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Sympathy for the Devil: The Birth of the Rolling Stones and the Death of Brian Jones by [Trynka, Paul]
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Sympathy for the Devil: The Birth of the Rolling Stones and the Death of Brian Jones Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 31 customer reviews

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Length: 416 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product description

Review

"A great, cautionary tale" (George Byrne Irish Independent)

"Thorough and well researched" (Craig Brown Mail on Sunday)

"Fascinating... wonderful at evoking that very non-modern age of the 50s and 60s" (Mark Blake Mojo)

"Magnificent and controversial ... a monumental book" (Paul Gleason stereoembersmagazine.com)

Book Description

The definitive story of Brian Jones, founder of the Rolling Stones.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 6303 KB
  • Print Length: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Transworld Digital (28 Aug. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0593071220
  • ISBN-13: 978-0593071229
  • ASIN: B00KY3MZBK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 31 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #88,752 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
To begin with, Paul Trynka's book is outstanding. It's probably the most coherent defense of Brian Jones's legacy and stands as an excellent reminder of how critical Brian Jones was both to the Stones as well as to the evolution of popular music. Brian was a visionary and also a tragically fragile artist whose much too early death at age 27 resulted from his chosen lifestyle and from his ultimate inability to handle the excesses that accompanied the lifestyle of the rock aristocracy in the 1960s.

Thankfully, Paul Trynka devotes a substantial amount of time to discussing Brian Jones's upbringing, his family relationship, in an attempt to help us to gain an understand of the complexity of the man. We learn that Brian Jones was intellectually talented but that he struggled with a strained relationship with his parents who, unlike Jagger and Richards' parents, never acknowledged or supported Brian's musical ambitions. To Brian Jones, the Rolling Stones was the validation that he never received from his parents. It's not a surprise that Brian fell apart when his source of validation was usurped from him by Jagger and Richards at the behest of manager Andrew Loog Oldham.

That said, my view of Brian Jones's legacy resides in middle between Trynka's thesis that Brian Jones effectively WAS the Rolling Stones and the view disseminated by Jagger-Richards loyalists that he was a talented musician but merely a role player and that he had become a nuisance and fringe player that the band basically put up with until he was fired from the band in 1969 shortly before his tragic death. There is no question that Brian Jones was the critical piece in the band's direction and in its evolution.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
At long last a decent bio of Brian Jones, it does a good job of recalling the key events of the sixties Stones with a well needed pro-Jones stance that helps balance the rather lame memories of Keef and Loog Oldham. The only real downside to this book is that it lacks a greater insight into the music made and an understanding of how key Jones contributions to the Stones were in keeping them within reach of the Beatles through the sixties
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Format: Paperback
This is a very entertaining and informative book for those who love to read about the Stones history. It fills in a lot of the picture of Brian Jones, and for that reason, is well worth the read. It has one serious flaw, though: it is just too dripping in venom directed toward Mick and Keith. There are just too many eye-rolling moments in which Trynka kind of clumsily and spitefully puts the Glimmer Twins down.

I get that Trynka is making the case that Mick and Keith have indulged in some serious revisionist history in trying to dilute or write out Brian’s role as true founder and musical genius of the band. And much of what the author says is undoubtedly true.

But one gets the impression that he really hates those guys (as well as Andrew Oldham—who is pretty easy to hate), and/or is incensed beyond measure at their cold, calculated behavior toward Brian. That’s fine, and authors are certainly allowed to write from a particular perspective. But after a few pages, you start to wonder how much his animosity is clouding his judgment of the “facts”—and whether his version isn’t just as colored by personal agenda as is Keith Richards’ (also very entertaining) “Life.”

To his credit, Trynka is a great researcher. He weaves in the eyewitness perspectives of ton of people who were there. Too often, however, I felt that Trynka treated offhand statements (by not-necessarily-unbiased or reliable witnesses) as too authoritative so long as they support his narrative.

My main issue, though, is that the book is chock full of petty, kind of childish swipes. One example is found on page 172 of the US hardcover. He’s describing a magical scene in which Brian Jones, Bob Dylan, and Robbie Robertson are in a hotel room and a spontaneous jam session breaks out.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I must have read every book about Brian Jones and because this author has interviewed so many people who actually new Brian as apposed to third and forth hand, I am inclined to trust this book and its information regarding Brian more seriously. Brian was a complex man. He had a lot of hang-ups, but starting the Stones and making his kind of music was his dream. Then Andrew Oldham came along and once Jagger, Richards and Oldman got together, Brian's group was rapidly taken away from him. It is very hard to read how his life spun out of control and how he turned to drink and drugs to numb what was happening to him. Everyone who knows the story of Brian Jones will know what ultimately happened to him at a tragically young age of 27. As I said, Paul Trynka has found so many people who knew Brian first hand, from his school days until his last days. It was a good and interesting read, but very sad and depressing. How Jagger and Richards treated him was vicious to say the least and in this book it goes in to a lot more detail than many others such as Terry Rawlings book, Who Killed Christopher Robin
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