FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
A Study in Scarlet: AND T... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This book is in very good condition and will be shipped within 24 hours of ordering. The cover may have some limited signs of wear but the pages are clean, intact and the spine remains undamaged. This book has clearly been well maintained and looked after thus far. Money back guarantee if you are not satisfied. See more of our deals.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

A Study in Scarlet: AND The Sign of Four (Dover Thrift Editions) Paperback – 1 Dec 2003

4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£2.99
£0.45 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£2.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Dover Publications Inc.; New edition edition (1 Dec. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0486431665
  • ISBN-13: 978-0486431666
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 1.5 x 20.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,353,278 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Arthur Conan Doyle was a prolific writer born in Scotland who started out as a medical doctor. While at the University of Edinburgh, he augmented his income by writing stories. His first Sherlock Holmes tale was published in 1887, introducing one of literature's best-loved detectives. Doyle has also written many works of history and science fiction, plus plays and poetry.


Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Not quite as good as say Hound of the Baskervilles or the later novels but it is still a really engaging and entertaining novel, really well woven plots that keep you guessing and excellently informative with regards to the background of the stories, a must for any Conan Doyle fan
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
My first Conan Doyle. Good stories. Good price, especially for the first two Holmes novels in the same volume, but the paper is very poor quality.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars 19 reviews
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dr Watson, I'd like you to meet Mr Sherlock Holmes! 18 Jun. 2007
By Paul Weiss - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
As Agatha Christie's "The Mysterious Affair at Styles" introduced a grateful reading public to Hercule Poirot, perhaps the second best known fictional detective of all time, Conan Doyle's "A Study in Scarlet" marked the debut appearance of the acknowledged master of detection, the one and only Sherlock Holmes!

John Watson, a medical doctor recently retired from the British military to recover his health and recuperate from wounds received in Afghanistan, is looking to stretch his limited budget by finding another gentleman with whom he can share accommodation. When a mutual friend introduced him to Sherlock Holmes, one might slyly suggest that the game was afoot and the rest, as they also say, became history. Already characteristically melancholy and moody, a jaded Holmes, who labeled himself the world's only consulting detective, is invited by Scotland Yard's Lestrade and Gregson to assist in the investigation of a baffling pair of murders.

With "A Study in Scarlet", Doyle is clearly new to the craft of writing mysteries and the great detective's debut outing suffers from characteristic first novel and new character jitters. The style itself is markedly different from everything that follows in the Holmes canon with the story being told from a third-party perspective. The background to the mystery is revealed through the mechanism of a flashback to the western USA at the time of the Mormon migration to Utah. Feedback from the reading public must have been immediate and - we'll have to hand it to Doyle - he must have been a quick learner. Watson was thereafter appointed official narrator and diarist to the master and Doyle never looked back.

I leave it to others smarter than I to judge whether or not Doyle's historical characterization of the Mormons is justified or accurate! Suffice it to say, that the mystery is entertaining but the details are, quite frankly, entirely unimportant beside the overwhelming fact that this was the first time the world heard the name "Sherlock Holmes". It took Doyle only a few pages for example to treat us to an aphorism that we would come to hear over and over again, "It is a capital mistake to theorize before you have all the evidence."

This novel is a cornerstone in the annals of crime fiction, an extremely important piece of the history of English literature and a darned good read! Enjoy it!

Paul Weiss
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another Mormon reader chimes in . . . 31 May 2007
By Chad - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I recently picked up THE ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES, which has been sitting on my shelf for over a year and I'm glad I did. The first book in the compendium of his early works is A STUDY IN SCARLET, to which I restrict my comments.

The story is broken into two parts. The first chronicles the murder and pursuit by Holmes, the second provides the background and motive for the murder and ultimately the resolution of the case.

A STUDY IN SCARLET is the first of many Sherlock Holmes novels and is a good place to start if you, like me, are aware of Holmes' preeminent status as the literary world's best detective, but have not yet taken the opportunity to read his adventures.

The first book introduces Holmes and Watson and chronicles how they came to be companions. It also gives an insight into the pains Holmes has taken to develop his sleuthing skills. This introduction is intriguing and will pull you along until the crime is discovered, at which point you'll be hooked.

The development of the rest of the first part is equally intriguing as the mystery becomes clearer and clearer to Holmes, though no more clear to the reader. One is truly impressed by all that is "elementary"* to Mr. Holmes, but imperceptible to we mere mortals.

The second part of the book takes place primarily in Utah at the time the valley was settled by the Mormons. Brigham Young and the burgeoning Mormon society are menacing and effectively occupy the role of the antagonist for the second part.

For those unfamiliar with the Latter-Day Saints, please note that this account is purely a work a historical fiction and is wholly inaccurate in its depiction of Brigham Young, Salt Lake City, and Mormons at large. For that, I deduct a star for the hazard it may present to those unaware of the true character of the Mormon faith. Personally, I found the second part more distasteful than will the average reader because I am a proud Latter-day Saint.

Still, with these flaws, the book is a wonderful introduction to a literary character with whom all should be familiar. I recommend the book.

* I must say that I was disappointed to find Holmes' catch-phrase "it's elementary my dear Watson" missing from this volume (though I don't deduct any stars for its absence). Surely, it appears in later works. I was waiting for it, but, alas, it didn't appear.
5.0 out of 5 stars Two Long Stories from Arthur Conan Doyle 18 Sept. 2015
By Acute Observer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A Study in Scarlet & The Sign of the Four

This book contains two novellas from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: “A Study in Scarlet” and “The Valley of Fear”. These and others came from the prolific pen of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. There were many movies that adapted these stories. They are examples of “the locked room mystery”.

“A Study in Scarlet” begins when John H. Watson M.D. is looking for reasonable lodgings. So too Sherlock Holmes (described as cold blooded in outlook). A letter requests help from Holmes. Drebber was found dead in an empty house, no wound on the body, but blood in the room. Holmes & Watson inspect the scene; Holmes explains his deductions. An advertisement is placed in the “Found” column of a newspaper. Detective Gregson visited Holmes to explain how he solved the murder. Lestrade arrives to tell of another murder: Stangerson, Drebber’s secretary ! Gregson’s suspect could not have done it. Holmes shows his brilliance by his surprise introduction of the murderer! Part 2 tells about the events that preceded these murders. Chapter 7 explains Holmes’ actions in reasoning backwards. This story introduced Sherlock Holmes to an audience that never tired of these stories. Note the dialogue followed by explanatory comments. More modern stories use mostly dialogue to carry the story along and bring out the facts. The solution occurs in the last chapters. The use of an exotic American locale was a way to add interest. Background descriptions are sparse. It tells why a man can have a “florid face”, a medical fact.

“The Valley of Fear” begins when Inspector MacDonald arrives with news of the horrible murder of Mr. Douglas of Birlstone Manor House, which is isolated by a forty foot moat. Douglas came from golden California a wealthy man. A shotgun blast destroyed his face, only a brand on his arm identified him. Holmes talks to the people involved, he knows some are lying. He is able to solve this killing. This leads to Part 2, a fictionalized story of the anthracite coal wars in 1870s Pennsylvania. Violence during a long strike was answered with violence by the miners. A Pinkerton agent infiltrated the miner’s union, gained their confidence, and began collecting evidence. [No mention of any agent provocateurs to create crimes.] This miner’s group was called the “Mollie Maguires” [but they never used this phrase]. This group was caught in the act, convicted, and hanged. During another recession the mine owner was dismissed from his position and later died a suicide. [This story is little known, a good history book will educate you.]
5.0 out of 5 stars Two Long Stories from Arthur Conan Doyle 18 Sept. 2015
By Acute Observer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A Study in Scarlet & The Sign of the Four

This book contains two novellas from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: “A Study in Scarlet” and “The Valley of Fear”. These and others came from the prolific pen of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. There were many movies that adapted these stories. They are examples of “the locked room mystery”.

“A Study in Scarlet” begins when John H. Watson M.D. is looking for reasonable lodgings. So too Sherlock Holmes (described as cold blooded in outlook). A letter requests help from Holmes. Drebber was found dead in an empty house, no wound on the body, but blood in the room. Holmes & Watson inspect the scene; Holmes explains his deductions. An advertisement is placed in the “Found” column of a newspaper. Detective Gregson visited Holmes to explain how he solved the murder. Lestrade arrives to tell of another murder: Stangerson, Drebber’s secretary ! Gregson’s suspect could not have done it. Holmes shows his brilliance by his surprise introduction of the murderer! Part 2 tells about the events that preceded these murders. Chapter 7 explains Holmes’ actions in reasoning backwards. This story introduced Sherlock Holmes to an audience that never tired of these stories. Note the dialogue followed by explanatory comments. More modern stories use mostly dialogue to carry the story along and bring out the facts. The solution occurs in the last chapters. The use of an exotic American locale was a way to add interest. Background descriptions are sparse. It tells why a man can have a “florid face”, a medical fact.

“The Valley of Fear” begins when Inspector MacDonald arrives with news of the horrible murder of Mr. Douglas of Birlstone Manor House, which is isolated by a forty foot moat. Douglas came from golden California a wealthy man. A shotgun blast destroyed his face, only a brand on his arm identified him. Holmes talks to the people involved, he knows some are lying. He is able to solve this killing. This leads to Part 2, a fictionalized story of the anthracite coal wars in 1870s Pennsylvania. Violence during a long strike was answered with violence by the miners. A Pinkerton agent infiltrated the miner’s union, gained their confidence, and began collecting evidence. [No mention of any agent provocateurs to create crimes.] This miner’s group was called the “Mollie Maguires” [but they never used this phrase]. This group was caught in the act, convicted, and hanged. During another recession the mine owner was dismissed from his position and later died a suicide. [This story is little known, a good history book will educate you.]
5.0 out of 5 stars Two Long Stories from Arthur Conan Doyle 18 Sept. 2015
By Acute Observer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A Study in Scarlet & The Sign of the Four

This book contains two novellas from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: “A Study in Scarlet” and “The Valley of Fear”. These and others came from the prolific pen of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. There were many movies that adapted these stories. They are examples of “the locked room mystery”.

“A Study in Scarlet” begins when John H. Watson M.D. is looking for reasonable lodgings. So too Sherlock Holmes (described as cold blooded in outlook). A letter requests help from Holmes. Drebber was found dead in an empty house, no wound on the body, but blood in the room. Holmes & Watson inspect the scene; Holmes explains his deductions. An advertisement is placed in the “Found” column of a newspaper. Detective Gregson visited Holmes to explain how he solved the murder. Lestrade arrives to tell of another murder: Stangerson, Drebber’s secretary ! Gregson’s suspect could not have done it. Holmes shows his brilliance by his surprise introduction of the murderer! Part 2 tells about the events that preceded these murders. Chapter 7 explains Holmes’ actions in reasoning backwards. This story introduced Sherlock Holmes to an audience that never tired of these stories. Note the dialogue followed by explanatory comments. More modern stories use mostly dialogue to carry the story along and bring out the facts. The solution occurs in the last chapters. The use of an exotic American locale was a way to add interest. Background descriptions are sparse. It tells why a man can have a “florid face”, a medical fact.

“The Valley of Fear” begins when Inspector MacDonald arrives with news of the horrible murder of Mr. Douglas of Birlstone Manor House, which is isolated by a forty foot moat. Douglas came from golden California a wealthy man. A shotgun blast destroyed his face, only a brand on his arm identified him. Holmes talks to the people involved, he knows some are lying. He is able to solve this killing. This leads to Part 2, a fictionalized story of the anthracite coal wars in 1870s Pennsylvania. Violence during a long strike was answered with violence by the miners. A Pinkerton agent infiltrated the miner’s union, gained their confidence, and began collecting evidence. [No mention of any agent provocateurs to create crimes.] This miner’s group was called the “Mollie Maguires” [but they never used this phrase]. This group was caught in the act, convicted, and hanged. During another recession the mine owner was dismissed from his position and later died a suicide. [This story is little known, a good history book will educate you.]
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback