Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £0.00

Save £7.99 (100%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

A Tale of Two Cities by [Dickens, Charles]
Audible Narration
Playing...
Loading...
Paused
Kindle App Ad

A Tale of Two Cities Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 724 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£0.00

Length: 477 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Audible Narration:
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration. Add narration for a reduced price of £2.49 after you buy the Kindle book.
Ready

Top Deals in Books
See the latest top deals in Books. Shop now
Get a £1 credit for movies or TV
Enjoy £1.00 credit to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle Book from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle Books) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 credit per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 on Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Terms and conditions apply

Product Description

Review

I shall treasure the richly detailed explanatory notes. It's an edition which will surely sell to the general reader; yet many truer Dickens specialists than I will be excited by the scope and subtlety of the introduction. --Dr P. Merchant, Christ Church College, Canterbury

The large clear print, very full notes, and inclusion of Dickens's number plans make it the best paperback available for student use. --Professor Norman Page, University of Nottingham

I read it every other year. It is the best story of the best hero. It does not pale. --You (Mail on Sunday Magazine)

About the Author

Biography Charles John Huffam Dickens (7 February 1812 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's most memorable fictional characters and is generally regarded as the greatest novelist of the Victorian period. During his life, his works enjoyed unprecedented fame, and by the twentieth century his literary genius was broadly acknowledged by critics and scholars. His novels and short stories continue to be widely popular. Born in Portsmouth, England, Dickens left school to work in a factory after his father was thrown into debtors' prison. Over his career he edited a weekly journal for 20 years, wrote 15 novels, 5 novellas and hundreds of short stories and non-fiction articles, lectured and performed extensively, was an indefatigable letter writer, and campaigned vigorously for children's rights, education, and other social reforms. Dickens sprang to fame with the 1836 serial publication of The Pickwick Paper. Within a few years he had become an international literary celebrity, famous for his humour, satire, and keen observation of character and society. His novels, most published in monthly or weekly installments, pioneered the serial publication of narrative fiction, which became the dominant Victorian mode for novel publication. The installment format allowed Dickens to evaluate his audience's reaction, and he often modified his plot and character development based on such feedback. For example, when his wife's chiropodist expressed distress at the way Miss Mowcher in David Copperfield seemed to reflect her disabilities, Dickens went on to improve the character with positive features. Fagin in Oliver Twist apparently mirrors the famous fence Ikey Solomon; His caricature of Leigh Hunt in the figure of Mr Skimpole in Bleak House was likewise toned down on advice from some of his friends, as they read episodes. In the same novel, both Lawrence Boythorne and Mooney the beadle are drawn from real life Boythorne from Walter Savage Landor and Mooney from 'Looney', a beadle at Salisbury Square. His plots were carefully constructed, and Dickens often wove in elements from topical events into his narratives. Masses of the illiterate poor chipped in happiness to have each new monthly episode read to them, opening up and inspiring a new class of readers.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 900 KB
  • Print Length: 477 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1523478292
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Public Domain Books (1 Dec. 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004EHZXVQ
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 724 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #255 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A Tale of Two CitiesI first read this book when I was about 15 years old and I am now nearly 60. I have attempted to re-read it several times over the years but have never managed to get into it until I received a Kindle for Christmas! I have really enjoyed reading it in this format. I think it is because the text is in smaller 'chunks' and you don't become phased by a large page of heavy prose. It is certainly a very moving, albeit tragic story, on many levels. Dickens' description can be a little too graphic, however you do get a feeling of 'being there'. I look forward to re-reading other classics that I read at school. By the way, surprise surprise, I cannot remember anything of my original reading of this book!
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Wonderful novels they are, but works like "Little Dorrit", "The old curiosity shop", "Dombey and Son" etc tend to be lengthy reads. In "A tale of two cities", Dickens weaves an intricate, fascinating and (occasionally) amusing tale, with brevity and deftness. London is at once delightful and grim, France is a playground for the self-seeking and (sometimes) vicious "aristos" and a hell on earth for the poor - revolution brews and its echoes are felt in London. A justifiable uprising turns sour and the human impulses to good and bad are clearly revealed.
I am delighted to revisit this splendid novel via the "magic" of Kindle.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is one of Dickens' most satisfying novels. Although there is the usual scaffolding of coincidence holding things up, it's well buried, and the narrative feels tight and structured, the humorous and macabre early scenes of the Cruncher family being the only indulgence.

From the famous opening line to the even more famous close, the writing is solid and assured. There are magnificent passages of description, such as Mr Lorry's feverish dream and the French citizens scrabbling for wine from a broken cask, an overt and beautifully apt metaphor for the blood that will run in the streets later.

There is some sentimentality in the depiction of Dr Manette's fragile mental health, and his daughter's angelic nature is a stretch; but these are minor cavils. Whilst there is some meat on the bones of Charles Darnay, and Madame Defarge is as formidable as a Bond villain, it is the dissolute Sydney Carton who is the star of the book: his keen awareness of his own failure in life is affecting and compelling.

As the story grinds to its appalling and redemptive conclusion, it carries the reader along like a doomed prisoner in a tumbril heading to the guillotine, with the inevitability of Shakespearean tragedy. Dickens' horror at the Revolution's bloodshed is balanced by his righteous fury at the universal injustice that brought it about, leading to a novel that is nigh on perfect in its (if you will) execution...
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Dickens abandons his frequent autobiographical sources to explore the European history of a generation past.
His treatment of the themes of the French revolution are coloured by his Tory leanings, but it is a Primrose League, One Nation sentiment that is allowed to emerge, indicating the political consequences that could befall, without reform.
An emotional story of lives and redemption is moving, although there is humour.
To my mind, while some themes echo those of Victor Hugo, his characterisation is more convincing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I know its a classic but..... Having just finished Nicholas Nickleby I was expecting a similarly gripping story that drew me in to the atmosphere of the age in Dickens' inimitable style. I struggled to finish the book and found it heavy going. Sorry to all fans of Dickens - I usually like his work (I even enjoyed 'hard times!) but I found this very complex.and to have just too much unnecessary detail. Other readers suggest that the kindle edition (that I read) is not the best so perhaps I am being unfair. Parts of it though require a level of concentration that makes it more of a chore than a pleasure to read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I thought I'd read this years ago, but when we started rehearsing a stage adaptation I thought I'd refresh my memory. I don't think I'd actually ever read it.

It's excellent Dickens, well-observed, strong characters, often incredibly funny, everything you'd expect. The problem is that it should really have been A Tale of One City - Paris. The London scenes slow things up somewhat, and it's a great relief when the heads finally start rolling.

I'm glad I finally read it, wouldn't hesitate to recommend it, but with the best will in the world, that first half does drag somewhat. Not a single detail is unnecessary of course, it's all masterfully written, much of it essential to the later plot, and to compare and contrast 18th Century England with pre-Revolutionary France, with the similar levels of social inequality and arbitrary justice, must have given Victorian Britain a real 'there but by the grace of God go we' shiver. But still, it can be hard going.

The stage adaptation went pretty well, as you ask, but more to the point a certain scene towards the end of the novel has started me thinking in terms of a sequel of sorts. No, really.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover