Buy Used
£0.01
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by SNaylerBooks
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Orders shipped daily from the UK. Professional seller.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Tales from Earthsea: The Fifth Book of Earthsea: Short Stories Hardcover – 1 Oct 2002

4.4 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£9.89 £0.01
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Gollancz; First UK EDITION edition (1 Oct. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1842552066
  • ISBN-13: 978-1842552063
  • Product Dimensions: 14.7 x 3.1 x 22.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 743,752 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Le Guin is like Tolkien in the depth and breadth of her imagination¿and here for all those who have admired her epic storytelling, comes five new tales, where, Le Guin writes in the forward, a mere glimpse at the place told me that things had been happening while I wasn't looking...Throughout the book there is a continued sense of the substantiality of her imagination." (Nicci Gerrard The Observer, 27 Oct 02)

"Ursula LeGuin's Earthsea tales are always a delight and her latest collection - an essay and five stories - is no exception. These thought-provoking tales¿take some telling swipes at the 'commodified fantasy' that dominates the market these days...Unlike some of the genre's former 'greats', Le Guin continues to improve with age." (Starburst)

"¿as immersive and well written as anything LeGuin has done" (SFX)

"¿the five stories here provide a varied and enjoyable introduction to the newcomer, s much as the seasoned traveller¿And in the end it's [LeGuin's] more gentle and thoughtful approach which sets the series apart from much of the fantasy mush that followed in Tolkien's wake." (Edge)

"¿vivid and finely crafted additions to the saga, all written in Le Guin's familiar beautiful prose and bound to enthrall Earthsea fans of all ages." (Good Book Guide, 1 Dec 02)

"¿a collection of stories that takes the reader back into the history of Earthsea, LeGuin's remarkable archipelago where dragons and humans are equally believeable." Erica Wagner (The Times, 7 Dec 02)

"Earthsea fans will not be disappointed with these five enchanted tales which have been yet again magically woven by the mistress of fantasy." (School Librarian, Summer 03)

Book Description

The highly acclaimed first collection of Earthsea short stories

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Many authors are tempted to return to their early works in their later years. For most authors, this is a mistake. Not so with this set of five stories placed in the world of Le Guin's marvelous Earthsea. Each story provides a new illumination into what Earthsea is, its history, and the people that lived and loved within it.
The first story, "The Finder", is the longest, actually a novella, and for my money the best of the set. Here we find ourselves far back in the history of Earthsea, when wizard fought wizard as a matter of course, when magical knowledge was jealously guarded, when the average non-magical person lived in fear of what magic would visit them next. Otter, a half-trained wizard with a powerful skill for 'finding' whatever he looks for, falls on the receiving end of the worst of this mis-use of magic, forced to try and find mercury, the King of all materials, for a half-crazed older wizard. How he escapes from this imprisonment, and his search for a place where magic is taught freely, forms the bulk of this story, ending with his founding of the School of Wizards on Roke. In this story we find the same evocation of the magical, of balance between man and nature, of ambition tempered by internal morality, that so graced the original trilogy.
The second story, "Darkness and Diamond", has appeared elsewhere previously, but it deserves a second reading, being a beautifully told love story of a boy with conflicted desires between his wizardly talent and its concomitant requirement of chastity, and his love of music and a girl who shares his passions. A fine portrait of what is important in the business of living.
Read more ›
Comment 36 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This collection of short stories reasserts LeGuin's brilliance as a fantasy writer. The five stories provide more of the historical background of Earthsea rather than continuing the narrative saga of the earlier four books.
It's interesting that Le Guin is clearly asserting a much stronger feminist slant in this book than in her previous Earthsea books, which strongly sets her books apart from many others in this genre.
My only complaint is that the book is not longer (at 296 pages?!) , as I read it at one sitting, and most of the stories could well have formed the basis of separate books in their own right.
I strongly recommend this book to anyone who has enjoyed the Earthsea trilogy (which should definitely be read before this book).
I eagerly await her next book.
Comment 29 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This book is a collection of five short stories that Ursula Le Guin wrote about her world, Earthsea. "The Finder" is the earliest set story, showing the founding of the wizard community on Roke. "Darkrose and Diamond" that could have happened just about anywhere during the Earthsea books, and it is a tale of the love of magic, and the magic of love. "The Bones of the Earth" tells how Ogion (Ged's master) stopped an earthquake. "On the High Marsh" tells of Ged and Irioth, who nearly overthrew the wizards of Roke. And finally, "Dragonfly" tells of Irian, who featured so large in The Other Wind, and her confrontation with Thorion, the Summoner who summoned himself back from death.
I really enjoyed these stories. As with so much of Ursula Le Guin's writings, they are enjoyable and yet compelling. In particular, though, I am sorry that I read this book after The Other Wind. The last two stories are actually referenced in that book, and it would have been nice to read them before that book. Therefore, let me recommend this book to you, and furthermore recommend that you read it *before* The Other Wind.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I fell in love with Earthsea many years ago, reading the original trilogy as a teenager. Since then I have reread these books quite a few times and found that they bear the test of time tremendously well. When Tehanu came out, like many other readers, I found it hard to accept the change of tone and the ardent feminism, but that book too has grown on me. So I considered myself quite a hard-core fan of this world at the time Tales of Earthsea was published, although I was a bit uneasy as well - I was a little afraid ULG was going to do away with Roke and 'male magic' entirely, after the turn things had taken in Tehanu.
My fears proved unfounded, and reading Tales of Eathsea was one long delight. Although the feminist tones are unmistakable, the female focus is never at the expense of the story. The world of Earthsea is as vivid as ever, or perhaps even more so, the language is beautiful, and the stories hold many surprises yet remain faithful to the world of the original trilogy. Magic is alive and well, the great house at Roke still stands, and learning of how it was founded makes me confident that it will take more than a few female students or broken celibacies to bring it down. I think short stories are perhaps the ideal medium for ULG: Her beautiful, economic prose crafts a unique gem out of each tale, and leaves the reader wishing for more.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Ursula le Guin once again comes up trumps with this fantastic series of stories that tell of the history of Earthsea. The tales are from different periods of Earthsea's history, and it's a great follow up to the other books in the Earthsea series, so any fan like me wouldn't want to miss out on this superb book. The essay on Earthsea and it's history and the inhabitants was a very informative guide and gives a greater insight into the main charachters and the people that have been met on the way throughout all the 4 previous books. Don't miss out, if you bought 'The Other Wind', then this can easily be said to be it's s-equal!
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback