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Study in Terror [DVD] [1965] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

3.7 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

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Region 1 encoding. (This DVD will not play on most DVD players sold in the UK [Region 2]. This item requires a region specific or multi-region DVD player and compatible TV. More about DVD formats)
Note: you may purchase only one copy of this product. New Region 1 DVDs are dispatched from the USA or Canada and you may be required to pay import duties and taxes on them (click here for details) Please expect a delivery time of 5-7 days.

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  • Study in Terror [DVD] [1965] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
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Product details

  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0048NRQH0
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 210,993 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

DVD-R

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
A study in terror revolves around Sherlock Holmes up against the infamous Jack the Ripper in the backstreets of Victorian London. A cast of well-known stars including Anthony Quayle, Robert Morley, Frank Finley and stage actor John Neville as the notorious sleuth. The harsh colour and ghostly music adds to the gritty realism of the period. Another similar and maybe more sophisticated movie is Murder by Decree which deals with pretty much the same plot but delves deeper into the workings of the Masonic conspiracies. A good transfer onto DVD including the original theatrical trailer makes this a recommended purchase.
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Format: DVD
A Study in Terror is directed by James Hill and written by Derek and Donald Ford. Based on characters created by Arthur Conan Doyle, it stars John Neville, Donald Houston, John Fraser, Anthony Quale, Frank Finlay and Adrienne Corri. Music is by John Scott and cinematography by Desmond Dickinson. Out of Compton Films it's an Eastman Color production. Plot pitches intrepid sleuth Sherlock Holmes (Neville) against notorious serial killer Jack the Ripper.

On paper it's a filmic match made in heaven, two characters as well known as they are invariably different. One a great work of fiction, the other infamously true and dastardly. Yet the story is flat, not that it doesn't lack for quality in execution, it just lacks any suspense or dramatic verve to fully make it worthy of further visits. Cast are mostly very good, especially Neville, who makes for a lithe and autocratic Holmes, while Alex Vetchinsky's sets are period supreme. The Eastman Color, too, is a plus point, British horror always tended to have a better sheen to it in the Eastman Color lenses, so it be here for the dark deeds played out in Whitechapel, London, 1888. But ultimately, and in spite of it being an intelligent spin on the Ripper legend, story doesn't play out well enough to make it a classic of either the Ripper or Holmes cinema adaptations. 6/10
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Many people might find this film a little slow and timid by modern standards. However, people who like Hammer style horror should enjoy this film. There are decent performances from the main cast ( Barbara Windsor aside) and a good plot. Worth buying for a bit of old fashioned horror.
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Format: DVD
this is easily my favourite ripper film,its not in anyway factual but is the most enjoyable film of this kind.a good cast and good story with a brilliant ending put this movie top of my list,babs windsor is great and a bumbling watson is enjoyable to watch.this is a must have dvd for horror fans of the classic kind,its not cheap to buy but worth every penny.
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Format: VHS Tape
Sherlock is hot on the trail of Jack the Ripper. The likely suspects are all gradually eliminated until the final blazing confrontation. The director of this movie has created a true work of brilliance. Never have the sights, sounds and eeriness of a dark, dingy and smog filled London been depicted so authentically in a movie. There is a gritty realism thoughout that is superbly supported by a pompous Holmes/Watson combination. All the sets are terrific as are the performances. Perhaps the plot could have been deeper but this is a minor criticism which just prevents a 5/5. This film shines because of the exceptional recreation of a time and a place long since lost to progress. This is a must see if you like atmosphere and realism.
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Format: DVD
A Study in Terror was Sherlock Holmes' first big screen encounter with Jack the Ripper - they would lock horns again a couple of decades later in the much better Murder by Decree - but its one that adds up to rather less than the talents involved would lead you to suspect. Coming from exploitation producer Herman Cohen, he of such gems as I Was a Teenage Werewolf and Konga, the biggest surprise is that it isn't called I Was a Teenage Consulting Detective. It's a surprisingly elegant production which plays down most of the potential for cheap thrills (though it does hype up the murders with trailer-friendly lines like "You'll never see anything like it this side of Hell") and looks like it's had a more than its fairly modest £160,000 budget spent on it, not least due to some gorgeously rich Eastmancolour photography that exploits the various studio backlots and standing sets economically pressed into service. It's less concerned with historical accuracy or offering a solution that stands up to much scrutiny and it's not exactly a taxing mystery, more of a watchable programmer.

John Neville was a fine actor but is a strangely anonymous Holmes on first acquaintance, though his performance grows on you with subsequent viewings (he would be much closer in spirit in his guest starring role as a Joseph Bell-like doctor in ITV's The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes a few years later) while Donald Houston makes an easily pleased Watson, overdoing the delighted hero-worshipping schoolboy act at times.
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By Brit Boy TOP 500 REVIEWER on 7 Jan. 2016
Format: DVD
With two characters, one fact, and one fiction, 1965's 'A Study in Terror' took on the interesting concept of what would happen had London's famous super-sleuth Sherlock Holmes and his trusty sidekick Dr. Watson gone on the trail of the infamous killing machine Jack the Ripper in London.

Predictably, this is a flawed re-telling of the Ripper case in terms of a factually accurate account, but there is a running comedy element throughout which does make a fairly entertaining film. Personally, I'd say that this was a 'Sherlock Holmes' movie primarily, with the Jack the Ripper elements coming in second. This was the first time that Holmes would encounter Jack, the next would be in 1979 with the superior movie 'Murder by Degree', which benefited from a bigger budget.

John Neville stars as our Holmes, and plays him respectfully, along with Donald Houston as Watson, who is portrayed here as a generous hearted buffoon. Other famous faces in the impressive cast include John Fraser, Anthony Quayle, Robert Morley, and Frank Finley, as well as a young Judy Dench looking lovely, and the soon to be Dame Barbara Windsor in her pre-'Carry On' days as a ridiculous caricature of the Ripper's unfortunate victim Annie Chapman. Ms. Windsor's so-called 'acting' is just as awful as virtually everything I've seen her in, but then that's Babs for you. Thankfully, she isn't in it for very long, and at least the rest of the players do turn in good performances.

The low-budget 'A Study in Terror' certainly falls into a higher category of B movie, and is genuinely atmospheric with it's garish shots of the good Victorian London setting. It's also engaging, fast-paced, and ends with a satisfying conclusion.
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