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4.1 out of 5 stars
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4.1 out of 5 stars
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on 26 March 1999
This is not a chronological sequel to "Watership Down." Instead, it is a series of stories on the lives of our lapine heros and a collection of their myths about El-ahrairah. I like the myths as they provide insight into rabbit religion and values: community values. The stories of Hazel and the others in the warren are like letters from friends. As the companion of a pet rabbit named Hayzeal, the sentiment of these stories rings true. For the true friend of the Watership Down rabbits, Tales from Watership Down is indispensable.
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on 5 June 2005
This book is not very similar to the original novel, which is what I think makes it so interesting and worthwhile to read. I definitely prefer the original, but I believe this work has something important to say. Each of the tales is worthy of the telling and the reading.
I probably will not re-read this as I have the original work, but I don't think I should be comparing this novel to the original one in this review. This is good storytelling in-and-of itself and does not need to be put side-by-side with Watership Down.
The shorter tales are excellent quick reading, and make this an easier book to pick up and put down in our busy lives. Much of what the author is saying in these tales is incredibly fascinating. I was particularly drawn to the paradox that the man-smell, which the rabbits would generally use as a reason to outcast one of their own, is actually what saves the warren. The wisdom of the characters to recognize this is nicely woven into the tale. As with his other works, Richard Adams shows incredible insight into our natural world, especially that of community living animals. It is nice to see humanity in these creatures or, rather, theirs reflected in us. (I am not sure which is more accurate.)
This is a nice collection of touching tales that definitely have something significant to say. As long as readers are not expecting a repeat of the original book, I believe this will be an enjoyable experience. Just don't expect it to read like a sequel.
J.H. Sweet, author of The Fairy Chronicles
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on 22 January 2000
This is such a brilliant book. I have read this book more the eight times. I thought no other book could be as good as Watership Down. I was wrong. And if Richard Adams is reading this please write More Tales from Watership Down. I would buy it
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on 19 March 2008
If you have read Watershipdown and really enjoyed it then you should definately think about reading this. great little stories about the rabbits. some intrigueing, some whimsical others Blackly horrorfying.
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on 23 November 2014
Having reread the book it is interesting to read more of some of the characters but this is not a sequel, just extra padding. Not a cracking good read but a collection of short stories about El-ahrairah, Hazel, Hyzanthlay etc. Largely consistent with the original although the one re the rabbit that smelt of mankind made me wonder how the hutch rabbits were assimilated so easily in the main book.
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on 21 August 2009
This is a lovely book for those who already love 'Watership Down'. Though not a chronological sequel - you get to meet characters that you love from the original book and get to know them better - in many ways.
As there are separate stories in this book, not a one long story - it maybe doesn't grasp you in the same way, but it is just as philosophical and thoughtful as 'Watership Down' itself.
Read it with my son when he was about 7 - he had no problems with the book. However - we both LOVED 'Watership Down' - so any continuation was very welcome.
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on 16 June 2009
Not a patch on the original.

It was almost as if it had been written by somneone else as, for me at any rate, it completely lacked the natural charm of Watership Down.
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on 7 November 2005
The only chapter i thoroughly enjoyed was the passage about Flyairth and her paranoia. However, I don't really like the fact that rabbits are allowed to laugh. Also, how come Hyzenthlay, Thethuthinnang and Vilthuril talk of the Secret River they saw in Efrafa, before Bigwig arrived, when they had no idea what one was in Watership Down. We haven't heard much from the hutchrabbits either. Not bad otherwise.
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on 26 April 2016
Contunuing stories of Hazel and the warren. Great read.
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on 10 August 2014
A wonderful extension to the original book, with more folk tales and a few stories of the water ship down rabbits themselves, a wonderful read and would recommend to anyone who loves Waterston down!
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