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The Art of Choosing Audiobook – Unabridged

3.5 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 10 hours and 32 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Hachette Audio UK
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 1 April 2010
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003F19TXA

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Initially I was hooked by the title and some reviews, however things changed just in the first few pages. I founded hard to finish the reading since I realize the author was showing biased research findings (by her personal and cultural backgorund). Particularly the affirmation that western marriages do not last because people only choose partner based on physical attraction. I found this shocking since I dont know one person close to me that have ever decide to get married or live with a partner just because of such shallow motivations. Most people I know before living with a partner or getting married, ask themselves if the person they are committing with would be, for instance, a good partner for life, a good dad or mum, a good example, if that person would be able to provide, if that person would stand in difficult times, etc. The author assumes that all those questions are just made in the arranged marriages.
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Format: Hardcover
Easy choices - like cake or death, as in British comedian Eddie Izzard's famous routine - don't require much thought or study. But almost any other choice invites complications and confusion, a problem social psychologist Sheena Iyengar mines and turns into fascinating reading. In this study of different facets of decision making, she delves into such topics as whether your devotion to Coca-Cola relies on its taste or its ties to Santa Claus, and she touches upon subjects as varied as fashion, rats, jam, arranged marriage, and even the life and death of premature babies. This compelling book (with a beautiful cover) answers questions about decisiveness with intriguing studies, though you may not agree with every conclusion. Perhaps Iyengar could have offered her suggestions for improved, real-life decision making more succinctly, but she provides excellent detail, plus take-home tips for making better choices in the supermarket or the boardroom. Given the fine job she's done combining research with gee-whiz revelations, getAbstract suggests this book to managers, marketers, public relations professionals and all sales executives.
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Format: Paperback
I was sitting in New York at JFK airport in November 2010, bored stiff. I bought a copy of the FT. (International edition] In this was a review of the above book:

" Iyengar, a psychologist and professor at Columbia Business School, is a pioneer in the study of how we make choices, and her book is in a class apart from the pop- psych ramblings that clog the bookshelves. An erudite and elegant investigation of choice and its effect on issues, such as marketing, employment and healthcare."

So I bought the book because of the review. The content is stimulating and will certainly encourage you, to think about the decisions/choices that you make across all aspects of your life

The author has a tendency to drift from one concept/idea to another. The book I found, also did not fully come across as a cohesive, integated whole, this was most apparent towards the end. One of the strengths of the book, is the extensive literature, research and range of people she has used, in putting this very readable book together.

The very extensive reviews in the US are broadly positive. (See Amazon.com) However some refer to other books, on this sort of topic which some reviewers say are worth considering/better than this one. I have not read the alternatives that are put forward, but have bought some 200+ books from Amazon, over the past few years and reviewed 100+ and regard this as a reasonable buy. My rating is somewhere between 3-4 stars.

In one review in the US the author is described as a " brave and determined women," yes, this most certainly comes across after reading the book. Despite her blindness she has written, a surprising and insightful book. The last part of the book needs pulling together more effectively, to do justice to the content which is generally of good quality.

Stan Felstead - Interchange Resources UK.
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Format: Hardcover
With a researcher's and practitioner's interest in decision-making, I did not have to ponder over the choice to buy this book. Nor did I struggle with reading its 268 pages in just over 4 hours. Professor Sheena Iyengar has written an engaging treatise on what choice means to human beings, how we make choices in the face of sometimes confounding contradictions and uncertainties, and how the sheer option and the act of choosing can affect our well-being. The illustrative examples and stories cover a wide range - from the trivial, such as picking between two colours of nail polish, to the serious life-and-death choice of whether to keep a sick neo-nate on life support or to turn it off.

Using many such stories from research, Professor Iyengar shows how the desire for choice, as a way to exercise control, is universal. She demonstrates how our "framing" of choices depends upon the stories we have been told, and our beliefs that may arise from our culture, religion, ethnicity etc. A freedom to choose may be a "freedom to" or "freedom from", as Erich Fromm has written so how in an increasingly globalised world do we reconcile all these differences in perspective? Professor Iyengar proposes a sort of "metaphorical multilingualism", using her own example of how she uses the language of sighted people although she is functionally blind.

Professor Iyengar takes us on a fascinating exploration of American history to show how choice relates to identity, and yet how many more people are alike than not although they prefer to think otherwise. Such contradictions contained within us in Walt Whitman-esque multitudes, she argues that we constantly rearrange our identities to appear independent-thinking, identity being a dynamic process not a static object.
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