FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Sucking Eggs: What Your W... has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK. Your order will be picked, packed and dispatched by Amazon. Buy with confidence!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Sucking Eggs: What Your Wartime Granny Could Teach You about Diet, Thrift and Going Green Hardcover – 7 May 2009

3.4 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£12.99
£3.99 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£12.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Chatto & Windus; First edition (7 May 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0701182407
  • ISBN-13: 978-0701182403
  • Product Dimensions: 15.9 x 2.5 x 21.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 951,433 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

`ambitious and systematic... she has made a serious study of government-imposed austerity in the Forties' -- Observer Evening Standard

`charming and perceptive romp through the ration books...
She has come up with some gems.' -- Sunday Times

`if you want to triumph over debt, beat the bulge and win the race to go green, then Nicol provides the answer' -- Scottish Woman

Review

`charming and perceptive romp through the ration books...
She has come up with some gems.'

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a long review but please persevere! Since others are all glowing I want to state my thoughts as comprenhensively as possible.

Based on other reviews I was looking forward to reading this book, expecting some hints and tips and a translation of wartime thrift into steps we can take today; as it says on the cover "what your wartime granny could teach you about diet, thrift and going green".

But I was very disappointed and this book did not deliver what was promised on the cover. The book is more a historical documentary about arrangements during the war years of a general nature. It may be interesting to someone who has no knowledge whatsoever about the war years but other books are much better.

There are bullet points at the end of each section, hints what one can do now, such as buy local,grow your own, in a restaurant choose locally sourced food (in which case why go to a restaurant?!), drink tap water and so on. But we all know that, don't we?

I felt there were serious omissions. For example:- There was no mention of drinking beer from your local breweries or wine from the UK. Or better still make your own. Home made ginger beer is fantastic - kids love it. Cooking your own food from fresh ingredients instead of buying ready-made is important, picking wild blackberries, find a local butcher who sources his meat locally and has a delivery round in your area.

I was expecting to find suggestions about how we can bring wartime thrift into our present day kitchens, for example how to keep food warm without using the oven, how to eek out a few ounces of meat to feed a family and still have leftovers for tomorrow.
Read more ›
Comment 32 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Patricia Nicol has written an amusing and informative book. I chose it as a birthday present for my Dad and read it before I posted it. She has unearthed loads of interesting facts and compared our daily lives with those of our war time grandparents. I particularly enjoyed the lighthearted tone because even though 'green is good' it can be hard work too. There are handy hint sections - full of good ideas. I think this is a great present for everyone because it is topical as well as historical.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I had thought that this would be more of a guide to what people can do to be green, rather than the history of wartime (and post-war) rationing and resourcefulness. However, it was a really good read and I throughly enjoyed it. The author has researched the topic well and there is an account at the end of her own attempts to live within the wartime clothes ration. The book does make you think and I wish everyone would read it, especially the people who insist on driving their children the half mile to school each day!
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I really enjoyed this; I was worried that it would be a bit hard going and hectoring, but it is actually a delightfully written social history that every now and then segues into the present. I've been reading quite a lot of WWI and WWII history of late and this was a fine addition, giving a real flavour to the home front but also addressing more current concerns.

Also it looks gorgeous and is a satisfyingly hefty hard back so I think if you have a granny and you haven't got her this, well shame on you; think of all those potatoes she had to eat and all that make-doing-and-mending that she had to do and this is how you repay her?
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This was a good read and had interesting information if you can accept the rather 'preachy' tone. I enjoyed the ideas put forward and the way they linked back to the wartime past. There were some really good suggestions but personally I found the 'save the planet' tone a bit intrusive. Some of the suggestions in this book were a bit self righteous and assumed that everyone agreed with the notion of 'global warming' etc etc. I expected it to be more factual and informative and less like a teacher telling you what to do.
However well worth a read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
This book is written in an awful condescending way, treating the reader like an idiot. The writing style is just terrible. The book itself tries to relate wartime "make do and mend" with 21st century living to make ends meet. Don't be taken in that this will be full of interesting stuff about how people lived during the Second World War. It isn't. The content of this book is just basic stuff that even a 5 year old child would know. And then it is written in a way which insults the reader, by the author trying to get cheap laughs about how "aren't we all so ignorant now about how things were in the war", but really there is nothing new being told. Terrible book in terms of content and written style.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Guides to beat the recession are two-a-penny at the moment and this offering reads like it was built from the title up, which is often a recipe for disaster, with or without powdered egg.

As other reviews have mentioned; vast swaths of the book are filled with extracts from other works, which only goes to remind the reader that there are better written and researched books out there that you could be digesting instead of this mediocre affair.

There are glaring mistakes; both grammatical and historical, while the writing style meanders from gratingly ingratiating to out and out dull.

Ms Nicol betrays her life as a journalist in all the ways writing puff piece copy for years can abuse writing style. It is also worth mentioning that the quotes heaping praise on the front and back cover of the book are mainly from publications she has written for in the past, so the integrity of the Murdoch press remains undiminished on this score as with many others.

The whole enterprise comes across as a desperate attempt to become an author without a clue of what to write about or how. I get the impression that the author has never had to live frugally in her life and whatever her grandmother could tell her would fall on deaf ears.

In conclusion this book is so bad that I found myself half wishing for world war three just so it could be superseded.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback