Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Alice Cooper Shop now Fitbit

Customer reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
68
4.5 out of 5 stars
Format: Kindle Edition|Change
Price:£4.49


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 6 August 2015
Pure story telling, magical and I can't put these books down...buy this one, buy them all you will not regret it!!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 March 2017
I love this author. A sense of unspoken magic and love. A really good read for those of you who like to escape! 💛
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
The small town of Mullaby in North Carolina, where everybody knows everybody else's business, is a tough environment for Emily Benedict to be introduced, a young teenager coming to live with her grandfather after the death of her mother in a recent car accident. The town indeed proves to be not very welcoming to Emily on account of her mother's troubled relationship with the son of one of the town's most important families, but it's a side to her mother than Emily doesn't recognise and is unwilling to accept. There are other secrets however in the town that people prefer not to speak about, but there are also others who try to make Emily feel welcome, making Mullaby a strange and sometimes magical place to the young seventeen year-old girl.

The Girl who chased the Moon does seem to be pitched as a young-adult book, confronting issues of bereavement, bullying, self-harm, sexual awakening and teenage pregnancy - or simply just the difficulties of any young person trying to fit into an adult world that is difficult to comprehend, seeming to be made up of secrets that no-one wants to talk about. The book is however is anything but academic in its treatment of these issues, delicately casting a spell of mild magic over it all, without diminishing the importance of the subjects.

It's consequently a wonderfully light and entertaining read, with a laid-back Southern States feel that is delightfully enchanting and never talks down to the young reader. The author presents reasonably complex characters who are not entirely one thing or the other, but rather show many facets of their personality and have the capacity to be reflective and change. The magical elements then are not a distraction, but a way of expressing the complex emotional make-up of the characters and the forces of attraction that lie between them, and it works wonderfully.
0Comment| 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 11 May 2011
Have you ever seen the film Big Fish? Well, this book reminds me of that film a lot, what with its eight foot tall grandpa and other magical impossibilities. Allen's books have a wonderful dreamy feel to them when you read and you can't help but get engrossed in the story. I finished this book in the space of a few hours.

It's a charming little story about loss, love and friendships. Even though, when reading, the book feels light and insubstantial, it is full of characters who are suffering in some way or another: Emily from the loss of her mother and Grandpa Vance from the double loss of his wife and daughter. I found Julia, Emily's neighbour, to have the most interesting back story, one full of hurt, neglect and self-harm. For me, Julia was the character who drove the plot forward most. I wanted to understand her sorrow and why she was so intent in leaving Mullaby as soon as she was able. A theme of Allen's novels, and one which I like a lot, is food. At least one character has a strong relationship with cooking and baking. In this story, it's Julia who is the baker. She bakes and lets the scents waft out of the window, hoping that what is missing will be found. Her connection with Sawyer, who is intent on having a heart to heart with Julia about their shared past, is through baking. This minor mystery kept the pages turning.

The main mystery of the story surrounds the Coffey's, the most influential family in the town, the reason they don't come out at night and just what Dulce, Emily's mother, did to anger the family so badly. Win Coffey, much to his father's chagrin, is fascinated with Emily and slowly reveals the family's past and secret. I have to admit that this particular storyline was less interesting than the other, mainly because I figured out very quickly what the mystery was.

Even though the main storyline was not a mystery to me for long, I still enjoyed this little journey into the whimsical world of Mullaby, North Carolina.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
The small town of Mullaby in North Carolina, where everybody knows everybody else's business, is a tough environment for Emily Benedict to be introduced, a young teenager coming to live with her grandfather after the death of her mother in a recent car accident. The town indeed proves to be not very welcoming to Emily on account of her mother's troubled relationship with the son of one of the town's most important families, but it's a side to her mother than Emily doesn't recognise and is unwilling to accept. There are other secrets however in the town that people prefer not to speak about, but there are also others who try to make Emily feel welcome, making Mullaby a strange and sometimes magical place to the young seventeen year-old girl.

The Girl who chased the Moon does seem to be pitched as a young-adult book, confronting issues of bereavement, bullying, self-harm, sexual awakening and teenage pregnancy - or simply just the difficulties of any young person trying to fit into an adult world that is difficult to comprehend, seeming to be made up of secrets that no-one wants to talk about. The book is however is anything but academic in its treatment of these issues, delicately casting a spell of mild magic over it all, without diminishing the importance of the subjects.

It's consequently a wonderfully light and entertaining read, with a laid-back Southern States feel that is delightfully enchanting and never talks down to the young reader. The author presents reasonably complex characters who are not entirely one thing or the other, but rather show many facets of their personality and have the capacity to be reflective and change. The magical elements then are not a distraction, but a way of expressing the complex emotional make-up of the characters and the forces of attraction that lie between them, and it works wonderfully.
0Comment| 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 June 2013
I stayed iin New Orleans for a time and enjoy reading stories of the South. Sarah`s stories just get more magical and amazing. Can thoroughly recommend them whether you are reading on a beach, in front of a fire in winter or on a drizzley Sunday afternoon in Scotland! beautifully written wiith characters you want to meet.

Thanks Sarah for all your books x
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 April 2011
There is something about the way that Sarah Addison Allen writes that I just love. She mixes everything into a book that I love and I always find myself attached to her characters and cheering on their stories.

The premise of this book is a young girl comes home to stay with her grandfather after her mother died. Her grandfather is a giant, but in a town like that it isn't that unusual. She shunned by the town and discovers it is because of things her mother had done when she was a teenager. Emily meets Win, an odd young man from the family most hurt by her mother's actions whose family seems determined to keep them away from each other and who is fighting against a long lasting family tradition.

She also meets Julia, a woman who was at school with her mother, who is determined that she is leaving the town in a few months. Julia has her own unhappy history in the town and spends her time purposefully not laying roots down and deliberately trying to avoid Sawyer, the boy she had been in love with 18 years earlier and who is trying to right his own particular wrongs with her.

All the stories tie together, and when you sprinkle in a dose of magic such as wallpaper that changes according to mood, people who light up in the dark, and people who see glittery trails leading to cakes, it all leads to the near perfect book.

The only thing that prevented me giving this five stars is that I wish it had been a few chapters longer. The ending was fine (sequel at one point soon?) but I just wanted a couple of chapters after the reveals to see the pay-off.

All in all, it was another wonderful book and exactly what you expect when you pick up her books. I adore the worlds she keeps creating and I cannot wait to pick up her new book.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 14 October 2011
This is a lovely little book that is light and easy to read.

Emily Benedict reluctantly goes to live with a grandfather she never met before, in a strange small town in North Carolina, after her mother's death. Her grandfather's deserted old house is visited by strange lights at night and her room has a magical wallpaper which changes on its own, without warning. Emily has to cope with her mother's loss and the town's hostility towards her. Soon she befriends Julia, a lonely woman with a troubled past, who used to know her mother, and an attractive young man with a haunting secret, who help her understand her mother's background and discover herself.

Once again Sarah Addison Allen delivers an excellently written, coming of age story with a touch of magic. Her heartbroken, lonely and usually misfit characters accept their uniqueness and find love and happiness, overcoming superstitions, insecurities and social conventions. The plot, although a little predictable, is well developed, with beautiful descriptions and likable characters. I remember reading somewhere, the term "magical realism" regarding Allen's work, and I think that it brilliantly describes it. The element of magic in the book is enough to enrich the story and remind the reader of the magic that exists in real life, without making it a fantasy, or science fiction novel.

The book also includes the fascinating section "A Year of Full Moons", with notes on myths and lore regarding each month's full moon.
0Comment| 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 April 2012
If I could describe this book with only one word I would describe it as: Quirky. It is most definitely a quirky book, but I love it so for that.

It's been about a month since I've read this book so my review is going to be a little vague but I still wanted to write one because this is a beautiful book in my opinion.

This story is set in Mullaby, in the south of America. Mullaby is a town with a lot of secrets and when recently orphaned Emily moves there to live with a Grandfather she didn't know she had she begins to find out her mother, who has only ever been a great human being and activist in Emily's eyes, isn't fondly thought of and this makes Emily an unwelcome visitor. Emily is driven to find out what her mother could have possibly done to be so hated and finds an unlikely friend in her neighbour Julia, a woman desperate to leave Mullaby who is also haunted by her past there.

I enjoyed most of the main characters in this book. I connected with both Emily and Julia who are really genuine characters filled with inner turmoil. Emily's Grandfather Vance, the Giant of Mullaby, is lovely, Sawyer is sexy and Win is charming and sweet. The relationships the characters develop with each other are very realistic and sweet. You really feel like these characters are real people.

The book's revelations aren't particularly surprising but I really like the fact that the author incorporates a little bit of magic into the world without trying to explain it. This is a book that wasn't written to become the next `big thing'. It's not trying to be some young adult fantasy or be a trilogy or even have a love triangle. It is just simply a slightly whimsical and romantic book that makes you see that not even adults have everything all sorted out and there is a little bit of magic in the world, you just have to look for it. It doesn't take it's self too seriously and doesn't expect a huge fan base, even though I think it deserves it.

I would recommend this book to anyone with a sweet tooth who wants to read something that gives them hope, just don't read this on an empty stomach.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 July 2011
This is the third of Sarah Addison's books I've read and I've enjoyed them all thoroughly. I love the fact that magical powers or unusual abilities are just there in all of these books, often simply accepted by many of the small-town characters. These powers tend to be original and quirky. She also has food as an important theme in them all somehow, and I have a sneaking suspicion she has a sweet tooth! I also appreciate the difficulty in placing her books in a genre. They do include romance, but I wouldn't necessarily put them into that category. There isn't the classic relationship-against-the-odds vibe as standard, for example, and the story is often about more than one female protagonist, and hence more than one relationship features.

In this novel, the main action centres around young Emily's arrival into the town, but the stories of several other characters are also important. There's Julia, living next door, who takes Emily under her wing but is wrestling with her own issues quietly. Julia's relationship with Emily's mother was difficult, but she is welcoming to the teenager while others seem to be punishing her for something her mother did. The key male characters are: Emily's grandfather Vance, the Mullaby Giant, who has no idea how to relate to her; Win Coffey, a member of the social elite who is not supposed to associate with Emily; and Sawyer, a real 'Southern gentleman' type who flirts shamelessly with Julia. The story is told in the third person, with sections from different characters' perspectives, allowing us insight into most of the main players at some point.

I really can't rate this novel highly enough as an absorbing and enchanting read. Although it has a real lightness of touch, there are serious themes of forgiveness and prejudice: it's not 'weighty', but nor is it trivial or overly sentimental.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Customers also viewed these items

£9.49
£5.99
£4.49
£4.49

Need customer service? Click here