Audible Sample
Playing...
Loading...
Paused

The Post-Birthday World Audiobook – Abridged

3.6 out of 5 stars 125 customer reviews

See all 31 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio Download, Abridged, 13 Oct 2009
£0.00
Free with your Audible trial

  • Includes this title for free
  • Choose from 200,000+ titles
  • After 30 days, Audible is £7.99/mth
  • Cancel anytime.
List Price: £11.99
You Save: £1.50 (12%)

Sold and delivered by Audible, an Amazon company


Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 7 hours and 43 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Abridged
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers Limited
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 13 Oct. 2009
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002SQDLWS

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
First things first - this book isn't a sequel to We Need to Talk About Kevin. A fairly obvious point to make, but one that really does need making. Because this seems to be the expectation of many reviews that I have read. Certainly, Kevin is an amazing and poignant book, and if you haven't read it yet, then where the hell have you been? However, as a writer, Shriver has the ability to write about a wide and varied range of subject matter. This is what good writers do. If you really want to learn more on high school massacres, then rent out Bowling for Columbine.

So, if you can get Kevin out of your head for five minutes, then please turn your attention to The Post-birthday World. And this is one novel that really is deserving of your attention. In the first chapter, Irina is faced with a life changing choice: does she stick with her decent, reliable yet slightly dull long-term partner Lawrence, or does she give it all up for a life of passion and unpredictability with hard living and exciting snooker player Ramsey? The book then branches into two; in alternate chapters it shows what happens when Irina leaves Lawrence, and what happens when she stays.

The result is an entrancing read. Now, I'll be the first to admit that snooker is not the sexiest of sports. But, as with Shriver's other sports novel Double Fault, it's almost not what Shriver writes about but the way she writes about it. On paper, her subject content sounds fairly dull; snooker, middle age people falling in love, the politics of Northern Ireland. And yet she still manages to intrigue and draw the reader in, and to make them care. Plus, anyone who is able to take the dull relation of the sports world and make it sound interesting and even a little bit sexy will always get my admiration.
Read more ›
Comment 39 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I bought this because I really enjoyed Lionel Shriver's other novels, so not sure how she could produce something this bad. I took this book on holiday and couldn't even bear to read it to the end while sat on a sunlounger with nothing else to do. From the vapid, heroine to the ungengaging storyline (I honestly couldn't have cared less what she did with her love life) this was awful. But the most gratingly horrible thing by far was the shocking American attempt at Ramsey the snooker player's English vernacular, which was a confusing mix of Dick Van Dyke cockney and a parody of Northern colloquialisms as imagined by a patronising American academic. I don't think anybody in the North speaks like this. Or England. Or the world. And nobody quotes Snooker Loopy quite so often, and without irony. Maybe I am doing this book an injustice and it had a fantastic ending. But I am happy never to find out.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I have enjoyed a bit of Shriver's journalism so thought I ought to give her novels a go, and picked this one because of the Russian links and the London setting and political background. Unfortunately my view of Shriver has probably been coloured by my complete antipathy to her views on Brexit (no Ms Shriver, it was not only rich people who voted Remain - none of my family or friends are rich and we all did, and Europeans do have a sense of humour) and her stupid remarks about gluten allergies (which are often genuine) so this may have biased me against 'The Post Birthday World'. But even taking this aside, I think it is a problematic work.

In fact, it hinges on a reasonably interesting idea (not totally original, it will be recognizable from 'Sliding Doors' and also from Jane Rogers's novel 'Her Living Image', but quite classily handled). Irina, an American children's book illustrator living in London with her partner Lawrence, a terrorism expert for a think tank, ends up going out to dinner with the couple's friend Ramsey Acton, a famous snooker player, to console him after his divorce on his birthday. Lawrence is in Sarajevo at the time but urges Irina to go alone. She and Ramsey enjoy a sumptuous Japanese meal, then go back to his house to enjoy a joint or two. Towards the end of the evening Irina has a powerful urge to kiss Ramsey. At this point the novel splits in two and Shriver gives Irina two optional lives - the life where she kisses Ramsey, goes on to leave Lawrence and marry him and becomes a 'snooker wife'; or the one where she resists temptation, stays with Lawrence and sees Ramsey less and less. Neither will turn out quite how she thinks.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Where some people find love Lionel Shriver's endless reflections on life and the relationships irritating, I love them. I found the protagonist's affection for her live-in partner Lawrence much easier to understand than I did Eva's passion for her one-dimensional husband in "We need to talk about Kevin".
Other reviewers are disgusted by Irina's tendency to live her life around her boyfriend in this book, but it's a trap that many women fall into, well illustrated by the book, as is the financial insecurity that comes from an insecure, poorly paid creative career. It's feminism for people who don't like the word "feminism".
I was very interested to learn that the author married the ex-husband of one of the now-ex-agents who rejected "We need to talk about Kevin". So that's where Jude and Ramsey came from!
However, the author's inexplicable failure to grasp British English really marred my pleasure in this book. Several times Ramsey's ridiculous, cringe-inducing speech tempted me to give up reading, and when I read about things such as going to the loo for shampoo I had to stop short and try to work out what she meant. I'm not from the UK, but it seems easy enough to understand that Britons, while they may not use the US euphemism "going to the bathroom", still call their bathrooms "bathrooms". It was very disappointing to find a writer I admire behaving like the literary equivalent of Keanu Reeves in "Dracula".
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category