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The Neighbors Audio Download – Unabridged

3.3 out of 5 stars 65 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 7 hours and 31 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 27 Nov. 2012
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00AEAUOZM
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By M. Dowden HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 26 Aug. 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I had hopes for this book, reading the blurb it sounded like something that was meaty and a cracking read. In Creekside, a town in Kansas, Andrew Morrison is moving in with an old schoolfriend, who he hasn't seen or spoken to in some time. On a lovely street which seems like an idyll Andrew finds that his friend lives in the only ramshackle house, derelict and looking like it will soon fall down. With the perfect house next door, and the ideal neighbours, things aren't necessarily as they seem.

Where this story starts to unravel though is in that it is so predictable, you know what will happen next, there is no thoughtful engagement between you and the book, it is as simple as 1+1=2. Although well written enough there is nothing to push this above countless other crime fiction/ thrillers, and so you do feel a tad underwhelmed, and in places you have to wonder if it is that believable. To a certain extent suspense has been pushed aside to give you instead 'flashbacks' into the characters' pasts. A quite quick read this is something to sit with in the garden or on the beach, where you are just looking for something to read that is easy and doesn't take much thought.
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By Nikki VINE VOICE on 21 Nov. 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I love a good psychological thriller so I looked forward to reading this book as it sounded right up my street. I was however disappointed as it just didn't hit the mark for me with its rather basic and very predictable plot. I was hoping for a much darker, sinister and intense kind of read - something that would really draw me in and keep me on the edge of my seat but sadly this book failed to do that. I would describe this as a quick and easy read which dosen't require much brain power.
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Format: Paperback
Andrew (Drew) Morrison has literally jumped from the frying pan into the fire in his attempt to escape his agoraphobic, alcoholic mother. Ever since his dad left several years ago, Drew has been the "man of the house" taking care of all the household duties and working in an attempt to hold his meager "family" together. Now he has moved in with his childhood buddy Mickey, whose home and squalid lifestyle are made glaringly more obvious when compared to the manicured lawns, white picket fence and "home and garden" residence of the picture perfect couple residing next door to Mickey. From outward appearances the Wards are the quintessential couple with the smell of fresh baked cookies emanating from their fairytale home. Some may "get their kicks on Route 66" but this particular fairy tale is more the "666" variety. Harlow, the female resident of the house next door is a beautiful but evil enchantress. Her husband, Red, presents a puppy dog attitude of obedient loyalty and turns a blind eye while his little woman blackmails Mickey into joining her as she compulsively engages in acts of incest, torture and murder in an attempt to satiate her need for vengeance. It's almost as if Mickey and Harlow share a mental disorder with her being the manic part of the duo and he the depressive.

So with Mickey keeping his guilty secrets and Drew experiencing some overwhelming feelings of culpability for abandoning his mother, both young men are prime candidates for some inevitable and violent encounters with the wacky Wards.

Less the Blue Velvet/Basic Instinct genre that was advertised in the blurb, this is more "the novice writers' version of Stephen King meets Dean Koontz for an evening at Peter Straubs' home". Not bad, but not great either.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The blurb for The Neighbors describes it as "an insidiously entertaining tale of psychological suspense and mounting terror by the boldest new master of the form, at the intersection of Basic Instinct and Blue Velvet". It's the story of Andrew Morrison, who leaves home after a row with his alcoholic mother, moves into a rundown property with a deeply unpleasant housemate, and finds himself fascinated by Red and Harlow Ward, the strangely glamorous couple next door who seem keen to take him under their wing. To me, this all sounds quite promising.

Unfortunately, The Neighbors simply fails to deliver on pretty much every level.

First of all, Andrew - who is also irritatingly referred to as Drew and Andy throughout, despite the narrative being from a third person omniscient point of view - has little in the way of either depth or backbone. His departure from his mother's home is not especially convincing, and nor is his response to the strange reaction he gets from his new housemate Mickey (sometimes called Mick, which irked me as much as the Andrew/Drew/Andy business) when he arrives after agreeing to move in. He's perturbed by Mickey's incredible rudeness upon his arrival, but fails to confront him about it or even question it, despite Mickey being a old childhood friend. Moreover, his obsession with the Wards simply doesn't seem credible. Admittedly, Andrew might be looking for a mother figure or a family unit, given his background, but I still fail to see why he'd a) develop an erotic fixation with an obviously mad middle-aged woman solely because she's well-groomed and makes him some cookies or b) believe for one moment that a suburban couple could possibly need to pay him to work full-time simply on some low-skilled maintenance jobs around the house.
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