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Taj Mahal CD

4.7 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD (18 Sept. 2000)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Sony Music Cmg
  • ASIN: B00004XPTR
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 40,117 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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Product Description

1. Leaving Trunk
2. Statesboro Blues
3. Checkin' Up On My Baby
4. Everybody's Got To Change Sometime
5. E Z Rider
6. Dust My Broom
7. Diving Duck Blues
8. Celebrated Walkin' Blues

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
If I've ever come across an article sighting the long list of great, classic blues albums, Taj Mahal's debut album is not automatically offered up as an example. It's a disappointment, as it really should be. Cut in 1968, and comprising mostly of covers of well known standards (bar one Mahal original) this is an often brilliant, always blistering, contemporary blues record.

Supporting by a first class band (including Ry Cooder) Mahal energetically grabs these tunes and delivers a well structured and impressive set.

I could spend time discussion the musicianship on this record, but what's particularly noticeable throughout is Mahal's vocal phrasing - his approach to singing certain lines is often unexpected, cramming more words in than usual or following the rhythm of the song and then, for good measure, blowing in to his harmonica to really kick the song up a notch. It's not so much about what he sings, but how he sings it - there are tricks here that you'll still be picking up on after playing this album a dozen times.

Mahal also covers a number of basis here: there is funky, stomping blues (Leaving Drunk), pulsing, driving blues (Stateboro Blues, Checkin' Up On My Baby) and slow, contemplative turns (Celebrated Walkin' Blues). Granted, it sticks to the blues formula, but stretches in many different direction on what is a relatively short (but almost perfect) 30 odd-mintue journey.

If you're new to Taj Mahal then don't automatically buy his best of - sure it's good, but his first three records (or 4 if count Giant Steps and De Old Folks at Home as two albums rather than a double) are all essential, and stand as great purchases in their own right.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Taj has the most incredible voice and the best musicians. His version of Walkin Blues is the best I've heard, better even than (gasp!!!) Clapton's. I played this album constantly for ages and so did my sons when they got hold of it. A great artist.
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This is the album that Gregg Allman bought for his brother Duane which encouraged Duane to play slide guitar with an empty glass bottle and for the Allman Brother Band to play Statesboro' Blues. So if this is not the real deal then I don't know what is.

Taj Mahal has a great voice and Jesse Ed Davies was an inspiration for DA. This is soaked in the south - a must have. Love it!
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I've always had a soft spot for the Blues of Henry Fredericks from New York’s Harlem (Taj Mahal to you and I) - and his stunning 1968 self-titled "Taj Mahal" debut album still ranks in my books as one of the all-time-greats. Like "Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac" (1968), John Mayall's "Blues From Lauren Canyon" (1968), Johnny Winter's "Second Winter" (1969) or Shuggie Otis' 1970 debut album "Here Comes Shuggie Otis" - "Taj Mahal" is the kind of good-time hair-shaking bum-waddling Blues-Rock that I adore. And to me it still sounds as fresh as a daisy - with maybe less hair and a wee bit of a middle-aged droop around the tum tum (not mine you understand). Here are the 'Leaving Trunk' and 'E Z Rider' details…

UK released September 2000 on Sony/Columbia/Legacy COL 498173 2 (Barcode 5099749817326) - this CD is a straightforward transfer of his debut LP and plays out as follows (33:00 minutes):

1. Leaving Trunk
2. Statesboro Blues
3. Checkin' Up On My Baby
4. Everybody's Got To Change Sometime
5. E Z Rider [Side 2]
6. Dust My Broom
7. Diving Duck Blues
8. The Celebrated Walkin' Blues
Tracks 1 to 8 are his debut album "Taj Mahal" - released February 1968 in the USA on Columbia CL 2779 (Mono) and CS 9579 (Stereo) and in the UK on Direction 8-63279 (mono) and S 8-63279 (Stereo). The Stereo mix is used in this 2000 remaster and there are no bonus tracks.

The 12-page booklet is a nicely substantial affair reproducing the album’s original rear artwork and liner notes by Tom Nolan on the inner pages. There is then a short essay on Taj Mahal by Stanley Crouch, album and reissue credits – all peppered with a bunch of outtake photos from the recording sessions.
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Format: Audio CD
Taj Mahal began his solo career with this eponymous debut which is still regarded by many as his best work. The album contains material from Sleepy John Estes (Divin' Duck Blues), Blind Willie Mctell (Statesboro' Blues) and Robert Johnson (Dust My Broom), and basically pays homage to the blues of the Mississippi Delta and the Deep South. Mahal himself plays harp on the album and although he developed into a fairly accomplished guitarist in later years it is unlikely he would have been able to match the talents of Jesse Ed Davis, (who later went on to work with John Lennon,amongst others), and Ry Cooder, the formidable young slide player who of course achieved his own success as a solo artist. The highlight of the album, for me anyway, is the final track, here titled "The Celebrated Walkin' Blues". This is an old delta theme, performed, and in some cases recorded, by bluesmen from Son House, through Robert Johnson and Muddy Waters. The lyrics may vary but the format remains the same and will be familiar to anyone with an interest in pre war blues. This version completes an album which is lovingly recorded by an artist who has total empathy with the blues. CHRIS TODD, BOLTON.
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