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Swami and Friends Hardcover – 31 Dec 1983

5.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 31 Dec 1983
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 184 pages
  • Publisher: William Heinemann Ltd (31 Dec. 1983)
  • ISBN-10: 0434496138
  • ISBN-13: 978-0434496136
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,158,040 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

This book by R.K. Narayan is just wonderful. It reminds us of our school days. The fun we had, our friends, the way we made friends, the exam fear, the eagerly awaited vacations, our kind principal, our strict but loving teachers, our punishments everything... It is just a marvel how a book written so long back can still connect to present days. It is just a wonderful book that will make you get serious, tickle you and make you laugh at the same time. Just get hold of this book and relive your childhood once again. --D Vinay on Feb 24, 2013

Great book to read and have in your collection. Captures your imagination and reminds you of childhood days. The language is simple and the humor is in good taste. Makes you wonder about one's own childhood and the author's insight of the things done during that period. Definitely a good buy. --Nagendra on Jun 17, 2012

this book is perfect for early teenagers in all respect. it has awesome stories and is the great work of R.K Narayanan so you can blindly go for it --Rohit Ranjan on Jul 12, 2015 --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

R. K. Narayan's writing spanned the greatest period of change in modern Indian history, from the days of the Raj with Swami and Friends (1935), The Bachelor of Arts (1937) and The English Teacher (1945), to recent years of political unrest - The Painter of Signs (1976), A Tiger for Malgudi (1983), and Talkative Man (1987). He has published numerous collections of short stories, including Malgudi Days (1982) and Under The Banyan Tree (1985), and several works of non-fiction. His most recent work is The Grandmother's Tale: Three Novellas (1993). R.K. Narayan died in 2001. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Swami, the son of a lawyer (who is the epitome of Indian respectability), and a truly Indian boy, entertains the reader from beginning to end. He and his friends and their exploits delight one as much as those of Richmal Crompton's William. At the same time, Narayan touches a deeper chord by the happenings that play a small, yet crucial role in Swami's life in the tiny,yet typical Indian town, Malgudi.
Swami's grandmother, his friends - the brawny, not very bright but very trustworthy Mani, the pompous Rajam, son of the Superintendent of police - Swami's attempts at arithmetic (how much he must pay for so many mangoes) under the stern guidance of his father, who refuses to see the point (how could he calculate unless he knew if the mangoes were ripe or not?!), the Malgudi Cricket Club, Swami being served food by his mother, all capture the world of a little Indian boy at the time when India was demanding Independence, beautifully. Narayan's story brings to the foreground world that is really India, which seems to continue to this day, and to which all historical happenings are but backgrounds. The story, being seen from Swami's point of view, is delightfully candid, normal, healthy and funny. But it and don't miss any of Narayan's other books, they are pure delight for anyone who loves a good story.
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Format: Paperback
This book was excellent! I was totally able to relate to little Swami and his various experiences at home, school and with his friends. R.K. Narayan's great sense of humor is also apparent in this novel. This is a must-read for anyone who wishes to understand the South Indian way of life.
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Format: Paperback
A delightful book of delightful days. Swami is schoolboy growing up in the shadow of the Quit India movement and he's all to willing a player in the freedom struggle especially if it means he gets to cut class. The author writes with a deft sense of humour and there were several laugh out loud moments in the book. His style is somewhat reminiscent of Graham Greene though this is an unfair comparison as they were near contemperies. The novel though light and entertaining novel has interesting political undertones. Well worth the read.
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