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Sweet Child
 
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Sweet Child

10 Feb. 2010 | Format: MP3

6.59 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 7.74 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:23
30
2
4:05
30
3
2:59
30
4
3:52
30
5
4:07
30
6
3:48
30
7
4:57
30
8
3:11
30
9
3:37
30
10
2:22
30
11
3:14
30
12
6:27
30
13
3:48
30
14
2:59
30
15
4:45
30
16
4:17
30
17
6:00
30
18
2:59
30
19
3:24
Disc 2
30
1
5:11
30
2
2:40
30
3
2:25
30
4
2:47
30
5
5:05
30
6
2:13
30
7
4:25
30
8
3:48
30
9
2:40
30
10
5:19
30
11
2:39
30
12
3:48
30
13
4:16
30
14
4:39
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Format: Audio CD
I confess my bias: Pentangle struck right into my DNA and blew it open like no other music when their first album reached my 14-year old ears in 1967. I could never quite decide whether "1st" or "Sweet child" was the greatest, but had to concede that they gradually lost freshness, vitality and uniqueness on later albums before their phase petered out. This reissue solves my dilemma: The greatest songs and instrumentals from "1st", witness "Let no man steal your thyme", "Bells" and "Waltz", are all included in generous bonus sections, as live versions with even more looseness and drive than on the studio versions. Much has been written about the Renbourn-Jansch interplay. I will not add to it, suffice it to say that 35 years on it sounds fresher than ever, each note leaving the eager anticipation - what comes next? Jacqui McShee was at this point more an instrument than a voice, to incomparable effect, before she later mysteriously changed into an average folksinger, losing the strange objectivity her voice carries on these early tracks.This concert makes it clear that their rhythm section played a both larger and more important part in the group than they are often given credit for. Danny Thompson is a giant in his own right, but these tracks also bring Terry Cox`s melodic and creative drive to the fore, bringing forth the question of whether his relegation to ordinary backing folk-rock drummer may have been one factor in the strain of listlessness that crept into their playing on later albums. No one can accuse the material presented here of listlessness: A quiet intensity simmers and shimmers around and above the whole presentation, leaving each new musical turn meaningful.Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
This could be Pentangle's best album - 'Basket of Light' is the only other contender, but this one has much more material on it.

The first disc was recorded live in 1968 and the second is from the studio. The live show is great, with a mix of folk standards, originals and instrumentals showing great dexterity and skill from all involved. Bert Jansch and John Renbourn's version of Mingus' 'Goodbye Pork Pie Hat' is a standout instrumental tune - very relaxing and melodic. The studio set is a strong album in its own right, with highlights (for me) being the guitar duel of 'In Time', the morality tale 'Sovay' and the grooving 'I've Got A Feeling', which borrows the chord sequence from Miles Davis' 'All Blues'.

This expanded edition is a treat, fleshing out the concert to give what I believe is the complete show (minus tune-ups) plus a few alternate versions of the studio songs.

All in all, a monster package that should delight fans of the group as well as fans of acoustic music in general.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
It was 1968, and the group Pentangle had already had massive success with their debut album The Pentangle earlier in the year. It had been a busy time for all the members of the group both on their individual projects or collectively as a group and that was to continue as they recorded this second album for release at the end of the year.
Sweet Child is quite frankly an outstanding release. It was a double album. The first disc contained a live concert recorded at London’s festival Hall back in June. This was welcome since it also contained new songs by the group.
The album begins with the brilliant Market Song written by all the group members collectively. This is followed by the Traditional tune No more my lord. There is a cover of the Lewis song Turn your money green and then a cover of Haitian Fight Song by Mingus. After a new live version of the Jansch song A woman like you we get another live version of another song by Mingus, Goodbye Pork Pie Hat. A piece that John and Bert had recorded before as a duo. Track seven is brilliant. It echoes the material visited on John’s album Sir John Alot from earlier in the year. We get a medley of three tunes. The first is by composer C Gervaise, the second is Traditional and the third is by Byrd with the Earl of Salisbury.
We then get two traditional pieces that have outstanding arrangements. These are Watch the stars and So Early in Spring with McShee singing in a beautiful A cappella part. We finish the original first disc with a new version of No exit by Jansch and Renbourn, The time has come by Anne Briggs and a live version of Bruton Town.
The CD version continues with some extra tracks which is just excellent since it continues the rest of the concert that could not fit onto the original vinyl record.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
When I first heard this in the late 70s after the demise of Pentangle I much preferred the later albums Basket of Light and Solomon's Seal. Following John Renbourn's death I've listened to quite a few of his solo, duet and group recordings and decided I should re-appraise Sweet Child as the Pentangle's best reviewed album. I'm glad I did, and all I can think is that when I heard it before I wasn't ready for the diverse influences of jazz (Mingus and Miles in particular), blues, gospel and early music on an album filed as 'folk': the clarity of the remastered sound also helps.

The first disc is live, complete with spoken introductions and enthusiastic applause, which never get in the way of the music. The seven live bonus tracks from the same London concert result in a well filled disc which gives a real concert feel, and includes live versions of some standout tracks from their debut LP. The second Disc is studio recordings and the bonus tracks are alternate versions of four tracks already heard (interesting and enjoyable but not essential listening). Throughout there is music making of the highest order whether it's the full band or solo or duo items: Danny's solo bass on Haitian Fight Song, Terry's drum and vocal solo Moondog, Jacqui's unaccompanied So Early in the Spring all show Pentangle were not just about Bert and John's guitars. There's not a bad track on either CD and it's impossible to suggest anything as highlights . Although their other LPs had a handful of standout songs like Light Flight and Franklin, Sweet Child is a better introduction to their music than any compilation.
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