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Stormwatch Limited Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews

Price: £38.38
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Product details

  • Audio CD (2 Jun. 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Limited Edition
  • Label: EMI
  • ASIN: B0000D8RVO
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 478,439 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. North Sea Oil
  2. Orion
  3. Home
  4. Dark Ages
  5. Warm Sporran
  6. Somethings On The Move
  7. Old Ghosts
  8. Dun Ringill
  9. Flying Dutchman
  10. Elegy

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
This is the great ignored Tull LP. Released amidst the chilly winds of the punk fall-out in the late 1970's, 'Stormwatch' is one of the Tull's more coherent and pertinent statements, both lyrically and musically. The vague concept about renewable resources, global climate change and political intervention is as relevant today as it was back then (the LP was released just as the UK began benefitting from - and squandering - the income raised from the oil fields in the North Sea). Songs such as 'Dark Ages', 'North Sea Oil' and 'Something On The Move' are all highly melodic, strong pieces, mercifully lacking the Tull lack of focus that sometimes made their songs a bit unwieldy. Here the band were right on top of their craft and Ian Anderson hadn't sung this convincingly for many a year.

It's not all strident either, 'Dun Ringil' is as beautiful as anything on 'Songs From the Wood' and the closing instrumental piece 'Elegy' is simply delightful. Indeed, there are so many great songs here, long time fans will particularly enjoy 'Orion' and 'The Flying Dutchman'.

It's time to replace that old vinyl, or to get to know a lost Tull classic.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Just like is predecessor, Heavy Horses, Stormwatch's original vinyl release was met largely with indifference - Tull were seen as a spent force, going backwards rathere than forwards. However, it isn't till you hear the remasters of their mid and late 70s albums that you appreciate their complexity. Much comes out that was missed before, the sound limitation of vinyl being the main factor in the way music was mixed in those days. I always refer to Stormwatch as Tull's "Scottish Album" - not because the concept is in any way scottish or even celtic, but because the musical styles involved typify the folk-rock scene north of the border - elements later taken up by Runrig. The two long tracks stand out immediately - Ian Anderson's vision never dulled, it was simply edited rather harshly at times - and a number of the shorter tracks were released as singles, without charting, they're a little too intelligent for 7-inch fodder. The bonus tracks have all come out on several previous collections, but always good to have them gathered as they were recorded during album sessions, and as is often the case, some of these passed-over tracks are actually as good if not better than those included on the album. All in all a very strong album in retrospect, melodic and musical and not relying solely on huffing down a flute, many different instrumental dimensions evolved during this period.
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Format: Audio CD
I have been listening to Jethro Tull regularly over the last 30 years, and have to say I like most of their massive back cataloge. If I was to pick one album though as 'the best Tull sound' it would have to be this stunner. Production, instrumentation and orchestration (to my ears) are superb. I have read much about Stormwatch, and I'm constantly surprised and disappointed at the bad press it generally gets - in my opinion hugely undeserved. It is such an underated album. I was fortunate to see this great line up on the Stormwatch tour, just two days before it broke up, and I remember sitting in the audience open mouthed in awe at the show in front of me! No other band has had that effect on me since. Back to the album, my personal favourite track is probably 'Flying Dutchman' atmospheric Scottish sounding with beautifull flute and mandolin and of course John Glascock's bass, but every track (original album) is wonderful. Other absolute stand outs are 'Old Ghosts' with it's brilliant baseline, 'Dark Ages' a 9 minute monster which I think contains the best sounding Tull rock passage from their entire cataloge (second guitar break), 'Home', as warm as sitting by the fire in your favourite slippers, 'Dun Ringill', most peoples favourite from this album, a beautiful acoustic piece, which indeed always transports me to the west coast of Scotland, and 'Orion', with it's infectious chorus. This also of course was the last album by Tull that included the amazing Barrimore Barlow on drums, plus John Evans, John Glascock and David Palmer. Such a shame that John Glascock died soon after this album was released, he only played on three tracks (Orion, Flying Dutchman and Elegy). Such a shame we couldn't have experienced another album with this band line up.Read more ›
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By A Customer on 22 Mar. 2004
Format: Audio CD
Stormwatch is an excellent if somewhat uneven album, the track in Dark Ages in particular being among the greatest Tull songs; brilliant lyrics with a musical play on the opening notes of Beethoven's (Anderson's favourite composer) 5th to indicate how far Britain was in the Winter of Discontent from the Enlightenment. (Of course, it is even further in these days' 'consumer haze'.) My problem with this album, both on vinyl and cd, was that it also sounded as though it had been recorded in the dark ages. All the tracks were muddy and lacking focus, warmth and bite. The remastered version rectifies this problem. The album now sounds massively better and well worth the £6.99 or so to hear properly.
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Format: Audio CD
In the 11 years from 1969 to 1979 Tull released 11 studio albums of original material written by main man Ian Anderson. That's right, 11 albums in 11 years- how many musicians would even attempt that nowadays? This album was the 11th so you would expect a dropping off of standards, right? Wrong. This is a superb album which is often overlooked in the Tull canon but which epitomises so much that was great about the Tull of the 70's.
Here you will find driving but always melodic rock alternating with gentler acoustic numbers, some with subtle orchestral backing that complements but never overwhelms the songs. A number of the songs display concern for environmental issues long before it became fashionable to do so.
This reissue includes bonus tracks including the single "A stitch in time" which, though worth having, were previously released on the "20 years of Jethro Tull" box set released in 1988; however since that box set is now only available at an extravagant price, this is the most sensible way to get these tracks nowadays.
Few people would suggest this as the album to start off a Tull collection with "Aqualung", "Songs from the Wood" or even "Thick as a Brick" being the likely candidates, but frankly I think a newcomer to Tull could do much worse than choose this as their starting point.
After this album there was a major shake up in the Tull line up with only the faithful Martin Barre on guitar remaining with Anderson for the next album "A" and Tull never sounded the same again; you could argue they never sounded this good again.
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