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Symphony No. 3 in D min, WAB 101, original version SACD

5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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£14.46 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product details

  • Orchestra: Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
  • Conductor: Blomstedt
  • Composer: Bruckner
  • Audio CD (9 Sept. 2013)
  • Please Note: Requires SACD-compatible hardware
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: SACD
  • Label: Querstand
  • ASIN: B00530GNAS
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 234,500 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Gemassigt, Misterioso.
  2. Adagio (Feierlich).
  3. Scherzo (Ziemlich schnell).
  4. Finale (Allegro).

Product Description

SACD/CD hybrid issue of a live recording made on 23rd and 24th September 2010 in the Gewandhaus, Leipzig. This is a further issue in the series of Bruckner Symphonies recorded live by these artists. Previous issues feature Symphonies 5, 6, 7 & 8.

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Let's deal with the technical stuff first-this live 2010 performance is in state-of-the art sound in both stereo and SACD. There is a beautiful, warm organic sound, perfectly detailed and with a very wide dynamic range-not much compression if any. Contrasts between the extreme ppp and fff markings are brilliantly captured. This great orchestra plays with an assuredness and finesse that bring tears of joy to the lover of great music making. While this is very much a North German sound, eschewing the "dirty" string tone of Vienna and the riper Brass of Vienna and Munich, there is no lack of warmth about the sound, and the burnished and homogenous string tone surpasses in excellence that of Berlin and rivals that of Dresden, and is worthy of the highest possible praise.
Herbert Blomstedt had already established his Bruckner credentials in the early 80's with 2 superb recordings-4&7-for Denon with the Dresden Staatskapelle both of which were "Critics Choice" versions for many years and which I still treasure. In this cycle of live recordings from performances in the New Leipzig Gewandhaus with its superb acustics, he has not adhered slavishly to one set of editions, so that he adopts the Haas for the Eighth and the 2000 Benjamin Cohrs ( the "C" of the SPCM committee) which purportedly corrects some errors in the Nowak Edition for the Ninth (which is superb!).
The Third Symphony is a nightmare when it comes to "Editions"-Nowak gave up after 3 separate editions, there is a pre-war Haas, bowdlerised versions by Ferdinand Lowe, Schalk and various others not to mention the Marthé Reloaded version which I love for the sheer beauty, grandeur-and cheek of it.
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There's no hard and fast rule (is that a phrase?) for choosing editions of Bruckner. The master's first thoughts on his Symphony No.4, 1874? you're mad. The original 8th? A glutton for punishment. The revision of the 1st? Mildly eccentric. The Third...

Herbert Blomstedt has opted for the first version of the Symphony No.3, the one predating the chaotic premiere of 1877 when Bruckner was humiliated in front of the Viennese. Some consolation in getting the last laugh as different versions of his symphony are brought back to life from the archives. Version 1 is the full wagnerian corpus, but unlike an old dinosaur such as Bruckner: Symphony No. 3 (1873 Original Version, ed. Nowak) HB isn't all day about it, keeping his misterioso mobile and warmly recorded; the adagio agile and finale on the ball. One is reminded of those early versions of Sibelius (Oceanides: Symphony No.5) with their more deliberate tempi and additional string figurations. Attractive, decorative, but necessary?

There could be a case for hearing Bruckner's 3rd, 4th and 8th symphonies in their first concept editions as separate works, ones that reveal another side of the Austrian composer, and a Bruckner freak will probably want a representative recording on hand to sample. You could hardly do better than Blomstedt, except as regards price. What about good old Inbal Bruckner : Symphony No.3 - Apex high point of an uneven cycle?
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As with the Seventh, I have always liked the Third - Bruckner's "Wagner symphony" - from first hearing, whereas I initially struggled to assimilate the scale and idiom of certain others of Bruckner's symphonies. For sheer entertainment and a lot of great, if eccentric, musicianship, I enjoy Peter Jan Marthé's "Bruckner III Reloaded", but my favourite orthodox versions have always been of the original 1873 score. I much admire Inbal's recording with the Frankfurt orchestra on the super-bargain Apex label, but this superb account by Blomstedt has the advantage of the Leipzig Gewandhausorchester and even better sound than Inbal's. I am all the more pleased to be able to praise it as I was lukewarm about his Fourth with the Dresden Staatskapelle.

There is an aristocratic poise and assuredness about this reading which has the confidence to observe the marked pauses and resist resorting to glutinous tempi in order to suggest profundity: Blomstedt directs a propulsive, sometimes even driven, interpretation. He is overall only a couple of minutes faster than Inbal but never sounds breathless. The ostinato figure of the Adagio is massive and insistent, building inexorable in a movement that can outstay its welcome in less confident hands. The glow and virtuosity of the Gewandhausorchester help keep the ear seduced and the beatific conclusion is deeply satisfying, as the horns sound their consolatory A flat then G major chords. The Scherzo is fierce and thrilling; the Finale is at first menacing and ultimately heroically inspiring.

The Third was Kna's favourite - although he played the revision by Rättig of the Schalk edition first played in 1890 by Hans Richter and you can't hear him even in stereo, let alone the superb digital sound Blomstedt is given here. This is as convincing an advocacy of Bruckner's first thoughts as you will find.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars 3 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thrilling - and in terrific sound 23 April 2013
By Ralph Moore - Published on Amazon.com
As with the Seventh, I have always liked the Third - Bruckner's "Wagner symphony" - from first hearing, whereas I initially struggled to assimilate the scale and idiom of certain others of Bruckner's symphonies. For sheer entertainment and a lot of great, if eccentric, musicianship, I enjoy Peter Jan Marthé's "Bruckner III Reloaded", but my favourite orthodox versions have always been of the original 1873 score. I much admire Inbal's recording with the Frankfurt orchestra on the super-bargain Apex label, but this superb account by Blomstedt has the advantage of the Leipzig Gewandhausorchester and even better sound than Inbal's. I am all the more pleased to be able to praise it as I was lukewarm about his Fourth with the Dresden Staatskapelle.

There is an aristocratic poise and assuredness about this reading which has the confidence to observe the marked pauses and resist resorting to glutinous tempi in order to suggest profundity: Blomstedt directs a propulsive, sometimes even driven, interpretation. He is overall only a couple of minutes faster than Inbal but never sounds breathless. The ostinato figure of the Adagio is massive and insistent, building inexorable in a movement that can outstay its welcome in less confident hands. The glow and virtuosity of the Gewandhausorchester help keep the ear seduced and the beatific conclusion is deeply satisfying, as the horns sound their consolatory A flat then G major chords. The Scherzo is fierce and thrilling; the Finale is at first menacing and ultimately heroically inspiring.

The Third was Kna's favourite - although he played the revision by Rättig of the Schalk edition first played in 1890 by Hans Richter and you can't hear him even in stereo, let alone the superb digital sound Blomstedt is given here. This is as convincing an advocacy of Bruckner's first thoughts as you will find.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A towering performance of the 1873 first edition of Bruckner's 3rd symphony 1 Jan. 2016
By Mogulmeister - Published on Amazon.com
WOW!! What a great performance of the 3rd! Blomstedt plays the original 1873 version (which I’ve come to accept over my decades of listening as the best of the three editions of this symphony) with white hot urgency and intense involvement. I’ve generally responded the most to B3 performances that take the opposite approach (far slower) in the 1873 edition, such as Remy Ballot and Georg Tintner. So imagine my surprise when I heard this performance with its very different interpretation than the ones I like—and I find it completely convincing! Indeed, Blomstedt and Ballot have diametrically different interpretations, polar opposites in many ways, yet I find both readings remarkably successful and persuasive. I can’t think of any other Bruckner symphony where I’ve had this same experience. Regardless, I have to say I loved Blomstedt’s B3 performance. I’ve never heard the 4th movement (the Achilles heel of this symphony, in my opinion) so well rendered. Overall, Blomstedt’s B3 is incredibly involved and deeply felt, and whereas in B2 Blomstedt seems to miss out on the spirituality of the symphony, I hear it in spades in B3. Well done!
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Live performance, not advertised as such 25 Oct. 2015
By Brent Peterson - Published on Amazon.com
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It's a great performance, but from beginning I noticed the muted sonics one normally associates with a live performance. Sure enough, the music ends with audience applause.

So it isn't a crime to sell a CD of live performance with audience present. However, there is long-standing precedent of labeling it as such, and it should be labeled as such. Some people like to know what they're getting before paying out.
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