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A Tale of Two Cities (Cover to Cover) Audio CD – Audiobook, 15 Mar 2011

4.4 out of 5 stars 1,522 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Audiobook, 15 Mar 2011
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Frequently bought together

  • A Tale of Two Cities (Cover to Cover)
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  • Great Expectations (Penguin Classics)
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  • David Copperfield (Unabridged) (Naxos Complete Classics)
Total price: £87.57
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Product details

  • Audio CD: 12 pages
  • Publisher: Audiogo; Unabridged edition (15 Mar. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1609981103
  • ISBN-13: 978-1609981105
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 14 x 15.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,522 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,330,734 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

I shall treasure the richly detailed explanatory notes. It's an edition which will surely sell to the general reader; yet many truer Dickens specialists than I will be excited by the scope and subtlety of the introduction. --Dr P. Merchant, Christ Church College, Canterbury

The large clear print, very full notes, and inclusion of Dickens's number plans make it the best paperback available for student use. --Professor Norman Page, University of Nottingham

I read it every other year. It is the best story of the best hero. It does not pale. --You (Mail on Sunday Magazine) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

The Vintage Classics Dickens Series: six beautifully tailored editions of Dickens' most beloved books --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is actually the first time I read this Dickens classic, and I'm really glad I did! It's one of the most moving books I've read in a while.

The French Revolution. Dickens shows both sides of the coin well. The cruelty of the Marquis' careless murder of a French child, and the blind dedication the Revolutionaries require as nobility are indiscriminately guillotined. The terrible wrongs committed by the selfish (view spoiler) brothers, and the desire for vengeance that poisoned (view spoiler). The injustices on both sides. Responding to injustice has always been a topic of disagreement. As the French peasants glorified human reason over the principles of the Bible, which those of the American Revolution clung to, they became the same type of tyrants they overthrew.

I was really impressed with the conversion of Carton and the Bible verse Dickens included, that was Carton's hope in his last hours. “I am the resurrection and the life, saith the Lord: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: and whosoever liveth and believeth in me, shall never die." That was what made that part so powerful. The hope of salvation led him to his decision and gave him peace. The themes of this book are sacrifice, redemption and resurrection. A reminder that our hope in Jesus inspires us to greater things.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is one of Dickens' most satisfying novels. Although there is the usual scaffolding of coincidence holding things up, it's well buried, and the narrative feels tight and structured, the humorous and macabre early scenes of the Cruncher family being the only indulgence.

From the famous opening line to the even more famous close, the writing is solid and assured. There are magnificent passages of description, such as Mr Lorry's feverish dream and the French citizens scrabbling for wine from a broken cask, an overt and beautifully apt metaphor for the blood that will run in the streets later.

There is some sentimentality in the depiction of Dr Manette's fragile mental health, and his daughter's angelic nature is a stretch; but these are minor cavils. Whilst there is some meat on the bones of Charles Darnay, and Madame Defarge is as formidable as a Bond villain, it is the dissolute Sydney Carton who is the star of the book: his keen awareness of his own failure in life is affecting and compelling.

As the story grinds to its appalling and redemptive conclusion, it carries the reader along like a doomed prisoner in a tumbril heading to the guillotine, with the inevitability of Shakespearean tragedy. Dickens' horror at the Revolution's bloodshed is balanced by his righteous fury at the universal injustice that brought it about, leading to a novel that is nigh on perfect in its (if you will) execution...
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There’s a reason this book is still popular more than a century and a quarter after it was first released; the writing might be a little convoluted for this modern era, authors, myself included, tend to be a little more direct with their language now, but the characters are all so richly described that it’s a pleasure to read about even the bad guys. The dialogue is exceptional as well, whenever I want a reminder of how dialogue should be written, I take out my Dickens, he is, in my opinion, one of the greatest – if not the greatest – English authors of all time.

I don’t think I can say a bad word about this novel, it’s only my perverse nature that keeps me from giving it the full five stars, although if I’m honest there are one or two instances where I feel as though Oliver’s encounters with certain people are a little too coincidental.

Overall I can only recommend this book to absolutely everyone who has ever learned to read, even if they only read it the once, so they can see how artful a novel can be.

Just writing this review makes me want to pick up the nearest copy so I can rejoin Oliver, Fagin, The Artful Dodger and even Bill Sykes and Nancy.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I know its a classic but..... Having just finished Nicholas Nickleby I was expecting a similarly gripping story that drew me in to the atmosphere of the age in Dickens' inimitable style. I struggled to finish the book and found it heavy going. Sorry to all fans of Dickens - I usually like his work (I even enjoyed 'hard times!) but I found this very complex.and to have just too much unnecessary detail. Other readers suggest that the kindle edition (that I read) is not the best so perhaps I am being unfair. Parts of it though require a level of concentration that makes it more of a chore than a pleasure to read.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Initially I found this very slow; there was a lot of description and some confusingly-written sentences in an archaic style, and the switching of perspectives meant that you didn’t immediately feel invested in any of the characters. It felt different to the traditional Dickens novel, and the characters seemed that little bit flatter and less vibrant than usual. It wasn’t until around the 40% mark that I really started to enjoy it; by then, you could see how all the characters linked together, the unrest in France was starting to pick up, and the mystery of the Doctor’s imprisonment became intriguing. I really liked the character of Sydney Carton as he felt more complex than Lucie and Charles Darnay, who were both quite bland and didn’t seem to have any faults; Lucie especially was so perfect as to be irritating. I enjoyed the sections on the French Revolution, which were vivid and graphic, and you could feel how desperate the people were. It successfully shows that both regimes were oppressive and that villains come from all backgrounds and cultures, a timeless moral.

In some ways I like that the book felt very different to Great Expectations, Oliver Twist, David Copperfield and the other ‘traditional’ Dickens novels, as much as I like those, because it’s just nice to read something different and something where I didn’t already know the plot and ending. But it focuses much more on action and descriptions of place rather than character development. The descriptions of poverty and crime in France, while very powerful, somehow didn’t resonate with me as much as the descriptions of London poverty and crime in Oliver Twist. I’d recommend the book to anyone wanting to try a lesser known or different kind of Dickens novel, but probably not as a first introduction to Dickens.

Also it's amazing that this Kindle version is free!
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