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That's Me in the Corner: Adventures of an Ordinary Boy in a Celebrity World Paperback – 3 May 2007

3.5 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Time Out Group Ltd (3 May 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0091897866
  • ISBN-13: 978-0091897864
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 2.4 x 21.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,579,381 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'Film critic Andrew Collins takes us on an amusing journey of how
he got to where he is today - from working in a supermarket to sipping
champers with the stars. Entertaining from start to finish.'
-- Hot Stars, 5 May 2007

'all recounted in a wittily self-deprecating style. As good an
insight into magazine life as you'll get.' -- Q Magazine, June 2007

Book Description

Self-deprecating tale of an ordinary man's life in the celebrity bear pit - from the Sunday Times-bestselling author

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Nick Brett TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 15 May 2007
Format: Paperback
This is the latest (third) part of the author's autobiography. Having enjoyed all three, I feel as if I know Mr Collins all my life. It is only in this latest instalment that he moves from the ordinary to a variety of jobs at NME, the BBC, Radio 1, Empire magazine and Radio Times, but we feel pleased for him because we feel we know him and deep down is an ordinary fan boy like the rest of us.

The focus here is work related, very little about relationships, marriage, family etc and it would have been nice to have a flavour.

He writes with ease and with a wry look at himself and the people around him and never takes himself seriously. It's astonishing that someone can have produced a three-part biography at the age of forty without being overly famous!

If I met him in a pub, I'd buy him a pint because I feel I've known him all his life and that is the essence of his books, you feel you have grown up with him.
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Format: Paperback
Expert tactician that I am, I have been patiently waiting for Andrew Collins to get his first two volumes of his autobiography out of the way, and get round to writing this book.

As an admirer of his work at, variously but by no means exclusively, Radio 1 (with Stuart Maconie), Q (as both editor and otherwise), Empire, Radio 4 and Word Magazine, not to mention co-writing the best BBC1 sit-com in years "Not Going Out", I have been looking forward to reading for the story behind the scenes with some patience.

And thankfully Andrew has not disappointed. I intended this to be my Bank Holiday Weekend reading, but, able to put it down but not wanting to, I finished it by Saturday evening. And as this volume brings matters up to date, I was forced to conclude that a further book was unlikely to be forthcoming by Bank Holiday Monday.

I loved it. Great read. Very funny. What am I going to read now ?
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Format: Paperback
Stoic, calm, reasonable, with a basic bedrock of optimism in human nature. That's how Andrew Collins describes himself. These are just some of the qualities he displays in That's Me In The Corner, which make him such affable company for the duration of this book. I also like the fact that he talks about Goth records - and how weirdly appropriate is Robert Smith's brand of suburban angst when providing the soundtrack to Andrew's time working in Sainsbury's as a teenager?

That's Me In The Corner is neatly bookended by Andrew's ruminations on the nature of his existence - which is a universal question most of us consider at some point or other. (The nature of our existence not Andrew's.) I understand the theoretical benefits of training to be a doctor. It's not that I have anything to offer the world of medicine, but being a doctor is a role that society understands. Much like Andrew I have taken on a variety of jobs in my life - we are both 'can-do' people - which have served us well, but lacked suitable shorthand to explaining our place in the world.

I've never worked for the NME, Select or Q, but I've always read these magazines. I have worked in business publishing though, so it was interesting to read about the similarities and differences between styles of magazine. Having written reviews myself I was intrigued by Andrew's thoughts on the writing of such things. His generosity is displayed by the fact that he gave The Mission's Carved In Sand album 8/10. I wonder what he thinks of God's Own Medicine - surely the true jewel in The Mission's crown?
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Format: Paperback
Couldn't help feeling that the theme of this book and the reality of Andrew Collins' life seem somewhat at odds; although he sets out to describe the party from the point of view of the ordinary boy in the kitchen, his CV suggests a rather different location. Self-deprecation is all very commendable but smacks rather more of false modesty as he moves from one high profile editorship to another, taking leading roles in many of the biggest and best-loved publications of the 80s and 90s and then going on to what would, by most yardsticks, count as a pretty successful career in media and entertainment. Not quite the shrinking violet, one suspects.

Highly readable for the most part, however, particularly in his attempts to break into the music press (a dream shared by many who grew up in the 70s regarding the NME as a Bible which arrived in weekly instalments), and worth the admission price for that alone.
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I am of a similar vintage to Andrew Collins so I was looking forward to reading this book. But I found it a bit disappointing. The description of the life of a music journalist provided an interesting insight, but I found his writing style a bit pedestrian. Some of the book looked like it had been transcribed directly from a diary, but for entertainment's sake I wished he had spent some time "jazzing it up". In the end I struggled to finish it because I found it boring.
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Format: Paperback
Although Collins' first 2 books made for fabulous reading, were amusing and very entertaining, unfortunately his 3rd book is very disappointing. I struggled to finish it and thought that it was just a self-indulgent journey through his career. My advice is - read 'Where Did It All Go Right' and 'Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now' but forget 'That's Me In The Corner'.
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