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THE TIGER IN THE SMOKE Hardcover – 1953

4.2 out of 5 stars 53 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Reprint Society; Book Club Edition edition (1953)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000O556M8
  • Product Dimensions: 18.6 x 12.6 x 2.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,354,280 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

BOOK ITSELF STILL A NICE TIGHT BINDING, DUSTJACKET IS SOILED AND A LITTLE TATTY BUT CERTAINLY ALL INTACT.


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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
One of the genius things about crime novels is that because they're all the same, there are limitless possibilities of what you can do with them. Yes, there's the basic structure that the reader expects, but beyond that the author can use his or hers `hunt the murderer' yarn to tackle anything they damn well like.

Take this interesting, if very flawed, Albert Campian novel. The basic set-up is that there's a ruthless and expert killer on the loose in London; he is one of the most dangerous men in Britain, and Campian and Scotland Yard have to track him down before any more victims fall. And yet the murder plot is almost the least fascinated element of this book. Written in 1952 and set post-war, Allingham portrays a dark fog forever hanging over the city. Such is the depth and darkness of this fog/smog, that it becomes almost existential in nature. The characters in this book are literally unable to see what is in front of them and where they are going; they're always fighting against the gloom and lost in this world of blackness. Without a doubt there's a sense of post-war malaise in this fog, Britain was a country on the winning side of the war, but they don't feel like victors in this gloomy London - instead they seem to have lost their sunshine and their joy. And perhaps even more than that, a dark and heavy fog is by its nature hugely oppressive, and this oppression is felt right across society itself. If you read the adventures of the aristocratic detective Campian which were written before the war, then there is a sense of a very ordered society. Everybody knows their place. In The Tiger in the Smoke on the other hand, that society is pushed down and crumbling.
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Format: Paperback
it is sad that so much of margery allingham's oeuvre is currently out of print; vintage are to be commended for (slowly) rectifying this. the success of poirot and wimsey has relegated campion to a thoroughly undeserved third place in the canon of golden age crime-busters. although campion is not the central character of 'tiger', this gives the reader the chance to savour allingham's evocative prose style. in this london, former soldiers who found a home in the army are now misfits, cut off from normal society. voices from the past can be heard through the fog. oates, luke and campion seem powerless to apprehend a magnificently ruthless enemy. do yourself a favour and read...
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Format: Paperback
From the opening scene in a London 'pea-souper', the descriptive powers of this writer suck you into the strange and captivating thriller. Set in post-WWII London, each of the characters is wonderfully and mesmorisingly described, with effective cameos, such as the first meeting between the police inspector Luke and the old Canon Avril. It is utterly believable and has the best (should it be vilest?) description of evil, which takes a whole chapter and is set at night in a dark church. The 'Tiger' is a psychopathic killer and 'the Smoke' is London, but the story does revolve around a commando raid on the French coast, and the finale is set there. One of Allingham's Campion books, it marks the progression of this character from the 20s fop to the chastened and matured person who has suffered through the six years of war. A good read and re-read. Unputdownable!
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By Damaskcat HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 9 Aug. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Albert Campion is asked to get involved with a strange case in the middle of a very bad London fog. A young relative of his, Meg a widow, is about to remarry but she keeps receiving photographs through the post of her late husband in situations where the photographs can only have been taken recently. Is it a crude blackmail attempt or is it more sinister than that?

Featuring the inimitable Charlie Luke, some definitely strange criminals and a marvellous clergyman this is an entertaining mystery story with some nail biting moments when it looks as though no one is going to get out of the mess alive. Many of the interactions between the characters have much more depth than can usually be expected from crime novels.

Margery Allingham was writing when English detective fiction was in its heyday - the Golden Age of crime fiction - and the story has stood the test of time. It portrays an era when principles were important in everyday life and people tried to live up to certain standards. If you like your crime fiction in the classic mould then try Margery Allingham's Campion stories.
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By S Riaz HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 12 May 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the fourteenth novel in the Albert Campion series and was published in 1952. The book begins with Meg Elginbrodde and Geoffrey Levett in a taxi. Levett is a wealthy businessman, used to getting what he wants and he is desperately in love with Meg and intends to marry her. The problem is that since their engagement was announced, Meg has been receiving photographs from her husband - who she believed had died in the war. She has turned to Campion and Detective Chief Inspector Charles Luke for advice, when a meeting is proposed between her and her former husband. The man she glimpses across the fog bound platform of a station is certainly not her husband, but the mystery deepens after he is questioned and released.

What follows is an extremely atmospheric mystery; set in a post-war, weary London in a middle of a pea souper fog. As events escalate, Levett goes missing and witnesses are killed. A convict called Jack Havoc has escaped from prison – he is hunting a “treasure”, while Luke and Campion search for him in the “Smoke,” which is the fog bound city of London. There are some wonderful characters, such as the saintly Canon Avril, the brilliantly named Tiddy Doll and the elusive Havoc himself – the Tiger of the story.

I had only read one Campion novel before and I found myself a little lost so far into the series, as obviously you were meant to know some familiar characters. However, Campion himself did not feature strongly in the book, meaning that it worked quite well as a stand-alone story. London itself – battered, weary, down at heel – is almost a character in itself. Everyone stumbles around, unable to see and events are revealed slowly, almost as glimpses through the fog. If you are interested in London shortly after the war, then this novel gives you a great view of the City at that time and is worth reading just for the historical aspect of the book.
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