Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £5.69

Save £3.30 (37%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The Sweet Shop Owner by [Swift, Graham]
Audible Narration
Playing...
Loading...
Paused
Kindle App Ad

The Sweet Shop Owner Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£5.69

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Book Description

The first novel from the Booker Prize-winning author of Last Orders and Waterland.

Book Description

‘This beautifully balanced novel describes the arrangements, accommodations, pacts and treaties of our ordinary lives’ The Times In the sweet shop Willy Chapman was free, absolved from all responsibility, and he ran his sweet shop like his life – quietly, steadfastly, devotedly. It was a bargain struck between Chapman and his beautiful, emotionally injured wife – a bargain based on unexpressed, inexpressible love and on a courageous acceptance of life’s deprivation . . . threatened only by Dorry, their clever, angry, unforgiving daughter. ‘Moving . . . Through the succinctly evoked provincial decades one of the engrossing features is the difficulty of love and of communication between generations’ London Review of Books ‘A remarkable novel . . . There is a touch of Joyce in Graham Swift’s revelation of the hidden poetry of small men’s lives’ New York Times Book Review

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1160 KB
  • Print Length: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Picador (26 Jan. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0071MPH9Y
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #25,580 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
An exceptional first novel from an important novelist, thus 5 stars. Here, Graham Swift looks at boundaries: The narrow geographical boundaries of the small London suburb in which the story is set ("We never moved out of these narrow bounds. Born here, schooled here, worked here,") and the narrow emotional boundaries of his characters' relationships (The paragraph continues, "And even when I met her I stood here on the common and thought: enough, now everything is in its place, and I in mine.") The theme of narrow boundaries is deftly rendered in the relationship of the sweet-shop owner, Willie Chapman, and his wife Irene who, from the start, sets the limits of their relationship, and in the father/daughter and the mother/daughter relationships, all locked within narrow confines.
Swift is quoted as saying: "I think if you know that you have a talent, then . . . you should try not to dissipate it. You should try to hold onto it and keep it, concentrate it - not to do as the whole world tends to do these days, and diversify. Diversification doesn't work with art. Keep the old firm in business, don't go into other fields of trade." Although there are some who believe that his later work reveals a talent as a dramatist, may the "old firm" of novel writing thrive well into the future.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed this book, though I found it sad. Although there is no conclusive end, it does end fittingly. Graham Swift writes about emotions, feelings and thoughts with a great deal of conviction, and as one reviewer stated quoting from the author himself-he does have a talent and uses it-The use of contemporary newspaper headlines keeps the time scale in tact, and saves on other ways to show time that could be used. I have read other Graham Swift novels, and I have yet to be disappointed. A thoughtful and good book which highlights the difficulties that human beings face, and how they deal with them. If nothing else it shows the complexities of life and relationships.
1 Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
One thing I hate is books that end inconclusively, especially when you've had the patience and persistence to see it through to the last page. So it was with a feeling of great disappointment that I closed this book. Being something of a bookaholic I buy compulsively, far beyond the rate at which I read, and finding myself with several Graham Swift books I decided to start at the beginning with his first novel. The cover blurb describes it as a potential classic, however I notice that even Graham Swift fans amongst my friends don't seem to have heard of this particular title! I think this is one prediction that will not materialise.
Briefly it is the story of a couple from different backgrounds who meet in the interwar years, marry (despite opposition) and live their lives according to an unwritten agreement. She is wealthy and sets him up as a sweet shop owner; he is from more humble origins and worships her, and is happy to fulfil his side of the bargain. She has, however, had a devastating experience in her past and the third character in this novel is a constant reminder of that past. The unseen character, their daughter Dorry, is the casualty in all this and it is her story that we never really get to hear or understand. We have to draw our own conclusions from the unhappy ending. Perhaps Swift is trying to show us the failure of that generaton (his parents' generation?) to show love to their children even when deeply felt.
There are some beautifully observed descriptions of the minutiae of daily life, the petty jealousies of the workplace, the comforting routine of the working day, but overall it is a sad picture that Swift paints of lives wasted, not lived to the full.
I shall be interested to read other works by this author to see how he has evolved into the prize-winning writer he now is.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Everything Graham Swift writes is unputdownable beautifully written and perceptive. This book is no exception and for me it brought to life the familiar world of my childhood.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Cannot praise it enough! Having read and thoroughly appreciated the beautifully descriptive observations, I purchased it for friends and loved ones. It was received with the same appreciation!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover