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VINE VOICEon 14 March 2006
Egan’s The Skilled Helper is a classic resource, practical and outcome-oriented, for those of us involved in the helping professions (not only counselling but also related fields such as life coaching.) As a student who has mostly been exposed to the Rogerian, client-centred model of counselling, I am interested by Egan’s pragmatic approach, where empathy is not seen to be an end in itself but, in the later stages of the helping process, becomes secondary to the search for desirable outcomes. Egan’s discussion of the "shadow side" of helping, where good intentions can have poor results, is also highly useful.
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on 22 May 2002
Gerard Egan's 3 Stage Model is the cornerstone to all counselling, from Brief Therapy through to Psyhcodynamic work. This is so because all effective counselling first demands that you "get alongside the client", listening, empathising and building up a professional trust and respect. This book is accepted by so many as THE book that builds and teaches the necessary skill foundations for us all, whether professional counsellors, health/care professionals, or simply people who care enough to want to show they care and want to support their friends and family in the best ways possible.
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on 22 May 2003
This book does not need a recommendation from me as it is so well established. For anyone who is involved in "helping people" it is a must. It is full of common sense and wisdom and well as an unrivalled knowledge of the subject
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on 2 May 2015
Good book to have amongst many others as a reference guide if doing a counselling degree. The author states his own position and give a good description of how he sees the integrative model. I found it a bit lifeless and dreary and times. All the info is there but its a slog to read. Buy it to dip in and out of or as a reference guide
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VINE VOICEon 2 June 2010
Language conveys our beliefs, values and expectations to others. Positive words can be uplifting and invigorating, while negative words have the opposite effect. Clearly, verbal communication is multifaceted. Ideally, both the person speaking and the listener will be committed to the process, and the articulation of the message. Power is an aspect of communication that is not always considered. In a work and youth orientated culture,in just one example, older people are often perceived in a negative way.
Using words positively, respecting the other person, and being mindful of the complexities involved in verbal communication, can empower any person, but particularly the most vulnerable in our society. This is the serious side of the words we use. For an example, Fred had just been diagnosed with terminal cancer. He felt confused, bitter, angry and depressed. What would you say to him? `I know how you must feel?'
After some angry confrontations with doctors and members of his family, in his despair Fred finally talked to a clergyman who had, on a few occasions, gently and non-intrusively offered his support. He also referred him to a counsellor who worked in a hospice for the dying. With their help, Fred gradually learned how to manage the ultimate problem situation of his life. He put his affairs in order, began to learn how to say goodbye to his family and the world, and set about the process of managing physical decline. There were setbacks, but generally he managed the process of dying much better than he would have done without the help of his family and his counselors (This example in the book sums up the value of this method).
In a more general sense, some people talk as if they have no control over the outcome of their experiences. Perhaps inadvertently, they see themselves as victims. Conversely, they may fail to recognize that they may be blameless, as abusive relationships are often characterized by the abuser convincing the person that they are to blame, that they are powerless, unable to do anything. Talking the problem through is the first step to the person themselves finding the solution.
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on 2 April 2013
good quality even for second had.

Has been such a good purchase and has helped me understand the model so much further.

would recommend to anyone who comes across Egan's model in any part of life
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on 18 June 2013
Clear, practical and invaluable. Well known and ageless in my opinion. Dip in and out or read cover to cover.
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on 12 February 2012
For anyone who is involved in "helping people" it is a must. It is full of common sense and wisdom and well as an unrivalled knowledge of the subject
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on 10 April 2014
Bought this for my niece for her degree course. She said it was the correct thing and that it worked.
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on 21 June 2016
A very well written book purchased as used. It is in excellent condition and was very good value.
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