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Street Fighter [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

4.4 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews


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Product details

  • Language: English
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005BGP0
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 493,431 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)
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Customer reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top customer reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
What knocked me out is that the centre of this exploitative, ultra-violent, B-movie there’s a layered, intricate, mercenary anti-hero – a great performance from Chiba, who does his complex character justice. There’s a whole lot of playing on the mystique of Karate (techniques, block breaking, showboating, large-scale training etc), and more generally the exotic east. The fights and clever stunts are all mighty-fine from the opening through to the ‘boss fights’, and knockout ending: although most are accompanied by some peculiar primal/pneumatic sounds and facial expressions on Chiba’s part.

The story’s simple but effective and contains some surprisingly dark and seedy aspects – assassins, mafia, firing squads, prostitution – pretty hard stuff for this era. The direction is also top-rate: stylish and flashy when it needs to be, and no-nonsense handling of the action scenes. Put it all together and this is quite simple a masterpiece in Kung-Fu cinema – blood, guts and tons of action that still feels both shocking and brutal 40 years on. The Street Fighter is an absolute must-see for all fans of action cinema.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
There's not much to say about the films themselves - those familiar with Chiba's work will already know all about them, and for those who aren't - this trilogy is well worth you money. All three films are uncut, digitally remastered and feature anamorphic 2.35:1 AR, original Japanese audio (in Stereo 2.0) with great English subtitles. Special features include the theatrical trailers for each film.

Overall, Optimum Asia did a fantastic job on restoring these brilliant films.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This DVD has been ordered by me for my dad, he requested it so I am sure he will enjoy it. The delivery was extremely prompt
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Brutal and disgusting in parts (don't let kids watch) but quite entertaining. Japanese language with English subtitles. Laughed hysterically at how Sonny Chiba's character dealt with the would-be rapist!
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Format: DVD
Tsurugi is a martial arts expert who sells his skills to the highest bidder. When he is hired to kidnap a young girl so the Mafia can get their hands on her business. He refuses when they don't pay him enough money. In retaliation he decides to go to the girl and offer his services in protecting her.

This is the film that that cemented Sonny Chiba as one of the most memorizing and intimidating screen persona's to ever come out of Japan. After the huge success of King Boxer with Lo Leih in 1972 and Enter the Dragon with Bruce Lee in 1973, production company Toei decided to cash in on their own martial arts epic.

Instead of the heroic lead they opted to go for a real anti hero in Tsurugi. He has a love for money and no respect for women, in after a client cannot afford to pay for his services he forces himself on the mans sister. Not something Bruce Lee or Lo Leih would've done. Tsurugi shows very little emotion throughout the film, except anger. Only when his close friend and partner Rakuda is killed do we see a softer side to him.

The fight scenes are well choreographed and brutal. They don't look as fluid as the visually appealing as ones Shaw Brothers were churning out at the time but I don't think that was the style they were going for. They instead go for a more gritty look. What stands out to me was the gore, we get eyes gouged, broken arms, throats ripped out and in one memorable moment he removes a would be rapists balls. The film is great as Chiba fights his way through a horde of bad guys on a cargo ship until the rain drench finale.

The score has a great upbeat theme tune and then an intense emotional piece, which was used on Rakuda's death scene.

Overall a very enjoyable film that spawned various sequels.
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By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 22 July 2010
Format: DVD
The biggest problem with The Street Fighter is that Sonny Chiba's violent protagonist is an utter scumbag who's no better than the villains, leaving no-one to root for, which rather reduces it to sitting back and waiting for the next fight between two sides of equally bad guys. How bad is Chiba? When his clients ask for more time to pay for a prison escape he arranges, he kills the brother and sells the sister to a bunch of rapists to make up what they owe him. The only thing the film offers in mitigation is seeing his father killed by the Japanese during the war, which doesn't really cut it (and if you're planning on seeing all three films, you'll be seeing a lot of that scene). Even when he fights on the right side, it's with the intention on getting a little payback on the mafia and maybe kidnapping the girl he's tasked to protect himself. Which more or less leaves the film to stand or fall on the strength of its many no-holds barred action scenes.

Unlike Hong Kong martial arts films this isn't about the elegance or discipline of the moves or the moral philosophy - it's all about the violence, as brutally over the top ultraviolent as only the 70s could be. A rapist has his penis and scrotum ripped off, one skull smash is shown in x-ray and Chiba proves adept at ripping out any number of bad guys internal organs while much unconvincing stage blood flows. It's the sheer so-far-over-the-top-it-practically-circumnavigates-the-world-twice nature of the violence that makes it seem less offensive than it should, or you suspect, wants to be.
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