Buy Used
£9.07
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Former Library books. Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

In Tearing Haste: Letters Between Deborah Devonshire and Patrick Leigh Fermor Hardcover – 12 Oct 2010

4.5 out of 5 stars 50 customer reviews

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£13.21 £9.07
click to open popover

Special offers and product promotions


Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: New York Review of Books (12 Oct. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590173589
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590173589
  • Product Dimensions: 16.3 x 2.8 x 23.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,815,428 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

“This is a book that evokes a lost world of glamour, intelligence and personal scruples. The memory of its pristine landscapes, resolute gaiety and eccentric characters leaves a glorious afterglow.”
—"Sunday Telegraph"
“Spanning half a century, bursting with wit and conviviality…the result is surely one of the great 20th-century correspondence.”
—"The Observer" (London)
“This marvelous correspondence celebrates two of the most important things in the world, courage and friendship”
—"The Spectator"
“Highly engaging exchanges of mutual joie de vivre”
—"The Times"
“…as full of fizz and conviviality as a glass of champagne”
—"Metro"
“A feast for reading…An enchanting book”
—"Irish Examiner"
“Chatty, witty, teasing, gossipy, relentlessly cheerful and with more than a hint of modest

"This is a book about shooting game and raising chickens, attending balls and renovating halls, matters of households and hedgerows, all of it recounted in Debo's distinct and often charming voice." --The Daily Beast

"Spanning 1954 to 2007, the volume reads like an accidental memoir of a disappearing world stretching from the manor houses of the English aristocracy to the olive groves of Greece, its people and places rendered with a kind of care that's becoming scarce in our age of helter-skelter communication. At the same time, the book's title, a phrase deriving from Leigh Fermor's habit of dashing off messages 'with a foot in the stirrup, ' captures the vigor and bustle of the lives that nourished the correspondence...."In Tearing Haste" is engaging from start to finish. There isn't a dull letter among Charlotte Mosley's selections. Even her annotations, often incorporating information from the book's two correspondents, are as surprising as they are informative....More than anything else, the collection is important as an addition to Leigh Fermor's body of work, both because his letters constitute a larger portion of the volume and because the writing in them harmonizes with the books that established his literary reputation." --"The Nation"

"This is a book that evokes a lost world of glamour, intelligence and personal scruples. The memory of its pristine landscapes, resolute gaiety and eccentric characters leaves a glorious afterglow."

-"Sunday Telegraph"

"Spanning half a century, bursting with wit and conviviality...the result is surely one of the great 20th-century correspondence."

-"The Observer" (London)

"This marvelous correspondence celebrates two of the most important things in the world, courage and friendship"

-"The Spectator"

"Highly engaging exchanges of mutual joie de vivre"

-"The Times"

..".as full of fizz and conviviality as a glass of champagne"

-"Metro"

"A feast fori

"Spanning 1954 to 2007, the volume reads like an accidental memoir of a disappearing world stretching from the manor houses of the English aristocracy to the olive groves of Greece, its people and places rendered with a kind of care that's becoming scarce in our age of helter-skelter communication. At the same time, the book's title, a phrase deriving from Leigh Fermor's habit of dashing off messages 'with a foot in the stirrup, ' captures the vigor and bustle of the lives that nourished the correspondence....In Tearing Haste is engaging from start to finish. There isn't a dull letter among Charlotte Mosley's selections. Even her annotations, often incorporating information from the book's two correspondents, are as surprising as they are informative....More than anything else, the collection is important as an addition to Leigh Fermor's body of work, both because his letters constitute a larger portion of the volume and because the writing in them harmonizes with the books that established his literary reputation." --The Nation

"This is a book that evokes a lost world of glamour, intelligence and personal scruples. The memory of its pristine landscapes, resolute gaiety and eccentric characters leaves a glorious afterglow." --Sunday Telegraph

"Spanning half a century, bursting with wit and conviviality...the result is surely one of the great 20th-century correspondences." --The Observer (London)

"This marvelous correspondence celebrates two of the most important things in the world, courage and friendship" --The Spectator

"Highly engaging exchanges of mutual joie de vivre." --The Times

"As full of fizz and conviviality as a glass of champagne" --Metro

"A feast for reading...An enchanting book." --Irish Examiner

"Chatty, witty, teasing, gossipy, relentlessly cheerful and with more than a hint of modest good sense, her short replies bounce off his beautiful essays like volleys of tennis balls off a cathedral." --The Scotsman

Book Description

Bubbling with gaiety and humour, these letters will delight Leigh Fermor and Mitford fans alike

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Product description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
If you have read and loved Charlotte Mosley's wonderful Mitford Letters this will definitely not disappoint!!

Their writing styles, and indeed life styles are markedly different - Paddy's erudite, descriptive, precise and exuberant letters serve to remind us why he is often considered the greatest travel writer of our time. His wonderful descriptions of his adventures bring to life so many different places - from Devon to the Andes to Eastern Europe and back to Derbyshire. He tells stories about upsetting Somerset Maugham with his stammering jokes; about his feat of swimming across the Hellespont aged 69; about rounding up wild horses in Chagford; and about his time building his home Kardamyli with his wife Joan.

DD writes a shrewd description of life as a Duchess restoring Chatsworth. She never fails to raise a smile with her insightful and honest accounts of a whirlwind of social engagements with such a wide variety of well-known twentieth century figures. From Evelyn Waugh, whom on one occasion sends the famously self-professed illiterate DD a proof of his new book, The Life of Robert Knox with the inscription "You won't find a word in this to offend your Protestant sympathies" - the pages were in fact completely blank. She describes he friendship with "The Loved One" (John F Kennedy) and dinners with the characterful Bohemian Iris Tree. Intimate encounters with the Royal Family - including one such "cotton dress" chance meeting with The Queen Mother - who Debo famously refers to as 'Cake' - at the Tate Gallery. Interspersed with these engagements she writes to Paddy with stories of her family - Andrew and her three children and certainly her Sisters and of course, she details her incredible renovation of the beautiful Chatsworth House.
Read more ›
Comment 54 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Mrs. K. A. Wheatley TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 8 Sept. 2010
Format: Paperback
I am steadily working my way through all the volumes of the Mitford letters after having devoured Letters Between Six Sisters last year. Deborah is probably my favourite correspondent of all the Mitfords. Her sense of humour is wonderfully dry and her refusal to be intimidated by her intellectual sisters or her aristocratic peers is a breath of fresh air. Her short, witty epistles make a lovely contrast to the letters of Leigh Fermor who writes elegant, beautiful letters about his travels and acquaintances that are perfectly evocative of time and place. I have never read any Patrick Leigh Fermor, but on the strength of these glimpses into his remarkable life I will be hunting out his travel books and indulging myself further.

There are hundreds of lovely gems in this book but the two that stand out for me are Deborah waxing lyrical about the humble gooseberry and finding a wonderful quotation about them being the 'perfect ambulant fruit', and Leigh Fermor recounting his experience of swimming the Hellespont in his seventies. It really is a wonderful book.
Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The amusing surviving Mitford sister recounts her day to day life against Paddy Leigh Fermor' scholarly & sometime military mind. The result is entertainment of the best. Having read the book thro' it then becomes a joy to dip in & out.
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
A cheerful correspondence over many years between 2 very different characters. Devonshire, unintellectual countrywoman (hardly ever reads a book)but inheritor of Mitford wit. Leigh Fermor, highly intelligent, manically active, immersed in history and arcane knowledge. Their high society circles of acquaintance largely overlap and they both know most of the Establishment luminaries. Sometimes the "luvvies" gossip is off-putting but they are both such lively, active people that their letters are a joy.
Comment 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I gave a golden glowing review of "Mitfords: Letters Between Six Sisters," and, using gold-mining metaphors, Charlotte Mosley (married to a 'Mitford' nephew) has tapped the precious Mitford treasure pit again with "In Tearing Haste," a compilation of splendid letters exchanged over many years by her aunt-by-marriage, Deborah (Duchess of) Devonshire (née Mitford), and her fine and faithful friend, the writer and World War II hero, Patrick (Paddy) Leigh Fermor. (The relationship is supposed to have been platonic, but I really don't give a damn if it has been more, as it was and is most clearly a closely intimate and loving one).

I don't know how many people write 'proper' letters these days, and I have no idea how many such people also retain their correspondence, but it is evident that Mrs Mosley has hit pay dirt in a big way with her editing of 'Mitford' family letters, and she does it with panache and knowledgeable and loving skill, for her selections are superb and her notes are almost as entertaining and informative as the letters themselves. The latest work is well up with the earlier.

But no editor can hit pay dirt without the auriferous ore being present, and the letters themselves are pure gold. Those from 'Darling Paddy' are longer, more descriptive and better written, coming as they did from an extraordinarily good writer in his own right, but those from 'Darling Debo' are both lovely and loving - and amazing, too, coming as they did from a lady who claims never to have read a book (I don't believe a word of it!).

The two writers struck chords (I'm changing metaphors now) with each other for fifty-plus years and I doubt that we shall see, hear or be permitted to read the like again.
Read more ›
Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews