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Street Use and the Law Paperback – 30 Jun 2006

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Sweet and Maxwell (30 Jun. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0721916805
  • ISBN-13: 978-0721916804
  • Package Dimensions: 20.4 x 14.6 x 0.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,246,016 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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By Phillip Taylor MBE TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 17 Dec. 2008
This unique book, which fits into the pocket nicely, is a succinct, quick-reference guide to the legal problems affecting our streets.

It's a great pity that it was not available to me when I was an elected councillor because so much of what is in the book make up the type of personal cases which many urban councillors confront on a daily basis.

So. Who is the book aimed at? Everybody! It looks at street use by individuals such as drivers, pedestrians, contractors, cyclists and dog owners. It investigates potential dangers, conflicts of interest, and public nuisances occurring in our everyday environment. In short, it is an invaluable guide for members of the public with local residents' problems, community safety practitioners, residents' associations, planners and those affected by planning applications, and lawyers handling personal injury and nuisance litigation.

I see `Street Use and the Law' as an easy-to-use manual which lists each topic alphabetically, and has a comprehensive index which gives the reader quick access to the appropriate legislation. Fundamentally, it is not a `heavyweight' legal publication but more in the way of a legal `ready reckoner' (in the non-arithmetic sense, so you can breathe a sigh of relief!) where each topic points to those parts of a statute which is appropriate to the topic, and it summarises effectively what the law contains in each relevant Act.

There will be critics of this little book, which is really a manual or guide, but I am not one of them. It is long overdue for the `community' book market and a welcome friend to it. With so much going on at street level in our society, it is not surprising that areas of contention arise from street usage.
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This book is very much a brief summary of the law and refers you to the relevant legislation. It does cover a very wide range of subjects from parking to dog fouling and anti-social behaviour plus much more. Each subject is covered in only a few pages so don't expect a full explanation of the subject. It is however a very useful starting point. Ideal for Council clerks or Councillors
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review
5.0 out of 5 stars Surveying.... 29 May 2014
By Phillip Taylor MBE - Published on Amazon.com
STREET CRED

An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers

This unique book, which fits into the pocket nicely, is a succinct, quick-reference guide to the legal problems affecting our streets. It’s a great pity that it was not available to me when I was an elected councillor because so much of what is in the book make up the type of personal cases which many urban councillors confront on a daily basis.

Who is the book aimed at?

Everybody! It looks at street use by individuals such as drivers, pedestrians, contractors, cyclists and dog owners. It investigates potential dangers, conflicts of interest, and public nuisances occurring in our everyday environment. In short, it is an invaluable guide for members of the public with local residents’ problems, community safety practitioners, residents’ associations, planners and those affected by planning applications, and lawyers handling personal injury and nuisance litigation.

We see ‘Street Use and the Law’ as an easy-to-use manual which lists each topic alphabetically, and has a comprehensive index which gives the reader quick access to the appropriate legislation. Fundamentally, it is not a ‘heavyweight’ legal publication but more in the way of a legal ‘ready reckoner’ (in the non-arithmetic sense, so you can breathe a sigh of relief!) where each topic points to those parts of a statute which is appropriate to the topic, and it summarises effectively what the law contains in each relevant Act.

There will be critics of this little book, which is really a manual or guide, but I am not one of them. It is long overdue for the ‘community’ book market and a welcome friend to it. With so much going on at street level in our society, it is not surprising that areas of contention arise from street usage. Enter ‘Street Use and the Law’ as the first point of reference for all legal issues arising from street law and pavements politics so favoured by one particular party. Paul Clayden covers issues of liability in relation to the responsibilities of local government well and he examines the duties of local authorities to ensure the well-being and safety of all road users. It could well become the pavement politicians ‘bible’ for its statement of the law.

The Contents

The book has just over 160 pages covering such topics as what laws apply if fairground attractions obstruct traffic; if a dangerous dog is allowed to roam the streets without a muzzle; if a drain which overflows has led to dangerous amounts of surface water; and the ever-present nuisance of the abandoned shopping trolley. The book deals with these and many other numerous types of potential danger and public nuisance which make up everyday, mundane but nevertheless, important, issues for local people.

The contents cover: abandoned vehicles; advertisements; alcohol consumption in public places and drunkenness; anti-social behaviour; banners; begging; betting and gaming; bicycles; bus shelters; byelaws; closed circuit television and speed cameras; the community support officer; crossings; deliveries of goods; disabled persons; diversions and street closures; dog control and dog fouling; drainage of highways; excavations and deposit of material in street; forecourts; gates, walls and fences; graffiti; hedges; hoardings; ice and snow; invalid carriages; licensed premises; lighting; litter; noise; obstructions; parking; pavements and footways; processions and assemblies; public conveniences; road humps and other traffic calming measures; road traffic regulations; ropes and wires; scaffolding; skateboarding and roller-skating; skips; statutory nuisances; street collections; street trading; street works; tramways; trolley vehicle systems and guided transport systems; trees; and trolleys.

Warning! Warning!

There is a word of warning, though! Do not fall into the trap that so many laymen fall into that this book is an antidote to all the wrongs that befall road usage. It is not a replacement for the very detailed expositions of case law and statute law to be found in a law library or by visiting a costly lawyer for advice.

Paul Clayden does say in his Preface that for a fuller exposition of the law reference should be made to legal textbooks or other specialist legal publications. The Preface also contains useful definitions (perhaps it should be re-named a ‘glossary of terms’!) Clayden has also included guidance and/or directions which are contained in the ever-increasing ministerial circulars and publications by government departments and other bodies. The internet is the key to such information although there are no internet links given in this work so the reader will need to use [...].

We described this guide to street law as unique because it brings together all the problem causes me and my colleagues have faced and currently face as elected local councillors. We see it as a ‘must have’ book for local environmental pressure groups and community or residents association. We can finish where the author, Paul Clayden, begins when he writes: “whilst not specifically restricted to streets in urban areas, the topics covered are likely to be of greater relevance in such areas rather than in rural areas”.

Having represented people in both types of areas on different local authority over the last 25 years, we fully concur: this is a fine manual for the concerned environmentalist and street user.
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