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Tago Mago [VINYL] Double LP, Original recording remastered

4.4 out of 5 stars 45 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Vinyl (23 Jun. 2014)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Double LP, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Mute
  • ASIN: B00HVP9Z7Q
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 69,010 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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Product Description

Product Description

Following the release of the Can Vinyl Box - the limited edition box set that consisted of 17 LPs housed in a linen wrapped box, Mute are now proud to release the CAN studio albums individually on vinyl.

A "landmark release in the history of rock 'n' roll" - MOJO Honours List winner of Classic Album Award Tago Mago has been cited as an influence for a host of artists including John Lydon, Radiohead, The Fall, Ariel Pink, Fuck Buttons, Sonic Youth, Factory Floor and Queens Of The Stone Age, Portishead.

Mastered and cut to vinyl by Kevin Metcalfe at The Soundmasters, London.

Remasters and vinyl processing was coordinated by long time collaborator, Jono Podmore.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 13 Jan. 2003
Format: Audio CD
This must be my sixth attempt to write a review of Tago Mago, Can's third album, which is far and away the most difficult album to write about that I have ever encountered. It's dense and confounding. It profoundly challenges the concept of music. It is the closest one can come to a sound recording of the mental processes of dementia. And it is utter, utter genius.
If Amazon would let me, I would give Tago Mago eleven stars. Never mind the fact that it's not the most accessible of Can's albums (that would be Soundtracks), or the most disciplined (see Ege Bamyasi.) I can't even say with conviction that it's their best work. But what I do know for certain is that Can's reputation for musical radicalism, avant-garde experiments, and free sound structure, is almost entirely based on Tago Mago, on which the German boys take rock music from its bases in Britain and America and launch it to Neptune.
Tago Mago is so daring, imaginative, and downright schizophrenic that it makes everything else that Can ever did seem tame and safe by comparison. It's often seen as a deliberate concept album about the path from sanity to absolute madness; I don't know how deliberate the concept was, but it certainly works. You can hear order and stability be dissected, exploded, and rebuilt completely.
The proceedings start off with "Paperhouse," a hypnotic song in a slow, bluesy groove that builds to a frenetic, almost desperate shout of sound, drums pounding with tremendous insistence, electronics offering bloopy bleeps here and there, and guitar and bass trying to maintain some sense of melody to keep the whole thing from deteriorating into mad chaos. After seven and a half minutes it dissolves into "Mushroom," a funky midtempo that is fairly consistent.
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Format: Audio CD
'Tago Mago' advanced on the climes established by 'Delay 1968','Monster Movie' & 'Soundtracks' and remains part of a trilogy of classics when Can were fronted by Damo Suzuki (the others being 'Ege Bamyasi' & 'Future Days'). It's an epic double-album that opens and closes on similar sounding tracks, between veering off into avant-garde directions which get stranger as the record progresses.
'Paperhouse' builds and builds from a funky-jazzy groove (that would become more apparent on 'Ege Bamyasi'), prior to shifting to the paranoid 'Mushroom', which would be covered by The Jesus & Mary Chain and sounds not unlike recent Primal Scream, where Damo hollers "I gotta keep my distance!" (or is it "I gotta keep my despair"? - it sounds like both...). 'Oh Yeah' builds on the strange-electronic-inflected grooves previously found on records by Can & precursors like The Beatles & The White Noise, again feeling like an odd groove with backwards-looped vocals that disorient (Can voyaging to inner space...). This peaks with the epic 'Halleluwah', which is thoroughly hypnotic, stretching a simple-groove over & over & predicting things like Happy Mondays ('Hallelujah') & The Stone Roses ('Fools Gold 9.53').
'Aumgn' is more out there, a minimal electronic based piece that some find unlistenable- it sounds somewhere between Stockhausen and Japan's 'Ghosts' and would fit on a compilation between 'The Visitations' & 'Beachy Head.' Things get odder with 'Peking-O', which starts off with sinister ambient electronics, then a vocal "driving..." that reminds me of both Ian Curtis & Jim Morrison, before shifting into loops and babble that some may find hilarious.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
It pains me to give any Can release a single solitary star- especially for one of their best albums- but I'm going to have to concur with W. Thomas Phillip's review: this edition of Tago Mago is a huge let down.

I should emphasise that this is one of my all-time favourite albums. I wasn't concerned that CD1 featured the 2004 remaster- it sounds incredible, and any newer release could have run the risk of being brickwalled to death. As I suspect could be said for many long-term fans, the main draw with this reissue was the new bonus live disc.

Unfortunately, it sounds perfectly horrible- muddy, hissy, and, unbelievably, running at the incorrect speed.

To add insult to injury, this concert has been (quite literally) freely available on bootlegs for many years in much better quality. What could have been a great opportunity for Can fans old and new to experience this incredible band in all their live glory has been completely ruined by this shoddy presentation.

If you've never owned this record before, you are in for a mind-blowing experience. Please do yourself a favour however, and do not buy this edition. Aside from the nice Mini Vinyl gatefold artwork contained within the UK cover, there is no reason to own this.

Instead, any first time listeners should order the previous CD version, or the 2004 SACD hybrid. Long-term fans who already own the record would be well advised to give this a miss. Hardcore fans will likely already have the live recording in better quality. Fingers crossed that the forthcoming Lost Tapes will be a more fitting archival excursion.
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