Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's



There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 5 June 2009
Another film that was long overdue for DVD release.

When a typical, English boys' school returns from summer holiday, the masters were prepared for some extra boys, from another school. They intend to make the usual "arrangements" and make the most of a bad situation. When the mistresses arrive from the girls' school that has been mistakenly assigned to the school, nobody, at first, suspects anything is out of the ordinary, because, initially, their paths never cross.

However, it is an entirely different story when the headmisstress (Margaret Rutherford) meets the headmaster (Alastair Sim) and they begin the task of trying to work with (or is it around) each other. Of course, the headmisstress is practical and resourceful, whereas the headmaster is annoyed and less inclined to be accepting of his lot. However, despite calls to the ministry, they have to get on with things and make the best of a bad situation.

Things then take a turn for the worse, when parents from both schools are invited on the same day. A plan has to be formulated quickly and the once staunch adversaries become allies, in trying to keep the two sets of parents apart.

With pupils dashing around on roller stakes, rugby balls falling from a cupboard, goalposts being changed, classes moved and the same pupils appearing in multiple classes, the worst, inevitably, happens and the dignified deception turns into a fantastic farce!

Watch for Alastair Sim, when he is asked to give an explanation for what's happened. A classic one-liner: "Can't you see I'm trying to find one?"

It's a great farce and a great film. A wealth of superb actors and some lovely locations make this a film to be enjoyed frequently!
0Comment| 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 March 2017
If you love the original St Trinian's you'll love this. Starring many of the cast of the first two black and white St Trinian's films. Alastair Sim plays the headmaster of a boys school that gets informed by the ministry of schools that he's going to have to share his school with another school. Enter the fabulous Margaret Rutherford as the headmistress of the incoming school. Lots of laughs as both heads try to pull the wool over the eyes of official's and parents which ends in disaster. Wholly recommended for family viewing.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
This film takes you into a world of Englishness that is certainly long gone, but this if anything adds a note of poignancy to what is an hilarious caper. The two stars - Margaret Rutherford and Alastair Sim - are uniquely wonderful and strike sparks off each other in a magical way. I can hardly think of a more delightful onscreen pairing, or a more eccentric one that comes into the romantic category, which it does, really. I suppose The African Queen would be another contender, but this one is my absolute favourite. Joyce Grenfell is also a blissful incarnation of the jolly-hockey-sticks kind of mistress, gambolling around like an overgrown schoolgirl herself. And the way Rutherford takes charge, calling her and everyone else into line with a brisk but thoroughly likeable manner, is priceless. The comedy becomes more and more farcical as the film progresses and ends up with sheer mayhem, which is delightful because the background it has come from is so orderly. I don't think any modern film could achieve this because the standards of etiquette and proper behaviour are no longer there to subvert, as you can see in the remake of St Trinian's, which is as much a horror film as a comedy, I would say. This is not a film to analyse or ponder too deeply; rather, it is a bit like a ride in a hot air balloon, bright, breezy and somehow gracious at every second.
11 Comment| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 3 January 2013
The Happiest Days Of Your Life, directed by Frank Launder, was originally released for cinema in 1950 and stars Alastair Sim and Margaret Rutherford. The film is based on the play of the same name written by John Dighton.

The film marked the beginning of the St. Trinian's series and finds Alistair Sim, headmaster Wetherby Pond, who runs a shambolic boy's school for the privileged. Due to a wartime/military error Pond's school is forced to merge with a local girl's school of similar ilk. Pond meets up with the formidable Margaret Rutherford, headmistress Muriel Whitchurch, and what ensues is a titanic battle for power. Eventually the two head teachers realise they have to get along to avoid disaster but; keeping their new 'mixed' gender population secret, especially from the parents, causes more problems than either one could imagine.

Watch out for a glorious performance by the one and only Joyce Grenfell plus co-stars Guy Middleton, Muriel Aked, Edward Rigby and Richard Vattis.

The Happiest Days of Your Life runs for approx. 79 minutes and is recorded on one disc.
Region 2 only.
English Language.
Black and white format (PAL).
U certificate - contains mild innuendo - suitable for all.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 June 2017
fun film
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 August 2009
The first in a long line of comic UK post war gems. 'The Happiest Days of Your Life' sows the seeds of the popular St.Trinian's series of films. Great cast with gifted acting by Alastair Sim and Margaret Rutherford. Directed by Frank Launder, it is different from the later St.Trinian's films in as much as the school starts of as a respectable boys school. Due to a governmental admin mistake a girls school is 'billeted' upon them with hilarious results. The old war-time spirit takes over and they all pull together to overcome visiting parental problems. The DVD is a good quality black/white film and is very watchable. (I too wanted to give it five stars, only the 'edit' wouldn't allow that change...) Postage from UK to Australia took four days. Excellent!The Happiest Days Of Your Life [DVD] [1950]
0Comment| 44 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 July 2009
This film became the highest earning British film of 1950. Margaret Rutherford & Alastair Sim are at their peak of comedic excellence adding to the mayhem which ensues after an error by the Ministery of Education mistakenly sends a girls school to share premises occupied by a boys school. This is a farce but of the highest order. Rutherford reprises her stage role as the headmistress with such belief that at times you feel scared for her protoges! Joyce Grenfell has some scene-stealing scenes as the hockey mistress which is later echoed in her role As WPC Gates in the St.Trinian franchise.
Would liked to have had the documentary about Alastair Sim included as an extra as it was on the original video.
0Comment| 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 11 September 2009
I have always loved this film. Alastair Sim and Margaret Rutherford in one film - it couldn't possibly fail Joyce Grenfell is also great as Miss "Sausage" Gossage. (There should have been more of her.) The innuendo is fine quality..... the boys' school motto is 'Defend thine honour', which takes on a whole new meaning when applied to a girls' school! The film's pace is probably a bit slow by today's standards. I've always thought they could have squeezed more comedy into it. The setting, scenario and actors went on to inspire the 'St Trinian' films, which certainly did. This film is well worth buying. Let's face it, you'll be waiting a long time to see these quality british films on a TV channel.
0Comment| 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 August 2009
This film transports us back to a time where innocence was valued, especially in children.

Classic performances from Sim, Rutherford and especially Joyce Grenfell as Miss Gossage.

Today such fun would be considered dull, but I enjoyed being indulged in farce and
occasional double entandre with perfect comic timing from some past masters.

When you watch films like this, you wonder why we need surround sound, Hi-def and 3d,
what we really need is well written and acted films with great character actors and actresses.
0Comment| 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 9 November 2015
The Happiest Days of Your Life is a 1950 British comedy based on the play by John Dighton. It's one of a stable of classic British film comedies from a golden age of British film making. This comedy was a precursor to the more anarchic St Trinian’s films.

It is set in the late 1940’s and has a wealth of amusing characters and hilarious scenes. When an English boys’ boarding school returns from the summer holidays the masters are expecting some extra boys from another school. However, mistresses arrive from a girls' school that has been mistakenly assigned by the ministry of education.

Initially no one realises anything is out of the ordinary, because their paths don’t cross. However, things rapidly change when the head-mistress the divine Dame Margaret Rutherford meets the headmaster the brilliant Alastair Sim. After several calls to the ministry, they have no choice but to get on with things and make the best of a bad situation.

The situation takes a turn for the worse, when parents from both schools are invited on the same day. Our staunch adversaries then become allies in trying to keep the two sets of parents apart.

The film has a great cast including the wonderful Joyce Grenfell who plays Miss Gossage ("call me sausage") who is hilarious as she tries to woo the sardonic English master Richard Wattis.

A film made in black and white, set in a lovely location with a wealth of superb actors from a time long gone and never to return in British film making.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)