Buy Used
£3.36
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by owlsmart_usa
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Pages are clean and free of writing and or highlighting. Cover edges show some wear from reading and storage.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Tales By Japanese Soldiers (CASSELL MILITARY TRADE BOOKS) Hardcover – 9 Nov 2000

4.2 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£14.55 £2.99
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Orion (9 Nov. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0304355283
  • ISBN-13: 978-0304355280
  • Product Dimensions: 22.1 x 14.7 x 2.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 381,948 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Book Description

An absolutely unique book, this is the Second World War in Burma as seen through the eyes of ordinary Japanese soldiers

About the Author

Dr Kazuo Tamayama is secretary of the Japan-British Society, is actively involved in the reconciliation of the Japanese and British peoples, and was awarded an honorary MBE in 1998. John Nunneley fought the Japanese in Burma, and was wounded in 1944. He is chairman of the Burma Campaign Fellowship Group, which exists to promote British-Japanese friendship.


Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
TALES BY JAPANESE SOLDIERS Of The Burma Campaign 1942-1945 By Kazuo Tamayama and John Nunneley
The Japanese are famously reticent about the detail of their involvement in the Second World War. Now, for the first time, 62 personal accounts by private soldiers, non-commissioned officers and junior officers tell how they lived, fought, and died, in that merciless conflict from which only 118,352 of an army of 305,501 returned home.
Much of the material has been selected from recollections preserved in regimental histories, the closely-guarded, restricted records of the All-Burma Veterans Association of Japan, private papers, personal memoirs and interviews. No similar volume has ever before been published, either in Japanese or English.
Make no mistake. These are straightforward, unvarnished accounts, often stark and shocking, often intensely moving, by infantrymen, gunners, engineers, medics, navy men, pilots. They reveal, also, astonishing contrasts in human behaviour on the battlefield: of naked, adrenaline-fuelled savagery - and tears of compassion for the dying enemy soldier. Remarkably, there is ungrudging admiration for 'The Great British Empire' they were fighting to destroy.
They tell, almost casually, of that routine reckless bravery which soldiers of the Allied Forces witnessed again and again and could scarcely comprehend. Of unquestioned readiness to die a glorious death for their country - and deep melancholy at its imminent prospect. 'We cut our nails and hair, wrapped them in paper and sent them to the rear in case our bones were not recovered to be sent home for consecration at the Yasukuni Shrine.
Read more ›
Comment 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
These are first-hand accounts by Japanese soldiers in WW2 Burma. At first, everything goes swimmingly and the troops are racing up towards Rangoon. However over-extended supply lines, and a fight back by the Allies, create a maelstrom of disaster and the latter half of the book is a shocking story of starvation and desperate defeat. Each tale is quite brief, no more than five pages. The conditions suffered by the troops are appalling. The book is excellent for describing the awfulness of defeat. For all the barbarity of some Japanese thugs, the book reminds us that the ordinary foot soldiers suffered terribly as they were abandoned. I really recommend this book.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very interesting coverage by simple writing by Japanese servicemen in Burma. Rather bald accounts with any flourishes but reveal what it was like fighting in Burma providing the reader has imagination and certain "self colouring" abilities. Shameful absence of anything to do with atrocities which many Japanese military units appeared to enjoy.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A collection of stories about the war in the far east from the Japanese point of view. Interesting cover picture which shows a captured Japanese soldier but not his captors. Complete photo is in the IWM.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was very excited when I ordered this book. I've been interested in the history of the second world war for a long time now but never before have I had the oppurtunity to read a book from the Japanese point of view.

Japanese soldiers and officers who fought during that conflict were labelled by political propaganda as merciless, savage killers with a complete disregard for human life. The Japanese troops were made out to be monsters and that point of view is still held by many people today, largely because of the terrible way the Japanese treated Prisoners of War. No book has ever really tried to paint the Japanese during the war as ordinary soldiers and human beings with the same fear and vulnerabilities as everyone else

The book is very informative of Japanese tactics, movements and use of aircraft and mountain guns as support during combat and of the high regard the Japanese had of bayonet charges (a morbidly facinating fighting technique). The book also covers the fear and shame some soldiers felt at being wounded or pinned down by enemy fire and therefore unable to continue fighting. Also there genuinely seemed to be very little fear of dying, whether this was bravado or genuine courage is sometimes hard to tell but I think on the whole the soliders seemed to feel that if it was necessary for them to die for the betterment of Japan then they were ok with it. I was surprised to read that alot of Burmese people were pro-Japanese and supported the Japanese forces in Burma. It amused me in some strange way to read that the Japanese soldiers seemed more frightened of cholera than British soldiers!

I was however disappointed with a seeming lack of human emotion from the Japanese.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Not as interesting a read as I thought it would be. I liked some stories but it glossed over a lot of things.There was no real mention of doubts the writers had about their war.They just felt to me as though they were expected to go and not question any of their actions.A very clinical narration, no real meat in any of the tales.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback