• RRP: £19.99
  • You Save: £3.41 (17%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
The Suffragette Bombers: ... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Wordery
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Receive this fine as new book in 4-5 working days. Shipped from our UK supplier, via Royal Mail. We do not ship to Denmark.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Suffragette Bombers: Britain's Forgotten Terrorists Hardcover – 2 Jul 2014

4.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£16.58
£9.87 £11.08
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£16.58 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • The Suffragette Bombers: Britain's Forgotten Terrorists
  • +
  • Suffragettes: How Britain's Women Fought & Died for the Right to Vote
Total price: £26.56
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Pen & Sword Books Ltd (2 July 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1783400641
  • ISBN-13: 978-1783400645
  • Product Dimensions: 15.7 x 2.5 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 613,234 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Simon Webb is the author of a number of non-fiction books, ranging from academic works on education to popular history. He also writes for various magazines and newspapers, including the Times Educational Supplement, Daily Telegraph, Guardian and Independent.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"To the victors go the spoils." We think of feminism as a force for good, do we not? Schoolchildren have, for decades, been taught that Britain's 'Suffragette' movement was a grass-roots rabble of justifiably angry women who fought patriarchal oppression to secure emancipation in Parliamentary elections. It is, like most popular history, complete drivel. Feminism, a disease of extreme privilege, successfully revised the truth of this sociopathic cult who fought AGAINST universal voting enfranchisement and used every violent means at its disposal to try and achieve those ends.

People have, for almost a century, been indoctrinated into the notion of the women of the WSPU being 'brave' and yet brutally treated by police in their 'struggle.' In fact, the women of the group were the among the richest, most spoiled and privileged, proto-Fascist cowards in society (many of them genuinely deranged) who committed countless attacks of counterproductive and costly violence and even used cars to do so - at a time when almost nobody could afford such a luxury. These serious criminals were treated, as women always have been, with remarkable leniency. Some prisoners (who, had they been male, would never have been seen again and many even hanged) were indeed force-fed in custody - as not to let them die. Interesting how the acts of decency and brutality have been reversed to sell feminism as the opposite of what it is.

Emmeline Pankhurst should rightfully be viewed today in the same light as any other mass-murderer, but with perhaps special contempt for having delayed women's full voting enfranchisement and special mockery for being so poor at setting off bombs and actually killing people. The fact that so few lives WERE ended by her cult should never overshadow its intentions.
Read more ›
1 Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have only received this book recently and have not finished reading it, but feel I must offer some defence of my father's cousin Mabel Capper who is pictured therein and described as a typical suffragette terrorist.

Whereas she might be somewhat flattered by the notoriety were she alive today and I cannot refute her involvement in what was known in 1912 as the Dublin outrages. It is nevertheless the case that she was acquitted at the subsequent trial where she and her three 'co-conspirators' faced charges including attempted arson and explosions at the Theatre Royal where the Prime Minister, Herbert Asquith was due to make a speech on the Home Rule Bill.

The author is correct in his description of the 'conspiracy', and the serious nature of the charges was reflected in the sentences of five years penal servitude for her friends Gladys Evans and Mary Leigh. The fourth defendant was sentenced to seven months imprisonment.

Mable Capper was certainly involved in many militant acts for the cause and indeed she described herself as a soldier. However I know that her activities caused no loss of life and I think that the only life lost in all the Suffragettes' campaigns was that of Emily Wilding Davidson.

The author asserts that innocent people were hurt in the general turmoil around the campaign and again this is true. However in many cases those most affected were the Suffragettes themselves. Four years before the events in Dublin, at the age of just 20, Mabel was brutally fed by force when on hunger strike at Winson Green prison. Many times she and her fellow 'terrorists' were attacked by mobs when appealing for women's' suffrage at otherwise peaceful rallies.
Read more ›
1 Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
While doing some research prior to delivering the PREVENT [anti-radicalisation] training to my NHS colleagues, I did a quick internet search and came across this book. It was a fascinating bit of holiday reading - very accessible and easy to read and yet fascinating and compelling reading. I couldn't out it down. It provides an alternative view of the history of the suffragettes and casts real questions about whether we have a distorted view of these women who are idolised as feminist heroines.
He argues that this group were only interested in votes for 'ladies' only - the upper classes, those with a university education and those who actually owned property. He argues that they put the cause of women's suffrage back by several years. He argues that this 'terrorist group' nearly brought the government of the day to its knees.
Is he right? Buy or borrow the book and read it for yourself.
I really enjoyed it.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Webb appears to be an author who has swallowed all the modern media mythology about 'terrorism'. This book has accounts of outrages, typically from 1909 to early 1914--explosions and/or arson in barracks, churches, libraries, and public buildings. I'd ask serious historians to consider the hypothesis that these explosions were carried out secretly by Jews, leaving behind false flag tokens--books, letters, 'clues', written notes, things supposed to be part of the lives of white ladies.

Why the hell would anyone want to do something so repellent? I think probably part of the motive was to make people feel nervous and worried and apprehensive: in short, to make them follow the authorities. The feeling must have been: What could happen next? Certainly when war 'broke out', as the evasive phrase has it--in fact, Britain declared war--the suffragettes made peace with Lloyd George. And there was a newspaper campaign suggesting men needed war, civilisation was jaded and dull, battle was a cleansing influence. I'd suggest that Jews had a history of bomb throwing; consider 1905 in Russia. It's hard to believe genteel Englishwomen were skilled in the use of the then-new dynamite; whereas so-called 'anarchists', a code-word for Jews from eastern Europe. And the targets--churches (Christian artefacts are hated by Jews), libraries (full of non-Talmudic material, hated by Jews), splendid public buildings and country houses (evidence of white skills, hated by Jews), and barracks (white soldiers - hated by Jews), make sense as part of a Jewish campaign.

Webb writes: '... no responsibility for these two attacks was claimed by the WSPU, it is hard to know who else could have been to blame. The suffragettes were the only terrorist group operating in Britain at that time.
Read more ›
130 Comments One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I cannot recommend this book enough! 4 Dec. 2015
By ThrillCozby - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Extraordinary book on a topic that tends to be glossed over in most histories. The author makes his case that the Suffragettes should not be remembered as the women who secured the right to vote for womankind but should be remembered as the architects and agents of the first terrorist campaign in Britain and he proves his point with an extensive bibliography. I would love to see the author write more on the myths associated with gender relations prior to the modern age because it is so difficult to get another side to the story today. Pick up this book and make it a part of your library you will not be disappointed.
1 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars False Flags? Explosions in Britain Attributed to Suffragettes before the 'Great War' 13 Sept. 2015
By Rerevisionist - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
This book has accounts of outrages, typically from 1909 to early 1914--explosions and/or arson in barracks, churches, libraries, and public buildings. I'd ask serious historians to consider the hypothesis that these explosions were carried out secretly by Jews, leaving behind false flag tokens--books, letters, 'clues', written notes, things supposed to be part of the lives of white ladies.

Why the hell would anyone want to do something so repellent? I think probably part of the motive was to make people feel nervous and worried and apprehensive: in short, to make them follow the authorities. The feeling must have been: What could happen next? Certainly when war 'broke out', as the evasive phrase has it--in fact, Britain declared war--the suffragettes made peace with Lloyd George. And there was a newspaper campaign suggesting men needed war, civilisation was jaded and dull, battle was a cleansing influence.

Jews had a history of bomb throwing; consider 1905 in Russia. It's hard to believe genteel Englishwomen were skilled in the use of the then-new dynamite; whereas so-called 'anarchists', a code-word for Jews from eastern Europe. And the targets--churches (Christian artefacts are hated by Jews), libraries (full of non-Talmudic material, hated by Jews), splendid public buildings and country houses (evidence of white skills, hated by Jews), and barracks (white soldiers - hated by Jews), make sense as part of a Jewish campaign.

Webb writes: '... no responsibility for these two attacks was claimed by the WSPU, it is hard to know who else could have been to blame. The suffragettes were the only terrorist group operating in Britain at that time.' Note the phrasing: 'no responsibility was claimed'; note that no evidence seems to have been found, either. Webb maintains the destructiveness of these attacks has been underestimated, or forgotten. An alternative interpretation is that, having helped achieve war, retrospective propaganda would simply omit them once their work had been done, in case people might guess, and investigate, what really happened.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback