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The Sultan's Seal: na Paperback – 9 Mar 2006

3.9 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: W&N; Export ed edition (9 Mar. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0297852574
  • ISBN-13: 978-0297852575
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 2.7 x 23.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,097,107 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Set in nineteenth-century Istanbul, The Sultan's Seal lingers in the mind like the strong, delightful smell of an incense you will remember the next time you catch it in the air. -- Elif Shafak, author of The Saint of Incipient Insanities

Set in nineteenth-century Istanbul, The Sultan s Seal lingers in the mind like the strong, delightful smell of an incense you will remember the next time you catch it in the air. --Elif Shafak, author of The Saint of Incipient Insanities"

A passionate debut. . . . Lyrical . . . enchanting.

Starred Review. CSI goes Ottoman Empire . . . with readers easily transported back to those days when mystery and intrigue lurked around every corner.

Intricate and subtle as a Turkish carpet, lush as silk upon the skin. . . . A fascinating and remarkably knowledgeable look at a society in flux, its very appealing characters caught between East and West, Islam and Christianity, and bound in a web of murder and treachery that only the lucky few may escape.--Diana Gabaldon --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

A powerful blend of murder mystery and romance set in the Ottoman Court

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Jenny White, an anthropologist and the author of numerous nonfiction works on Turkish society and politics, has written a real winner with her debut novel, "The Sultan's Seal." A historical mystery with a bit of romance thrown in, this book makes for an unputdownable read! Ms. White paints a remarkably vivid portrait of life in 19th century Turkey, from the luxurious sultan's palaces to the most squalid slums of Istanbul, and writes intelligently of the political turmoil of the period.
Set in the ancient city "Stanbul" on the Bosphorus in the waning days of the Ottoman Empire, (1886), political intrigue, espionage and social upheaval are rife, even in the sultan's harem. "Young Turks," a reformist and strongly nationalist group of men, forced the restoration of the constitution of 1876. This new generation of Ottoman political thinkers were convinced that the Empire would never be truly modernized until it had adopted a democratic government and a constitution rather than undiluted power in the hands of the sultan. Gathering secretly in Istanbul, then in exile in Europe, "these reformers propagandized against the governments of Ali Pasha then, when Ali died in 1871, against the increasingly autocratic rule of Sultan Abdulaziz." There is a tremendous struggle taking place to find a middle ground between traditional values of the non-secular East and the very different, more progressive ways of the West.
Meanwhile, the Ottoman defeat in the war of 1877 against Russia imposed an indemnity of $100,000,000 on the Turkish government. By 1881 the whole empire went into receivership. "The British, French, Dutch, German, Austrian and Italian creditors set up the Council of Administration of the Ottoman Public Debt and took control of certain revenues.
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Format: Paperback
Set in Turkey during the Ottoman Empire, this story follows a top magistrate and the British ambassadors daughter who are trying to foil the mysterious murder of an Englishwoman, washed up on the banks of the Bosphorous. Set in the lavish palaces and harems of the Sultan, this was a neat, well-structured mystery. It was intricate and subtle and the plot never wavered, making it very sophisticated for a debut.

Packed with beautiful descriptions of eighteenth century Turkey, it portrayed an Oriental society and politics in flux. Traditional values and modernity collide, threatening the stability of the empire. A poetic story of betrayal, love, treachery and mystery
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Format: Hardcover
I agree that the descriptions are breathtaking and highly evocative but oh boy the plot. It takes for ever to get going and then leaves you hanging at the end with no clear idea of what happened and why. I thought it was me and read the last couple of chapters about four times to try and figure it out. Then I read some of the other reviews and realised with relief it wasn't me at all but the writing. The leisurely pace at the beginning sucks you in and then in a rush it's all over and you're left scratching your head in bewilderment- who killed Hannah? Who killed Mary? Was Janaan's mother another victim? Did the two main protagonists resolve their cultural and religious differences to find a way to be together???
Read it for the lovely descriptions, the atmosphere and the flavour of the declining Turkish empire, its customs and conflicts but be prepared to be disappointed if you're looking for a thrilling detective story- this isn't it
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By Brida TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 11 April 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read THE SULTAN'S SEAL in preparation for a bookclub meeting. Scanning the back of the book, the story looked promising enough; there was mystery, murder, romance and intrigue all set within the Ottoman Empire. However, as I slowly got further and further into the novel, I found myself becoming more and more distracted. I suppose it is because I was expecting the story to revolve around the death of the young woman and the investigation around her death. Instead, although this story was there, it felt as though it became more and more lost as the book progressed.
White is able to create a strong sense of place - the customs and the tradition of the Empire - yet, I personally did not feel as though she was able to do the same for her characters. Although I could remember the character Kamil Pasha - the man who is driving the investigation along - I found myself having to remind myself who the others were; had I been introduced to them before, or was this the first time I was encountering them?
What this comes down to, I believe, is the fact that THE SULTAN'S SEAL was not able to hold my attention as other books have. Usually when I read, I can find myself becoming completely lost in the story so that time passes without me noticing. Reading this, that did not happen. Because I could not connect with the characters, it left my reading experience very stale.
Sadly, I will not be recommending this book to anyone. As another reviewer has said, if you are looking for a murder mystery but set within an historical setting, you would do better to look elsewhere.
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Format: Hardcover
This book has many strengths - I loved the Ottoman setting - it evokes images of beautiful scenery and exotic customs and culture. The characters are well done, especially the detective Kamil and also main female characters, Janaan (niece of a respected Turkish scholar) and Sybil (the English Ambassador's daughter). I also enjoyed the descriptions of places and customs - the harems, coffee houses, bazaars, bath house etc.

So for me the strengths of this book are more about the time, place and location than about the plot. You get a wonderful flavour of the period and the setting of Istanbul during the decline of the Ottoman Empire and the fantastic wealth and opulence of the palaces and the political intrigue during a period of great change.

However, I wondered why White had chosen to write a detective thriller. She has made the plot line unnecessarily complicated; while all the threads are there, she lacks the skills as a writer to weave them into a strong picture for the reader. Parts of the story are well presented (particularly Janaan's story), but the political intrigue and the roles of various characters within it is muddled and doesn't come clear at the end - so we are left wondering who exactly killed whom and why!

My personal view is that it's a pity White didn't concentrate on those descriptions of people, place and culture that she does so well and keep the plot simpler.
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