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Straight Shooter
 
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Straight Shooter

15 Jun. 2009 | Format: MP3

£3.99 (VAT included if applicable)
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4.7 out of 5 stars
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By 9ftneil VINE VOICE on 18 Aug. 2006
Format: Audio CD
Ignore the previous reviewer's comments this is Bad Company at their very best and easily compares with their stunning debut. Like that debut this 1975 follow up is chock full of classics from the stomping Good Lovin' Gone Bad, the bump n' grind sweatfest of Feel Like Makin' Love (surely one of Rock's horniest paeans to the horizontal art), raw Blues/Rock of Deal With The Preacher and Mick Ralph's mesmerising slide riffs on the scorching Wild Fire Woman. With Paul Rodgers amazing soulful vocals, Mick Ralph's tasty and economic riffs, Simon Kirke's rock solid drums and Boz Burrel's sinuous bass lines this album cemented Bad Co's position as peerless blues/rock giants who took up that mantle after Led Zep's more experimental forays (Houses of the Holy, Physical Graffiti) saw them moving away into more prog flavoured waters. With Bad Co what you get is no frills, no fuss, no histrionics and no flabby excess just pure stonking blues filled whiskey soaked rock with great melodies and incredible hooks. The albums highlight is undoubtedly Shooting Star an epic tale of a guitar gunslinger who hits the big time only to die tragically - considering Rodgers' old sparring partner in Free Paul Kossoff died less than a year after this album's release it now seems oddly prophetic and would stand as the perfect eulogy on the great Koss's extraordinary talents. The sweet honky tonk of Weep No More with it's acoustic guitar and orchestral strings is simple and emotional with none of that cloying sentimental cheesiness that affects rock bands when they go for a hit ballad (Whitesnake anyone?). Likewise the soulful Anna and Call On Me, with it's tasteful keys, recall the stunning ballads of Rodgers previous band Free and so make this album a perfect package - and a firm fan with female rockers too.Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
For many fans of classic rock, a reissue programme of Bad Company's work is long overdue. Therefore, it is all the more encouraging to discover that the band's first two albums have been given such satisfying overhauls at last. I have owned both of these albums on vinyl for some years and each one is great but, if I had to make a choice between them, i would say STRAIGHT SHOOTER (1975) just has the edge over the self-titled debut.

Featuring singer Paul Rodgers and drummer Simon kirks from Free, guitarist Mick Ralphs from Mott The Hoople and bassist Boz Burrell, late of progressive rockers King Crimson, Bad Company coalesced in late 1973, cut a deal with Led Zeppelin's fledgling Swan Song Records and released a self-titled debut album in 1974 that was tailor-made for global success. Spearheaded by the Ralphs-penned single 'Can't Get Enough', the album topped the charts in America and made the Top Three here in the UK. A round of sell-out touring thus found the band brimming with confidence as they ventured to Clearwell Castle with assistance from Ronnie Lane's in-demand mobile studio to record what would become STRAIGHT SHOOTER in late 1974. And sure enough, this second long-player was another slice of excellence.

This time around, Mick Ralphs delivered an equally muscular opening gambit in 'Good Lovin' Gone Bad', while incomparably soulful vocalist Paul Rodgers came up with possibly one of his finest ever songs in 'Shooting Star'. Notably too, drummer Simon Kirke offered up two compositions of sensitivity in the lilting shuffle of 'Weep No More' and the ballad 'Anna'.
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Format: Audio CD
Many would agree that this album represents Bad Company at their most confident. Does that translate to quality? I say it does. This is their greatest achievement.

Contrary to popular belief, this was not a copy of the first BC album. SS is sassier, heavier, and more consistent, viz:

Good Lovin' Gone Bad - It may have those Ralphs trademarks, but is certainly not a Can't Get Enough clone. For a start, it was never a Mott the Hoople song! (CGE actually dates from 1970, when MtH were an Island Band.) This is tough hard rock at its most memorable, and crunchy.

Feel Like Making Love - A unique (apart from track 4) mix of acoustic wistfulness and heavy rock fire. Outrageous, in a nice way. And who can argue with THAT guitar solo?

Weep No More - A beautiful song that shows what a romantic Simon Kirke is. The other three make this a sublime moment too. Perfect.

Shooting Star - Structured like track 2, but still its own song. Simple but very effective. The heaviness that brings the song to its climax is again shocking amongst the country-esque charm of the verses.

Deal with the Preacher - Heavy and funky (hear Boz' clever bass-lines), with a great lyric about indecision over commitment. A great fave with the late Tommy Vance, bless him. One of Ralphs' greatest solos, rivalling Blackmore or Santana at the time.

Wildfire Women - The sort of laid-back heaviness that Bad Co excelled at. Slide guitar adds a certain musical menace. This shows Rodgers stretching out more than any other song I can think of. A gem.

Anna - Again Mr Kirke does the heartfelt thing. Possibly the most Free-like moment here. No flash, just feeling.

Call on Me - The perfect way to end an album.
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