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Tennis Maestros: The twenty greatest male tennis players of all time Hardcover – 2 Jun 2014

4.3 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Biteback Publishing (2 Jun. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 184954512X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849545129
  • Product Dimensions: 16.6 x 2.9 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 296,617 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

An excellent and enjoyable read. --Barry Cowan, Sky Sports tennis commentator and former tennis pro

Bercow's prose is elegant, his arguments persuasive, his critiques fascinating. --Neil Harman, The Times tennis correspondent and author of Court Confidential

About the Author

John Bercow is a keen tennis player, having first picked up a racket in 1971 at the age of eight. He instantly developed a deep passion for the sport, which has endured until this day. He played as a junior in north London until his late teens, and qualified as a coach in the 1980s. Local Member of Parliament for the Buckingham constituency since 1997 and Speaker of the House of Commons since 2009, he still finds time to play recreationally when his schedule allows. He enjoys watching the major tournaments throughout the year on the television and, very occasionally, in person. He lives in London with his wife, Sally, and their three young children.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As an avid tennis fan and owner of well over 100 books on the subject I awaited this book with interest. Mr Speaker writes well and obviously knows the game, having played and coached to a good standard. However I was a bit disappointed with this book. The essays on each player include much which has been taken from previously published biographies, many of which I have read. The author is at his best when he analyses the playing styles of his subjects and is more effective in this when he has actually seen them play live.

The best part of the book is the final chapter in which Bercow argues his case for his personal ranking of the 20 players featured. Even if like me you don't agree with his conclusions, the exercise is always an interesting one.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Very enjoyable presentation by the current Speaker of the House of Commons re his choice of the 20 greatest male tennis players. Bercow is also a good tennis player and coach so has the knowledge to write this book convincingly.

I didn't entirely agree with his ranking of the 20 but he's absolutely right about the No.1 though I suppose I shouldn't say here who it is as it's a spoiler. But I did decide when first discovering this book that I would not buy it unless Bercow's No.1 is the same as my No.1. Fortunately it is, so I bought the book!
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Excellent
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It is actually a birthday gift but I know it will go down well. Service received was excellent
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 review
4.0 out of 5 stars John Bercow's greatest of the greats analysis is excellent but did notice a number of inaccuracies. 2 Mar. 2017
By tennis maestro - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
John Bercow is probably my favourite writer of tennis literature. His analysis of the greatest of the greats is excellent and makes for enjoyable reading but did notice a number of inaccuracies. On page 130 It was claimed Jimmy Connors didn't play in the 1975 Australian Open which is actually INCORRECT. Connors was the beaten finalist, losing to John Newcombe. On page 143 It was claimed at the start of 1980, at the Masters tournament in New York, Bjorn Borg narrowly defeated Connors in a semi-final and proceeded to overcome Lendl to win his first Masters and first title in New York which is actually INCORRECT. Borg narrowly defeated John McEnroe and proceeded to overcome Vitas Gerulaitis to win his first Masters title in New York. It was January 1981, that Borg defeated Connors and Lendl, back to back, to win his second Masters title in New York and successfully defend his January 1980 Masters victory. On page 150 It was claimed John McEnroe defeated Arthur Ashe in straight sets in the 1978 Masters Grand Prix final which is actually INCORRECT. McEnroe defeated Ashe in three epic sets 6-7 6-3 7-5. On page 151 It was claimed John McEnroe won the 1979 WCT Finals defeating four-time Wimbledon champion Bjorn Borg which is actually INCORRECT. Borg was two months shy of a fourth consecutive Wimbledon title at the time. On page 164 It was claimed in the 1985 US Open final, Ivan Lendl playing John McEnroe won the first set in the tie-break by seven points to one which is actually INCORRECT. Lendl won the first set tie-break by seven points to four. On page 191 It was claimed in March 1984, aged only eighteen, Stefan Edberg won his first singles tournament in Milan, overcoming Mats Wilander, by then already a winner of three Grand Slam titles which is actually INCORRECT. Wilander had only won the 1982 French Open and the 1983 Australian Open by this stage of his career. On page 197 It was claimed in Tokyo, Stefan Edberg defeated Ivan Lendl 6-2 2-6 6-4 in the final to claim his first title of 1989 which is actually the INCORRECT score-line. Edberg defeated Lendl 6-3 2-6 6-4. On page 197 It was also claimed in the 1989 French Open final, Edberg gained a break of serve to lead 2-0 in the final set against Michael Chang which is actually INCORRECT. Edberg broke the Chang serve in the first game of the final set but Chang immediately broke back in the very next game for one all and after the American held serve to lead two games to one, he never surrendered the ascendancy. On page 211 It was claimed at the 1990 US Open, Andre Agassi met Pete Sampras who he had beaten comprehensively twelve months previously which is actually INCORRECT. The 1990 final was their first meeting in a Grand Slam tournament. On page 217 It was claimed in 1998, Andre Agassi played in the Challenger Series Circuit which is actually INCORRECT. Agassi only played in two Challenger Circuit tournaments in Nov. 1997. On page 219 It was claimed at the 2001 US Open Andre Agassi reached the semi-finals but was outgunned in four tight sets by Pete Sampras which is actually INCORRECT. This 2001 Agassi-Sampras encounter was in the quarter-finals. On page 221 It was claimed Andre Agassi went three and a half years winning no major title which is actually INCORRECT. Agassi went four and a half years winning no major title. The American won the 1995 Australian Open and didn't win another major until the 1999 French Open. On page 239 It was claimed Roger Federer is the only player to have won the season-ending ATP World Tour Finals, going undefeated, more than once which is actually INCORRECT. Ivan Lendl was undefeated in round robin play when winning the tournament in 1982 (January), 1986 and 1987. Novak Djokovic was also undefeated in round robin play when winning the tournament in 2012 and 2013. On page 259 It was claimed in 2010 Roger Federer secured his fifth ATP World Tour crown and equalled the record of Sampras and Agassi, the only other players to have won the title on five occasions which is actually INCORRECT. Agassi only won the title on one occasion in 1990. On page 272 It was claimed in 2010 Rafael Nadal won the Monte Carlo Masters conceding only twenty games in six matches which is actually INCORRECT. Receiving a first-round bye, the Spaniard conceded fourteen games in five matches. On page 284 It was claimed Novak Djokovic reached the 2007 US Open final without losing a set which is actually INCORRECT. In reaching the final the Serbian defeated Radek Stepanek in five sets and Juan Monaco in four sets. On page 304 It was claimed the Sampras-Agassi rivalry, head-to-head, Sampras led 20-14, including winning three of their four Grand Slam encounters which is actually INCORRECT. Sampras won six of their nine Grand Slam encounters and four of their five Grand Slam Final encounters.
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