FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Teachers of Gurdjieff has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by owlsmart_usa
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Pages are clean and free of writing and or highlighting. Cover edges show some wear from reading and storage.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The Teachers of Gurdjieff Paperback – 7 Jul 2015

4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£14.99
£3.00 £3.00
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£7.50
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£14.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • The Teachers of Gurdjieff
  • +
  • The Way of the Sufi
Total price: £29.98
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Malor Books; 2nd ed. edition (7 July 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1883536162
  • ISBN-13: 978-1883536169
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 976,480 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Rafael Lefort recounts in this book, published more than a dozen years after Gurdjieff's death, his own journey to find the source of Gurdjieff's teaching. In so doing, he closes the circle of mystery surrounding the teachings of George Gurdjieff, completing the story that was begun in Gurdjieff's own book, Meetings with Remarkable Men. In that work, it was clear that Gurdjieff's knowledge was gained at the foot of a series of Sufi sages throughout the Middle East, in a form of spiritual apprenticeship. Mr. Lefort discovers that this relationship continued during most of Gurdjieff's teaching career, and terminated when the teaching function was deemed to have reached its end. Lefort meets the men who taught Gurdjieff and who maintained contact with his teachings after his arrival in the West, and in the process completes his own journeyman's apprenticeship. The tale he tells is tantalizing as it is absorbing, as he travels from Turkey and Iraq through Jerusalem (where he discovers intriguing traditions about the teachings of Jesus) to Afghanistan. Those who have tried to build a system out of Gurdjieff's teaching, Lefort asserts, have got it all wrong. Gurdjieff was offering something far more valuable than any system: contact with an active, living tradition, which continues to this day. Lefort claims to find in the Persian Sufi Hakim Sanai's Walled Garden of Truth the essence of Gurdjieff's entire teaching, an assertion which Gurdjieff students will likely want to check for themselves!
Comment 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Some people just don't get it. This book is a clever parody of Gurdjieff's teachings. The author, under a pseudonym, wanders around the Middle East ostensibly looking for the influences that shaped Gurdjieff. He is also looking for a teaching that he himself can follow. He meets many obviously imaginary sages, who all tell him pretty much the same thing. Namely, ditch your current thinking patterns and abstract reasoning, find a teacher and stay with him for many years. These examples from the book show how the author makes criticisms of Gurdjieff's teachings:

1. Implying deep meaning to the straightforward. Mention is made of an octagonal building with five windows. Also, a discourse on breathing, a topic G. delved into. Proper breathing is good for health, but it won't get you enlightenment.
2. Emphasis on processes rather than outcomes. One sage discusses the importance of the pattern on a carpet in order to sit on it for meditation.
3. Roundabout ways of saying something simple. He says G. died "at the beginning of the last year of he first half of the twentieth century." (1949)
4. Use of gobbledegook to perplex. A prominent example is the Conclusion, concerning the `Three Domains.' We can sum up his verbiage this way: things happen when they are ready happen.
5. Blind obedience to a master. The sages are against independent thinking. The last sage the author meets says: "Question nothing, obey all."
6. Mystification. The author quotes a long section from the `Acts of John' in The Apocryphal New Testament. He says the dervishes and G. used a dance technique similar to that mentioned in the `Acts of John.' This is just the author's opinion, and we may well ask: so what? He doesn't tell us how this helps the seeker here and now.
Read more ›
1 Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
having tried to get my hands on anything to do with the great,if not revered man himself.i found two choices 1.second hand accounts of his teaching or 2.indecipherable books written by George himself.with the exception of "meetings with...."these where far to vague(for me).i heard that you had to read his books 'consciously'to really understand them but i felt that this was an excuse to cover bad writing.i have read many non spiritual fiction books that where just as hard to read purely because they just weren't very good.then i came across this book.with its unassuming cover i didn't expect much other than a spin of.i was pleasantly surprised.having read many spiritual books ranging from Vernon Howard to Krishnamurti i felt that there wasn't much more out there that i didn't already know.man,this kind of thinking is exactly what this book tackles head on and it pulls no punches.it made me feel glad that i hadn't travelled to the east to meet these men(i know that its an allegory by the way)to receive what can only be described as a spiritual kicking.having just finished it once i am planning on rereading it very slowly with a dictionary as there are beautiful looking words that i had not a clue what they meant.as to the journey george took this dosn't answer any questions but you get a glimse of where he travelled within himself.underestimate the wisdom in this book at the cost of real progress.this book stands alone and the length is just right.
1 Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a sign post. Excellent excellent: how, not what and why.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9d10709c) out of 5 stars 31 reviews
21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d006bf4) out of 5 stars Excellent Book, very beneficial! 26 Sept. 2003
By Jackson Stanford - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a very good book for those people who are interested in the teachings of Gurdjieff. It is a story about a young man from Paris who is studying in a Gurdjieff group. After being in the group and realizing that he is making little progress and that some of the group's main principles contradict much of what Gurdjieff himself taught, he becomes disillusioned. Selling everything he decides to travel to the Middle East in order to find the men who taught Gurdjieff. After interchanges with fellow pupils and teachers of Gurdjieff (some very old) he begins to realize that what Gurdjieff learned was transmitted to him by certain people, in a certain form, at a certain time and for a specific purpose. He learns that the same thing Gurdjieff learned cannot be transmitted to him in the same way because he is a different man, in a different time and from a different culture. As his search continues he realizes that what he began searching for is not necessarily what he needs and what he needs is not necessarily what he wants.
A very interesting, funny and illuminating book for the reader who can set aside his assumptions about Gurdjieff.
For those who do care, Gurdjieff did study in Sufi orders. However, this book is not as specific in giving all of the details about when, where, what and with whom that Gurdjieff studied, but there are plenty of other facts in other books that do tell. For instance, all of the following longstanding Sufi physical and mental exercises were employed by Gurdjieff: the Sufi Quiff or "stop" exercise(see In Search of the Miraculous by PD Ouspensky & see The Sufis by Idries Shah or Among the Dervishes by OM Burke), the heart to heart method of teaching or "the talk of angels" -- a form of instruction where the teacher's voice speaks inside the disciple's chest (see In Search of... and Shah's "Dermis Probe"), eastern hypnosis combined with a breathing exercise used to cure physical illnesses ---Gurdjieff used this to cure cancer, alcoholism and smoking, this technique came from the prophet, is referenced in the Koran and has been used by Sufi doctors since (see In Search of the Miraculous by PD Ouspenksy and The World of the Sufis edited by Idries Shah), the enneagram or nine angle figure is a symbol that has been used in the Sarmoun Brotherhood and by Sufis of all orders for a very long time (see In Search of the Miraculous, Gurdjieff's Meetings with Remarkable Men, Idries Shah's Commanding Self and OM Burke's Among the Dervishes), the wisdoms of the Sufi teaching master Mullah Nasrudin are used repeatedly by Gurdjieff in his opus Beelzebub's Tales To His Grandson (see Beelzebub's and Idries Shah's the Adventures of Mullah Nasrudin '3 books of tales'), the teaching that man is asleep and a machine is a very eastern, particularly Sufi concept to be found in almost all Sufi books in one form or another (see In Search of the Miraculous by PD Ouspensky and Hakim Sanai's The Walled Garden of Truth and Idries Shah's "The Sufis", chapter 1 entitled "The Islanders") and The Fourth Way is what the Naqshbandiyya order of dervishes, founded around the memory of Bahuddin Naqshband, has been called for a long time....Gurdjieff was a member of this order. in addition to these, there are many other facts that point to Gurdjieff employing Sufic techniques.
This book will give you some facts about Gurdjieff, but it is by no means all true and to be taken literally. The Sufis make no claims on Gurdjieff as some people believe. They even go so far as to say that Gurdjieff's pupils did not progress because he had not learned the Sufi dictum "time, place and certain people" before he began to teach (see Idries Shah in The Way of the Sufi). Nevertheless, his life and this book are very interesting from the standpoint that HE did progress as hopefully we all can.
pick it up!
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d00215c) out of 5 stars Good parody of Gurdjieff's teachings 25 April 2012
By Casca - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Some people just don't get it. This book is a clever parody of Gurdjieff's teachings. The author, under a pseudonym, wanders around the Middle East ostensibly looking for the influences that shaped Gurdjieff. He is also looking for a teaching that he himself can follow. He meets many obviously imaginary sages, who all tell him pretty much the same thing. Namely, ditch your current thinking patterns and abstract reasoning, find a teacher and stay with him for many years. These examples from the book show how the author makes criticisms of Gurdjieff's teachings:

1. Implying deep meaning to the straightforward. Mention is made of an octagonal building with five windows. Also, a discourse on breathing, a topic G. delved into. Proper breathing is good for health, but it won't get you enlightenment.
2. Emphasis on processes rather than outcomes. One sage discusses the importance of the pattern on a carpet in order to sit on it for meditation.
3. Roundabout ways of saying something simple. He says G. died "at the beginning of the last year of he first half of the twentieth century." (1949)
4. Use of gobbledegook to perplex. A prominent example is the Conclusion, concerning the `Three Domains.' We can sum up his verbiage this way: things happen when they are ready happen.
5. Blind obedience to a master. The sages are against independent thinking. The last sage the author meets says: "Question nothing, obey all."
6. Mystification. The author quotes a long section from the `Acts of John' in The Apocryphal New Testament. He says the dervishes and G. used a dance technique similar to that mentioned in the `Acts of John.' This is just the author's opinion, and we may well ask: so what? He doesn't tell us how this helps the seeker here and now. Mystification is used to make people think something important is going on when mostly likely it is not.

The book is well written and Lefort certainly knows what he is doing. No doubt he had in mind Omar Khayyam's Rubaiyat where the poet listens to many sages and comes out the same door he went in.
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9cfbad2c) out of 5 stars Setting the Stage for Idries Shah 5 Aug. 2002
By D. Croner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
By now it seems almost certain that the author of this book was actually Idries Shah, who went on to make a name for himself as one of the most visible proponents of Sufism in the West (the recommended reading list at the end of the book lists twenty-two books by Idries Shah and no one else). Although Idries Shah's bona fides as a teacher have been questioned in various forums (see for example Peter Washington's "Madame Blavatsky's Baboon") he seems to have been accepted by many as a legitimate teacher - that is to say, someone who is who carrying on an authentic time-tested spiritual tradition which has been passed on to him by teachers who themselves had been accepted as authentic bearers of a spiritual tradition. Whether he was in fact an authentic teacher of a pre-existing tradition I myself am not qualified to say. I will say that "The Teacher's of Gurdjieff" is not only a highly readable book but also one from which is it possible to extract a few worthwhile nuggets of insight. Brief - 146 pages of large type - and written in a deceptively simply style, the book purports to be a search for and interviews with Sufi teachers who claimed to have taught the great twentieth century magus George Gurdjieff. As with Gurdjieff's own book, "Meetings with Remarkable Men" it is not quite clear if the characters introduced are real living men who the writer actually met and conversed with or simply creative inventions serving his didactic purposes. Whichever, in the course of the author's meetings with these purported teachers of Gurdjieff in the souks, bazaars, tea houses, shops, and mosques of Adana, Baghdad, Damascus, Jerusalem, Aleppo, Istanbul, Tabriz, Konia, Meshed, Kandahar, Peshwar, Jelalabad, and elsewhere, he eventually comes to a final conclusion about Gurdjieff's teachings, of which he had been a follower. "Upon anguished reflection," he tells us, "I could no longer belief that Gurdjieff's message was a complete one. That he was sent to prepare an area for a certain purpose I did not doubt." The purpose was to inject, or perhaps reinject, Sufi teachings into the mainstream of Western thought. The purpose of this book was to finally put Gurdjieff to rest and set the stage for the appearance of the next big Sufi-oriented teacher in the West - Idries Shah himself. As such it was a masterstroke, as witnessed by the continuing popularity of Idries Shah's teachings. Definitely worth reading, but keep a few grains of salt handy.
26 of 33 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9cfc20a8) out of 5 stars A Welcome Signpost 2 July 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is obviously a fable and uses the same allegorical format that Gurdjieff employed in his works. The pseudonym Rafael Lefort, an anagram for "A REAL EFFORT", is quite obvious and further points clearly to this.
Those who dismiss fables and their message because "fables aren't true" miss the point entirely. Readers, disappointed by not finding information and factual data on Gurdjieff's teachers in this book, are prevented from benefiting from the book's central message. Likewise, "4th way" followers, attached to their system, feel threatened by the author's basic asserion -- that the teaching of Gurdjieff was limited and had at best temporary value for real development.
I read this book more than 25 years ago at a time when I was immersed in the books of Gurdjieff and Ouspensky. Unlike some reviewers' protests, the book, which never mentions Idries Shah, did not point me in that direciton whatsoever (I didn't discover that author until years later), so hardly a comercial for the man. The average reader wouldn't get this at all, and it is but the usual sort of claim perpetuated in 4th Way circles, despite Shah's practice of rejecting most applicants (including many Gurdjieffians). However, what this book did provide me at the time was a sensibility or counterbalance in assessing the Gurdjieff legacy. The tale simply reminds seekers to look elsewhere.
In addition, the book is peppered with surprising observations -- from the underlying enneagon design of Baghdad to the analysis of such terms as "kundabuffer"-- which made the reading lively. Other insights and perspectives offered were part of the book's corrective impact, and I took the one-dimensional flavor of the book's characters and conversations as serving this overall function. Certainly, I wouldn't expect this or any work to "uncover" the missing "facts" of Gurdjieff's life and training when Gurdjieff himself avoided disclosing that and went out of his way to obscure many details. Yet some of his followers persist in trying to correlate dates or comb through biographies for inaccuracies, none of which is ultimately useful unless one is in the museum business.
Whether or not Shah (or someone connected to him) wrote this needn't concern everybody not obsessed with conspiracy theories. I would recommend this book for those who can absorb a different perspective and who may welcome the reassurance that an intact Teaching survives and is accessible to those who can "empty the glass."
19 of 24 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d0008d0) out of 5 stars Dishonest 14 Mar. 2005
By Steve - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Written by Omar Shah, Idris Shah's brother, this book has nothing to do with Gurdjieff. The intention was to "collect" lost sheep after J.G. Bennett gave Coombe Springs to Idris Shah. So the basic message of this book is: Gurdjieff is dead, long lives sufism. Which basically is a kind of advertisement. The question arising: Advertising for what? Who is in need for advertisment? Or is this spiritual competition? Some claim, that Gurdjieff was a member of a certain sufi order, and this sufi order is now represented by I. Shah. This is nonsense. And it throws a strange shadow onto whoever is in need to spread rumors of this kind.

The title of this book is a lie. Kind of conning instead of cunning.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback