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The Immorality Engine Audio Download – Unabridged

4.2 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 9 hours and 8 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Audible Studios
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 4 Aug. 2012
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008SU8X30
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Following on from his first two hugely enjoyable Newbury & Hobbes Investigations (The Affinity Bridge and The Osiris Ritual), George Man bring us his latest offering in his steampunk-flavoured series; The Immorality Engine.
Once again focusing on the exploits of occult expert, and agent to the crown, Maurice Newbury alongside his assistant, Miss Veronica Hobbes, we find Sir Maurice at a new low. He is despondent and introverted, hiding away in a seedy opium den, slave to his desire for the drug. He has been consumed by addiction, his duties as Her Majesty's agent as much neglected as his own welfare. However, all is not lost: enter Miss Hobbes and Sir Charles Bainbridge, Chief Inspector of Scotland Yard and best friend to Newbury. The pair have come to rescue Newbury from his self-destructive anaesthesia and give him purpose once more. Thus, they bait him with the prospect of a tantalising new case: a series of robberies are being committed. Ordinary in of itself, were it not the fact that the perpetrator continues to ply his trade after his own death, his corpse residing in the police mortuary.
With this intriguing basis for a story in place, Mann goes on to lead us through a tale of mad doctors, crazed cults, sickly prophets and clandestine societies, all of which is injected with his usual, boundless energy. Action sequences crackle with electricity, visceral scenes burn with bloody horror, characters radiate with a sense of truth and the pace steams through every chapter with a focused vision of what shape the story will eventually take.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've said it before, and I'll say it again...I freaking love this series! It's like a steampunk Sherlock Holmes, with Veronica the Watson to Maurice's Holmes. Each book gets better and better as more and more is clearly going on outside of the respective cases of the book.

The Immorality Engine is atmospheric right from the opening, as soon as you start reading you can feel the fog closing in, everything takes on a slightly darker tinge, you can hear the rain and smell the not entirely pleasant smells of London. You fall in to the book and remain there until the very last page.

The opening this time was a bit different than usual as we start off in the future, then go back several days. The time jump was brilliantly done, the opening however was a little bit grim. To quote Newbury "The soft loam sucked at his boots, thick and oozing, as if trying to pull him down in to its slick, waterlogged depths, down amongst the corpses and the coffins of the dead." You can see why the book pulled me in to the book, with writing like that! The opening had me panicking a bit actually, being a huge fan of the books! I should have known better than to panic, but panic I did! I had a horrible sense of foreboding and dread for the entire book, a sense that increased steadily the closer we got to the climax of the book, I knew nothing good was going to happen and I was heart broken by the opening. But like I said...I should know better by book three! All is not as it seems in this book!

As I've just mentioned, Mann creates some fantastic descriptions that really spark your imagination and pull you in to the book, as the setting rises up around you. "A perimeter of uniformed bobbies stood like ghostly sentries, half visible in the vaporous morning.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Finished reading this on Saturday, on the train back from the British Fantasy Society Convention. One of the panels asked if Steampunk was on the way out - if this is anything to go by, the answer is a resounding no. This is the third volume in a series. Newbury and Hobbes are an interesting pair - a Sherlockian dilettante and his capable female assistant. The love affair between them is a little obvious, but the author has built it up over the three books and it works well enough. The plot itself is a little wild and woolly, but it's fun and fast-paced. I enjoyed it; I will be interested to see if the author thinks he can take the sequence any further.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Liked the first two, this was a total waste of time. The author seemed not to be bothered writing it. It is all a cliché of characters, endless action with scant evocative descriptions which are at the core of a well written alt hist/adventure/steampunk story. The only parts I got interested in were those with, albeit brief, descriptions of inner feelings (the opium addiction for example); but there were too few and more than once I was tempted to skip pages. Female character is not convinving and Newbury is still roughly sketched. Pity.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the third Newbury and Hobbes investigation, and it's good to have them back. After the slightly disappointing Ghosts of Manhattan, it's also great to see that Mann has his mojo back.

It's immediately apparent from the first view chapters that Mann's writing skill has come on in leaps and bounds; his previously sometimes stilted prose now flows, and his characters are beginning to have distinctive voices of their own.

This time around, the plot revolves around the mystery of a burglar that has died twice, and takes in a pro-chivalry society and Veronica Hobbes's clairvoyant sister. The steampunk elements of the setting are perhaps not as omnipresent as in the previous books, but are great when they appear, such as automaton horses and armoured exoskeletons.

The book is largely told from Veronica's point of view, and is much the better for it. Her distress at Newbury's opium addition, the plight of her sister and her own nature as a spy of sorts is well portrayed, and adds a great deal of humanity to the tale.

There are definite developments in the overall plot, as well, as Victoria's agents finally begin to realise that their monarch is perhaps not as altruistic as they would like. The ending promises dramatic repurcussions for the setting in the next installment; I for one cannot wait.
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