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The Storyteller by [Tillotson, Sharon]
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The Storyteller Kindle Edition

3.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Length: 348 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1011 KB
  • Print Length: 348 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Two Moons (30 July 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003ZUYQJ8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,578,384 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Kindle Edition
The Storyteller by Sharon Tillotson is the spiritual and thought provoking tale of Suzy on her path to self discovery. After the death of her husband, Suzy is left trying to figure out who she is and what it is that she wants from life. Her business is doing the best it has done in years, she has reconnected with her two children, and all in all things are looking like they couldn't be better. Yet Suzy feels that something is missing, and through a series of self help seminars, she realizes what it is that she wants to do. She takes off to Africa to begin opening a foundation to help spread the message of ULove, or Universal Love.

The Storyteller jumps around in content, as the reader embarks on the journey of Sarah who is a Soul and is the guiding force in Suzy's life. Sarah happens to be a storyteller and tells about some of her previous reincarnations throughout different chapters. There were a few spots that seemed to be sluggish and were drawn out during the retelling of Sarah's reincarnations which were a little tiring at times. They quickly pick back up, especially in the telling of Suzy's story and it all comes together nicely. There are several thought provoking concepts throughout the book, and don't really follow one line of religion or the other. I found this refreshing because even though it is religious, the story doesn't follow just one path, which really helped prove the point of Universal Love. If you want a spiritual read that will make you sit back and re-examine your own life, then The Storyteller by Sharon Tillotson is for you.
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Format: Kindle Edition
For someone who is neither religious, nor very spiritual, it seems my reading material has leaned toward both recently. This book is heavy on the spirituality, but without the religion. Its structure is clever, with narration from a "soul" with interleaved stories of the people she has inhabited in multiple lives spent on earth. If you don't believe in reincarnation, but don't have strong beliefs against it, that part of the story shouldn't be any harder to buy into than most speculative fiction.

I've read a few other books like this, where multiple story lines were happening in different times in history, and found that I had a much stronger affinity for one of the story lines compared to the others. That wasn't true of The Storyteller. Although it was much easier to identify with Suzy, the character living in contemporary times, I didn't find myself wishing the other characters weren't there or that I could read through their sections faster. I also thought Tillotson did a very good job in making the voices of the different characters unique in a way that was a positive in reinforcing their differences in time, place, and experience. It was a different kind of story, with a positive message.

Where I had some difficulty was with some writing tics, a minor plot discrepancy, and a plot turn I thought broke what, if it isn't a rule, should be one. The plot discrepancy really was minor, at least to the story, when a store that was in Sausalito in the first half of the book was mystically transported several hundred miles south to Pasadena in the later half.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars 4 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Spiritual Journey of Reincarnation 9 Feb. 2013
By Sandra Nachlinger - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I had never thought much about reincarnation until I read THE STORYTELLER by Sharon Tillotson. Her book made me pause and consider the possibility.

The main story takes place in current day when a soul called Sarah tries to help Suzy, a recent widow, get on with her life and find her life's purpose. But Suzy is just one of the bodies Sarah has inhabited. Interwoven with Suzy's story are three other tales -- the first taking place in 10,000 BC in Eastern Europe; the second in 5,000 BC in what is now the southwestern United States; and the third during the time of Jesus. All of the stories captured my imagination and held my interest, and all of them combined to make a satisfying book.

Because this book was unlike any other I've read, I enjoyed the opportunity to learn something new, considering the idea of reincarnation and the philosophy behind it as presented by this author. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a spiritual (but not religious) saga.
3.0 out of 5 stars The Storyteller 29 May 2012
By BigAl - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
For someone who is neither religious, nor very spiritual, it seems my reading material has leaned toward both recently. This book is heavy on the spirituality, but without the religion. Its structure is clever, with narration from a "soul" with interleaved stories of the people she has inhabited in multiple lives spent on earth. If you don't believe in reincarnation, but don't have strong beliefs against it, that part of the story shouldn't be any harder to buy into than most speculative fiction.

I've read a few other books like this, where multiple story lines were happening in different times in history, and found that I had a much stronger affinity for one of the story lines compared to the others. That wasn't true of The Storyteller. Although it was much easier to identify with Suzy, the character living in contemporary times, I didn't find myself wishing the other characters weren't there or that I could read through their sections faster. I also thought Tillotson did a very good job in making the voices of the different characters unique in a way that was a positive in reinforcing their differences in time, place, and experience. It was a different kind of story, with a positive message.

Where I had some difficulty was with some writing tics, a minor plot discrepancy, and a plot turn I thought broke what, if it isn't a rule, should be one. The plot discrepancy really was minor, at least to the story, when a store that was in Sausalito in the first half of the book was mystically transported several hundred miles south to Pasadena in the later half.

The rule (at least in my mind) that was broken was when the main character, who had been mourning the death of her husband and been painting him by both her actions and thoughts as the perfect spouse, suddenly sprung some reasons why he might not have been. Misleading the other characters with words and actions is fine, but misleading the reader in her thoughts, not so much. It seemed like that author might have thought she needed this to justify one of the characters' actions. It wasn't.

The writing tic was one of those things that gave me pause the first time, but became an irritant by the end of the book. An example is in the sentence, "He was in charge of both marketing and human resources, he'd informed her on a laugh, ..." That "on a laugh" part (sometimes "on a smile"), was also used in dialog tags, in place of "he said" or "she said." While grammatically correct and better than some of the dialog tag misuses I've seen, trying to communicate a characters emotions this way too often feels forced, unnatural, and contrived, which is how it read to me. One final concern was a tendency for the main character to float off into daydream-land in the middle of a conversation. Normally the transitions when this happened worked out okay, but in at least once instance, it happened in the middle of dialog when she was asked a question. By the time she came back to the real world several long paragraphs later and answered, I'd lost track of the pending question.

**Originally written for "Books and Pals" book blog. May have received a free review copy. **
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A slow journey of discovery 4 Dec. 2010
By GraceKrispy (MotherLode blog) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
"Sarah" is a Soul who's been through many incarnations in many different times. Currently, she's trying to help guide Suzy, a modern-day widow with a business of her own and a seeming inability to move past her losses, on her path of rediscovery. While we watch Suzy traveling her path, Sarah recounts for us some of her past incarnations and subsequent lessons learned. Sarah is a Storyteller, and most of her incarnations have utilized that gift. Suzy, however, is yet to discover who she is and what her main purpose may be.

Sharon Tillotson, a life-long intuitive and seeker, was guided to craft this book to share this story. Several stories describing Sarah's past lives are interspersed throughout Suzy's journey of discovery, loosely tied together by Sarah's own "thoughts" on the issues. As I was first reading, I found myself wishing it had been a collection of short stories, "soul" stories, perhaps introduced by Sarah's thoughts about each one. Although it all pulls together into a cohesive piece, the stories of the various incarnations are long enough that it reads a bit more like a collection rather than a novel. Essentially, though, it is a collection, but with Suzy's story interwoven into the mix. As I continued reading, I began to enjoy more the format of the book. Some of the stories were much more engaging to me than others. It wasn't a book I devoured, eager to finish, it was a book I tasted in sips (hence my relatively long- for me- read time). Some of the sips were very satisfying and thought-provoking, others, not so much. For me, the book dragged a bit in places, even though none of the sections was particularly uninteresting. It was like a languid journey across a varied landscape, with some scenery more enjoyable than others. I felt like it took a while to get going and to get me engaged in the story, but as I settled down and began to enjoy the ride, it became more about the journey; Suzy's journey as well as, perhaps, my own.

As Suzy discovers (or rediscovers or reinvents or remembers) herself, many transcendental ideas are explored and grown. Some of the ideas were thought-provoking, and some seemed a bit tired. I did really like the concept of shining a flashlight; that there were no evil ideas, just darkness that needed a little extra light focused on it to be understood and explored. We can choose to shine that flashlight wherever our own personal darkness lies. I think Suzy's story dragged on in places, but that can be said to highlight her own struggle of rediscovery. Life doesn't always move quickly, at times it drags, and this book reflects that.

Altogether, an interesting read if you're in the mood for something thoughtful and unhurried. It's a bit difficult for me to rate with stars; I wasn't really immersed or engaged throughout, but it was fairly thought-provoking and interesting. The story is really designed for the reader to be a spectator rather than a participant and observe Suzy's journey and the journey of the Soul called Sarah. The participation comes as you reflect upon what it all means for you, if you choose to do so. Your rating will vary, but for me, it's a:

3 /5 stars @ MotherLode blog
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Spiritual and Thought Provoking 22 Feb. 2011
By Jaidis Shaw - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
The Storyteller by Sharon Tillotson is the spiritual and thought provoking tale of Suzy on her path to self discovery. After the death of her husband, Suzy is left trying to figure out who she is and what it is that she wants from life. Her business is doing the best it has done in years, she has reconnected with her two children, and all in all things are looking like they couldn't be better. Yet Suzy feels that something is missing, and through a series of self help seminars, she realizes what it is that she wants to do. She takes off to Africa to begin opening a foundation to help spread the message of ULove, or Universal Love.

The Storyteller jumps around in content, as the reader embarks on the journey of Sarah who is a Soul and is the guiding force in Suzy's life. Sarah happens to be a storyteller and tells about some of her previous reincarnations throughout different chapters. There were a few spots that seemed to be sluggish and were drawn out during the retelling of Sarah's reincarnations which were a little tiring at times. They quickly pick back up, especially in the telling of Suzy's story and it all comes together nicely. There are several thought provoking concepts throughout the book, and don't really follow one line of religion or the other. I found this refreshing because even though it is religious, the story doesn't follow just one path, which really helped prove the point of Universal Love. If you want a spiritual read that will make you sit back and re-examine your own life, then The Storyteller by Sharon Tillotson is for you.
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