you are fascinated by personal sacrifice, courage and endurance, underpinned by deep passion and love.
Comment 47 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I entirely agree with the previous reviewer about the soundtrack.
The music is so loud that the narrator and voices are scarcely audible and entirely incomprehensible.
Anthony Geffen's wonderful film has been ruined.
I have written to 2Entertain about this since there is no point in returning the video to Amazon and getting an identical replacement.
4 Comments 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
The making-of of this film, a one-hour report pretentiously titled "Shooting the impossible", about how they managed to film Conrad Anker's adventure, starts with an early mistake that should warn everybody. The famous photo of the nine members of the Everest's 1924 expedition, in which Irvine & Mallory are respectively first and second from the left in the standing file, in the making-of, both heroes are shown first and second from the right. This is simply because somebody inverted the photo, and amazingly nobody involved in the movie was aware of that. Too bad that there are no letters in that picture: it would look like Russian!
But this is nothing compared with the Potala fiasco. The superb image of this magnificent palace located in Lhasa, the Tibet's capital town, appears not just one time but twice, subtitled "Kathmandu, Nepal". Hooray! It reminds me John Landis's wonderful Kentucky Fried Movie, where they showed always the same view of a city, but changing every-time the underwritten name of it!
At the end of the day it makes me wonder: where they really approaching from the north or the south face of the Everest summit? Went they to Tibet to hire Nepalese Sherpas? Wasn't Mallory & Irvine story enough mysterious?
Finally I am glad to read so many comments quoting the nasty soundtrack. I initially thought it was time to renew my poor DVD player, but no, it's just that it's horrible.
Too bad, such an interesting movie, ruined by the general lack of interest of its creators...
Albert Cadirat
Vilassar de Mar
Catalunya
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Most British heroes of the twentieth century are long forgotten. The story of George Leigh Mallory, however, still fascinates, probably because the question of whether or not he and his climbing partner, Sandy Irvine, reached the summit of Mount Everest before dying will almost certainly never be answered.

This film is superbly photographed, and cleverly intertwines the tale of Mallory and Irvine with that of modern-day climbers Conrad Anker and Leo Houlding, as they retrace - sometimes in period climbing gear - the route of the 1924 expedition. Anker and Houlding cannot, of course, prove that their predecessors made the summit, but they do show that it was possible for them to have free climbed a difficult precipice and thus could well have done so.

I would have given the film five (rather than four) stars, except that the balance of sound on the DVD, particularly during the first half of the film, spoiled my enjoyment. The music is far too loud, so much so that the narration is often nearly impossible to hear clearly, which in a documentary film is a fatal flaw. There were even times when I wished that there had been no background music whatsoever, so that what was being said could have been fully appreciated.

The bonus feature, a documentary about the making of the film, is also well worth watching, not least because it emphasises just what a challenge Everest remains, and also the achievements of all those involved with making the film in such an extreme environment.
1 Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews