Buy Used
£3.98
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Dispatched from the US -- Expect delivery in 2-3 weeks. Former Library books. Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Stray Bullets Volume 1 (Stray Bullets (Graphic Novels)) Paperback – 20 Apr 2005

4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle & comiXology
"Please retry"
Paperback, 20 Apr 2005
£17.97 £3.98
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: El Capitan (20 April 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0972714561
  • ISBN-13: 978-0972714563
  • Product Dimensions: 25.9 x 17 x 1.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,356,237 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Stray Bullets is absolutely ace, ever since I picked up a copy in my library I've been desperate to read more. I'm not a big fan of crime in general, but I do like good comics, and these are some of the best I've read. David Lapham's art and narrative are marvellous, conveying so much meaning. Not a word nor line is out of place.
Each story stands alone, so they could easily be read out of order, or seperately, but strands and characters are related, creating a bigger picture. This volume collects the first 7 comics, comprising one story 'arc'. The publishing quality is very nice, and the book has a pleasant weightiness to it.
I have nothing bad to say about this book.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
It’s tricky to talk about Stray Bullets without acknowledging Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction, which came out the year before Stray Bullets debuted in 1995. The clever dialogue, likeable criminal characters, and violent, interlocking stories must’ve felt derivative like the million Tarantino copycats that popped up in his wake. And yet Stray Bullets is its own thing. It shares only superficial similarities to Tarantino’s masterpiece and possesses notable differences to make it stand out separately.

Innocence of Nihilism collects the first seven stories in the series. It opens in 1997 where a couple of lowlifes are looking for a spot to bury a body before things go to hell and they shoot up a diner. From that explosive beginning, we’re thrown back to 1977 where we meet Ginny, a young girl who witnesses a brutal murder in an alleyway. The stories then jump ahead to different years, 1980, 81, and 82, featuring new characters like Spanish Scott, a charismatic killer, and Orson, a high school kid whose entrance into adulthood is something of a shock.

Pulp Fiction took place over a day or two while Stray Bullets is set over at least a couple decades. Also, while I admire Tarantino’s work, I don’t think he writes real characters – they always come off as cartoons, so that when something emotional happens to them, it never affects the viewer. With David Lapham’s stories, you do feel an emotional connection with some of the characters, especially with Ginny, who we see change after seeing the murder.

Ginny’s mind begins to unravel, her relationship with her mother falls apart, she tries running away, she stabs a kid at school with a pen, and then we see her beloved father contract cancer.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
A series of black and white violent stories, all inter-connected, jumping about from one time period to another.

There’s a fair amount of violence, some of it mindless. The stories are all connected but zap aback and forth in time. If this is not read in one go, it’s difficult to remember where everyone fits in because of the flashbacks and flash-forwards.

Quite entertaining but not really my cup of tea.

Recommended to those who like comics about hard living.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9aa04618) out of 5 stars 8 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9a50a1b0) out of 5 stars An excellent collection of loosely connected stories 21 Jan. 2015
By Alt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The stories collected in Stray Bullets (a cool title despite a pretentious subtitle that is best ignored) are loosely related to each other. They are generally set in the early 1980s.

A flat tire in the middle of the night can cause all kinds of problems when you need to move a dead body to get at the spare. One thing leads to another and pretty soon there's a killing spree. It's hard to put the blame all on one person but the dim-witted guy would get most of it. The strange thing is (as you might guess from the title), "The Look of Love" turns out to be a very warped love story. "Victimology," about a little girl whose life changes for the worse after she witnesses a crime, is promising for awhile but leads to a ho-hum ending.

"The Party" is a cool story about a bunch of petty criminals who all seem to work for, and fear, a guy named Harry. They manage to mess up pretty much every crime they commit, causing generalized mayhem in the process. The ensemble cast is carefully developed. The story ends abruptly but it's engrossing. If it had an actual ending, it would make a good movie.

"Bonnie and Clyde" is a weak story of misdirection that, at least initially, appears to be about a child molester. The art is great; the story falls flat.

A much better story is "Backin Up the Truck," about a boy, just turning 18, who meets a cougarish older woman at the same time he witnesses a guy being run over by a truck. All of those events come together to change his life. She throws him a birthday party and who should show up but ... the same thugs from "The Party."

In the funniest story, "How I Spent My Summer Vacation," a girl in a coma is hooked up to a Truth Machine and tells the truth about God which, of course, nobody wants to hear. The final entry, "Freedom!," about a young girl dealing with a tragic event, is a complete departure from the others but it is the most moving story in the book.

The art, like the writing, is detailed and imaginative. On the whole, despite a couple of minor missteps that are easily overlooked, this is an excellent example of graphic storytelling.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9a50a204) out of 5 stars Will stick with you long after you're done reading. 23 May 2010
By Kauffinbauchser - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There are no superheroes here. There's not really any heroes of any kind. The book is in simple black and white, but the characters are emotionally very grey. This collection introduces us to a world of dingy, low level criminals in Baltimore. Lapham avoids the obvious trappings of the genre. Instead of cruel criminals, who enjoy inflicting misery and pain, the cast of Stray Bullets seems to be in the business they're in to make a living. Instead of evil, these folks seem to be moral nihilists. I can't explain why, but these characters resonated with me, not just while I read, but for weeks after. One of the very best trades I've read ever.
HASH(0x9b82b078) out of 5 stars Dark page-turner 9 Sept. 2015
By Susan (Arizona) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Really good but so, so dark. I picked it up and read it late into the night until I could barely keep my eyes open then had to dig around and find something happy to rinse my brain before I went to sleep. Unlike Ed Brubaker's Criminal in which mostly bad people do bad things and get what's coming to them, Stray Bullets is filled with the suffering and/or deaths of innocents and innocent bystanders. Stray Bullets is a really appropriate title. There is some dark humor, or at least absurdity. There are some good twists--and I'm glad I didn't read all these Amazon reviews because some really articulate reviewers dropped a few slight spoilers. I recommend that you block everything you read about the book until after you're finished with it.

Toward the end of the book, there is a freestanding story about super-criminal Amy Racecar and I admit that I didn't understand that Amy is a story within the story and is meant to be a character created by the little girl, Virginia Applejack. Amy's gleeful, over-the-top violence comes at exactly the right time and is a bit of a respite before the reader has to deal with the sadness of the last chapter (I don't think it's a spoiler to say this one doesn't have a happy ending).

If you enjoy crime comics, I strongly recommend you check out Stray Bullets. It's deservedly an Eisner winner and the real crime (sorry; bad word play) is that there aren't more reviews of it--I think it's just that it's an older title. It's got some substance to it, though, and I think it would bear a re-read, if I could subject myself to those sad, grisly scenes again. That's not meant to be faint praise but I can't really gush about a comic that heavily and effectively features a little girl who suffers a massive amount of trauma. Which doesn't mean you shouldn't read it; it's really good. But you will not be throwing this in your beach bag with the Lumberjanes.
HASH(0x9a50a48c) out of 5 stars Great art with stories that are gritty, violent and at times darkly funny 21 Nov. 2014
By Wayne A McCoy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
'Stray Bullets, Vol. 1: Innocence of Nihilism' collects the first seven issues of the series from the mid 1990s by David Lapham. The art is great and the well written stories veer crazily out of control between morbid humor and outright violence. Ready?

The stories take place over a variety of years and a few of them are linked. From low lifes sent out to bury bodies, to an innocent young girl who's life is changed when she witnesses a murder. Things take place at a crazy party where a bright young man gets in with the wrong crowd. There is even a story about Amy Racecar, notorious bank robber and tall tale spinner.

The characters are memorable, even when they are less than savory. The art is black and white, but really good. I liked 'Murder Me Dead' for it's noir quality, and I like this one for it's similarities to the movie Pulp Fiction by Quentin Tarantino. I think it's a fair comparison and a compliment to the author. Gritty and enjoyable.

I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Diamond Book Distributors, Image Comics and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this great graphic novel.
HASH(0x9a50a63c) out of 5 stars Black-and-white comic collection 7 Dec. 2014
By PaulAllard - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A series of black and white violent stories, all inter-connected, jumping about from one time period to another.

There’s a fair amount of violence, some of it mindless. The stories are all connected but zap aback and forth in time. If this is not read in one go, it’s difficult to remember where everyone fits in because of the flashbacks and flash-forwards.

Quite entertaining but not really my cup of tea.

Recommended to those who like comics about hard living.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback