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4.6 out of 5 stars
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4.6 out of 5 stars
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on 8 January 2010
THE OPEN ROAD is an excellent example of early colour movies. It was filmed in the improved two-colour BIOCOLOUR system of Friese-Greene and shows the former landscape and towns of England. The colour restauration of this film is very good, no flickering is to be seen. THE OPEN ROAD is a valuable contribution to all DVD collections under historical and technical aspects.
Gert Koshofer, German author on colour cinematography
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on 17 February 2011
Of the 64 minutes of amazing colour films from the British countryside only about 30 minutes are actually photography because half of it are distracting intertitles trying to be funny, often interrupting after every scene, most of the time after every third scene!! You always have to switch between reading and enjoying the view. I wish they had put a second version on the disc omitting all the titles. It's an edit anyway of about three hours of footage.
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on 29 September 2014
Now this is a far superior version, from the BBC TV release of a few years before , even with the very likeable fronting, by Historian Dan Cruikshank. The advantage with the BFI version of ''The Open Road'' is that that august organisation, has gone to great efforts to eradicate the poor colour limitations, and other technical difficulties or this historic film, and made it a more enjoyable experience. There are no interruption's for modern infill and explanations , because the former unwatchable frames have been restored. This doesn't mean there are NO interruption at all, because this is a silent film interspersed with titles and explanations of places in time. The flow is much better, and therefor more enjoyable. P G Croft.
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on 5 March 2014
I chose 'okay' for my review of 'The Open Road' as I saw a copy of this film many years ago on the television. It included clips of Lands End and pictures of a farmer called Mr Eddy.I knew a family called Eddy who owned a farm near Lands End.The original had more film of Cornwall, which is the reason I purchased a copy for myself and my 90 year old Aunt as we are both from Cornwall.
On viewing the newer edition, it seems the scenes about which I was most interested had been edited out.
Having purchased the CD it did say somewhere that the original had been edited, but I did not know that prior to purchasing the DVD and even if it had been stated somewhere, I would not have known it was most of the Cornwall part that was cut out. The DVD is fine. It is just very disappointing on a personal level.
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on 15 May 2014
As many people have said, this is a fascinating glimpse of Britain in the 1920s, and in colour too. As such, you should buy this, if the period interests you, and feel free to ignore the comments below.

There are a couple of things that spoiled it for me, though. Despite the great success in getting rid of the inherent flicker in the original film, there are still weird artifacts when something moves quickly in front of the camera: the fast-moving object becomes two images, one red and one blue-green. Once you've spotted this, you can't help waiting for it to happen again. Also, the colour, though initially pleasant, becomes annoying because it's so determinedly bland and pastel; hand-tinted photographs, for example, tend to be much better than this 'real' colour. I appreciate that no-one wanted to 'correct' the hues here, but in truth it would have made a more effective film.

But what I really dislike is the new music score; it's there all the time, with lots of frantic sawing of the violin and twiddling of the piano, and it's not actually very good.
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on 12 July 2013
An interesting road trip across Britain showing people and places in all their naturalness. Real life in the 1920s period. Originally shot in Friese-Greene Natural Colour but digitally restored, by BFI, to the wonderful presentation it is now. Absolutely amazing!
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on 1 July 2013
I caught a few minutes of this when it was shown on the BBC a few years ago, so was excited to see it released by the BFI. An absolute pleasure and joy to watch and the nearest we'll get to a time-machine!! So glad I bought it and will treasure it for years to come.
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on 17 July 2013
A wonderful glimpse of the past and also a record of the technology that was developed in attempting to produce colour film in the early part of the 20th century. A must for film fans and those interested in history - and film history. Highly recommended.
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on 1 May 2013
I had seen this dvd earlier and just had to have a copy for myself. Gt. Britain as I sort of recall from my childhood, a time of hardship but lower stress levels.
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on 7 November 2014
Bit of 1920's nostalgia very funny (even when not meant to be) but some of the views are very good and it is surprising how much has changed. Even the class divides.
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