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on 4 April 2008
This is the second book in the Leatherstocking Tales which spans an entire life of a single man: Natty Bumpo otherwise known as Deerslayer in the first book, Hawkeye in this one, Pathfinder in the third book and Leatherstocking in the ones to follow, or just Natty. The Deerslayer concentrated on the early years, his early twenties whereas in this book he has become an experienced scout, hunter and is known throughout the colonies as Hawkeye for his exceptional shooting ability with the rifle known as Killdeer, first obtained in the Deerslayer. Natty is now about 35 years old. Suffice it to say, he is now a man of renown. It starts when he is engaged in rescuing the daughters of Colonel Munro from the revengeful Magua who was whipped by Colonel Munro and swore vengence on the children of Munro. It also covers the time of Braddock's defeat after the loss of Fort William Henry. It discusses, in earnest, the decline of the Native American population in the East. It does this through the tale of Uncas the son of Natty's friend Chingachgok. Uncas becomes a kind of symbol of this decline, a brave warrior with great vigour, constitution and heart the story shows that the sun is beginning to set on the native peoples even though they are yet strong and vigorous.

By far the best of the tales I have so far read, having read the first three. It is more dynamic than the other tales and the story moves forward quickly. It is again written in that old style of the 1800's which has its own character and is not unpleasant to read. I enjoyed this book a great deal.

N.B. The Last of the Mohicans is very different from the film of the same name starring Daniel Day Lewis. In fact I would say the story of the original bears very little resemblance to the film.
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on 10 March 2017
Great novel. Everyone should have their own copy and read it.
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on 11 December 2016
Excellent service. Good quality book. Would recommend this to others
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on 16 June 2012
I was surfing late on night and came across the movie of the same title starring Daniel Day Lewis. I bought this on my kindle to get back into the story at some point. I'd forgotten that this generation of writers wrote very dense prose so it's a bit more challenging than my usual diet of detective novels. But one for the future when my head is clearer
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on 15 April 2017
got what i wanted
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on 8 June 2017
Great classic.
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on 9 May 2013
One of the best ive ever read Fennimore is a masterand should be better known than he is good bye
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on 16 January 2017
I enjoyed this book. It made me stop and think for a while which is always a good sign. In many ways this novel has a poetic feeling about it.
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on 22 August 1998
The definitive tale of the American frontier in 1757, Cooper's masterwork captures the essence of this corner of American history. A vivid tale of honour, courage and love set against the backdrop of the French-British war, this book will be read and re-read for as long as people still print books
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on 13 June 2017
Excellent story and good value. It's a shame that they had to fiddle with the story for the film.
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