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The Marriage Game Audiobook – Unabridged

3.6 out of 5 stars 128 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 16 hours and 28 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Whole Story Audiobooks
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 24 July 2014
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00LV1K642
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer reviews

Top customer reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
good historical read, oozes atmosphere
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Paperback
Queen Elizabeth favours Robert Dudley, and their affair is the talk of all Europe.Many believe them to be lovers and Elizabeth may not be the virgin queen after all.

My Thoughts:

Alison Weir has to be one of the most respected historical novelists and I have enjoyed some of her books. So what went wrong with this book. I have struggled to read half of it and don't have the heart to continue. I am finding the book so boring.

This book lacks passion. I feel it is very flat and at times it seems I am reading a factual book with dialogue thrown in. For me the relationship between Elizabeth and Dudley is fQueen Elizabeth favours Robert Dudley, and their affair is the talk of all Europe.Many believe them to be lovers and Elizabeth may not be the virgin queen after all.

My Thoughts:

Alison Weir has to be one of the most respected historical novelists and I have enjoyed some of her books. So what went wrong with this book. I have struggled to read half of it and don't have the heart to continue. I am finding the book so boring.

This book lacks passion. I feel it is very flat and at times it seems I am reading a factual book with dialogue thrown in. For me the relationship between Elizabeth and Dudley is fascinating and I normally can't wait to turn the pages. I think because I know their story and have read several versions, to hold my interest it has to be something special. This version wasn't holding my interest at all.

Is there any need for Elizabeth to keep calling Dudley her eyes and Cecil spirit. This was annoying. Every time Elizabeth addressed Dudley she called him eyes and I didn't think there was need for the author to keep repeating this.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
interesting story based loosly on fact.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
"The Marriage Game" by Tudor historian Alison Weir is a clever and entertaining, if sometimes maddening, novel about the love life of Queen Elizabeth the first.

If you have read more than a few romances you will almost certainly have encountered some in which an infuriating heroine who cannot make up her mind leads the hero and often a host of other suitors a merry and highly frustrating dance. Both in real history and in this book, "Good Queen Bess" absolutely was that girl. Hence when I say that the book is sometimes maddening I mean that one identifies sufficiently with the characters to find Queen Elizabeth's behaviour maddening - as it was, although this book helps you get inside her thoughts enough to understand why she behaved the way she did.

When she came to the throne Queen Elizabeth already had good reason to be fearful and cautious about the dangers of love. She had been two years old when her father had her mother beheaded. A year after that the Queen for whom Henry VII disposed of her mother, Jane Seymour, died in childbed. When she was fourteen her last stepmother, Catherine Parr, also died in childbed. And shortly after that her stepfather Thomas Seymour who had married Henry VIII's widow Catherine Parr, was beheaded for High Treason on a number of grounds, one of which was that he behaved with improper familiarity towards Princess Elizabeth. This may have been part of a treasonous plot to marry her and gain the throne. Whether or not that was the case, the Regency council headed by Seymour's own brother were sufficiently convinced of it to have him executed.

Having seen so many of those who were close to her die in such circumstances, Elizabeth had every reason to know that love could be dangerous.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
the wife loves these cleverly researched history based books
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've read all Weir's other fiction books and loved them all. Been completely unable to put them down. Through her I had fallen in love with a young Elizabeth, Eleanor of Aquataine, Katherine Plantagentant and the Grey Sisters. And yet this book seems to completely fall flat. I found myself skimming over large chunks of it just because it was completely repetitive and added zero to the story while major plots were glossed over. For example, the courtship of Robert and Lettice was completely neglected and since Robert is meant to be the other main character thought they could of given it a bit more depth, there doesn't seem to be any explination as to why Robert chose to marry Lettice despite knowing it would incur the wrath of Elizabeth. There must of been some depth to their feelings but that is totally unexplored.

The characters are dull and unlikable with Elizabeth just being demanding, spoilt and playing games all the time (ok I know she was a little like that but she must of had some redeeming qualities), Robert is seen as niave and nothing to offer but his good looks while Lettice is just a screeching brat.

Please Alison go back to your traditional writing styles.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Alison Weir is uniquely placed to create fiction around the life of Elizabeth the First, given her extensive research and factual work on the Tudor period. In this novel she deals with Bess's infuriating (for her advisers) and frustrating (for herself and Robert Dudley equally) method of dealing with the pressure to marry and produce heirs for England. Her answer answerless continues for decades in a dance of courtships across the royal houses of Europe, all of which come to nothing, although the Queen herself clearly enjoys the 'game' and the gifts and flattery which accompany it. Weir brilliantly describes the utter panic that ensues when Elizabeth contracts smallpox: her life hanging in the balance and no acceptable heir in the frame makes the whole marriage game considerably more serious.

Weir's highly readable and very well written tale presents Elizabeth as part minx and part Gloriana. The vexed questions are all dealt with imaginatively: do she and Dudley have a full sexual relationship, is she so psychologically damaged by her mother's fate that marriage and motherhood are genuinely terrifying to her, or does she simply not want to share her power or be governed by a man? The other mystery of course is that surrounding the death of Dudley's wife, Amy, conveniently parked in the country and clearly unwell. If it were to look as if she has been murdered by Dudley, and not simply taken a fatal fall, one wonders who has most to gain and that is possibly actually not Dudley himself, as a man with such a tarnished reputation will not make good marriage material in the eyes of the world, and Mr Secretary Cecil no longer has the handsome Robert as a significant problem.

These conundrums are all addressed in a cracking work of fiction, which I highly recommend as a page turner that any fan of Tudor fiction will thoroughly enjoy.
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