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The Last Girl Audio Download – Unabridged

4.4 out of 5 stars 58 customer reviews

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4.4 out of 5 stars
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Having read and thoroughly enjoyed the three previous books by Jane Casey The Missing, her debut novel The Burning and The Reckoning featuring DC Maeve Kerrigan, I was keen to see what the next installment would bring. This book begins with Lydia's mother and twin sister found dead, her father received a blow to the head but she escaped unhurt. What happened in the house that evening, what was the motive and who is keeping secrets?

Jane Casey's books don't just stick to one investigation they are realistic and there are a number of things going on in the Met at the same time. Maeve is still coping with her arrogant boss Derwent and her personal life isn't quite as good as she'd hoped but she fights on with spirit. The police characters are well defined the cases to be solved have the feel of authenticity without boring us with paperwork etc. The secondary characters were all sufficiently awful to provide many suspects to consider. The only reason why I didn't give this book 5 stars was because I didn't find this case quite as exciting as those in the previous books but being well written the story flowed along leaving the reader to ponder who did it and why!
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The latest in the Maeve Kerrigan series, sees Maeve investigating the murder of a mother and daughter and peripherally, several gang shootings. As usual for this series,we have excellent plotting, great characters and an eye for detail that can be missing in a lot of Crime Fiction these days. In the tradition of Mo Hayder (but may I say in my opinion far superior especially lately) this is a good mystery story, where the solution is not immediately obvious and it is extremely well written. Enough of a "page turner" to keep you very interested all the way through, this series is a great addition to the genre and one I hope continues for some time.
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London in August in the midst of sweltering temperatures which leave the air stagnant, DC Maeve Kerrigan and her boss DC Josh Derwent are sent to the exclusive enclave of Wimbledon village, not often the destination for the Met officers who make up the murder squad that Maeve is part of. Expecting to find the bodies of a mother and daughter, both victims of knife wounds they certainly aren't expecting the home to belong to the renowned defence barrister Phillip Kennford, a man with a reputation for getting some of the most crooked criminals off the hook by questioning the procedures of the police. There is certainly a sense of just desserts as Kennford now finds himself the victim, left assaulted and found unconscious on the arrival of the first response team. Second wife Vita and his favoured twin daughter Laura have both met a brutal end and although Kennford himself insists is also a victim, his arrogant and remarkably blasé first impression isn't lost on Derwent and Kerrigan. The other survivor is remaining twin Lydia, and the scathing opinion of her father who clearly regards her as the "weaker" problem child is made clear from the start.

Identifying who the intended victims of the incident were is far from clear, and with suspicions surrounding Kennford's actions, the question remains why was Lydia unharmed? Met by a wall of silence as they try to make a breakthrough on the case neither Kennford nor his sister-in-law Renee seem keen to talk and along with the evidently fragile and uncommunicative Lydia. Gaining a foothold on the dynamics at play in the family home is no easy business.
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By FictionFan TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 24 Jun. 2012
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Maeve Kerrigan is fast becoming established as one of the most enjoyable detectives in current crime fiction. Young and ambitious, with a normal life, no alcohol or drug problems, a lovely regular boyfriend and a family who love her - what a refreshing change from the usual diet of angst-ridden mavericks.

When Vita Kennford and her 15-year-old daughter Laura are found dead, Maeve and her colleagues have to decide whether they were the real targets or whether someone had been out to get revenge on Philip Kennford, amoral barrister and serial adulterer. This is in many ways a rather traditional detective story with suspicion falling on a small cast of suspects all connected to the victims in some way. Again a pleasant change from the serial killer/gangland crime that has overshadowed the murder mystery genre in recent years. There are shades of the Christie country house mystery here, and that's high praise from a dedicated Christie fan like myself.

The book is told in the first person, so we are treated to a DC-eye view of detection and to Maeve's rather wicked form of observational humour. We see Maeve's relationships with her colleagues develop, particularly with her DI, Josh Derwent, an unreconstructed male chauvinist but with a soft side that makes him an enjoyable character nonetheless. There are a couple of running threads from the two previous Kerrigan books, The Burning and The Reckoning, so though this works well as a stand-alone novel, I would recommend new readers to read them in order to get the full background.
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