FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Storms Of Silence has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Storms Of Silence Paperback – 6 Feb 1997

4.3 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£10.99
£4.26 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£10.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Storms Of Silence
  • +
  • This Game Of Ghosts
  • +
  • Dark Shadows Falling
Total price: £31.97
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; New Ed edition (6 Feb. 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099578115
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099578116
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 339,906 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Excellent...Simpson is a born writer" (The Times)

"'To mix a metaphor, Joe Simpson is a streetwise mountaineer...He takes you close to the nitty-gritty, the nuts and bolts of professional climbing in the 1990's. He is used to dealing with totalitarian policemen. He is passionate and moving on the subject of Tibet and the agonies inflicted on it by the cruel Chinese occupation...Above all, Simpson is a born writer'" (Paul Johnson The Times)

"'The book's major theme is the nature of aggression. A skinhead in a Sheffield bar sets the reader up for the genocide that is modern Tibetan history...What makes Joe Simpson stand out is his belief that there is more to life than a crampon, and his dogged refusal to leave the highest mental peaks unclimbed'" (Sara Wheeler Daily Telegraph)

"'THis immensely accessible book offers a unique re-interpretation of masculinity...In doing so, it offers a ray of hope to an increasingly bleak and vicious society'" (Martin Booth Independent)

About the Author

Joe Simpson is the author of several best-selling books, of which the first, Touching the Void, won both the NCR Award and the Boardman Tasker Award. Touching the Void has become a classic and an international bestseller, translated into fourteen languages and made into an award-winning feature-length documentary film (winner of the Outstanding British Film of the Year BAFTA 2004). Joe currently lives in Sheffield.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Simpson is consistently proving himself to be not only an able (and by his own admission, extremely lucky!) mountaineer, but a skilful and passionate storyteller. In this, his third book, he moves beyond the relatively narrow sphere of his own mountain climbing adventures, gripping though they are, to take a more philosophical look at why people are drawn to adventure, how it affects them, and how modern-day "credit card adventuring" impacts both the environment and people it comes into contact with.
The book is vaguley episodic, covering periods in Simpson's own life and career, from his recovery from the horrific accident he described so vividly in Touching The Void, to his Greenpeace activities, as well as a more general discussion on the appalling human cost of China's invasion of Tibet. Simpson's often acerbic humour shines throughout, as does his refusal to shy away from the difficult questions. His style has grown more confident, and the range of material he tackles is often exceptional. A wonderful book.
Comment 48 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The overwhelming rollercoaster of mixed emotional feelings that Joe recalls in following those two young girls down a mountain track is the most beautiful writing and honest emotional descriptions I have ever read. The laughter, the courage, the fear, the playfulness, the concern, hurt and laughter make such an enduring impact, you cannot fail to examine your own qualities as a human being. Read it and reappraise your own life values.
Comment 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is one of my very favourite books- dog eared and coffee-cup stained from all of the times I have dived back in. There is so much here to treasure: Joe's humor, which is both dry and wondefully silly, his knack for making tragic events somehow understandable, and his bravery: both the physical and the mental kind. He brings up his own trouble with moral principles and personal yearnings, and makes it accessible, sad, and inspiring. It is more than a book about climbing, and more than a book for boys who want to head out for the great outdoors. It is fascinating, amusing, sobering, and totally essential for every type of reader .
Highly, highly reccommended.
Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I was touched by his honesty, the explorations into his motivations for climbing, for pushing himself, and also the things that drive his companions. As more and more of them are taken by the mountains...
Harrowing eye-opener about the plight of the people in Tibet. He writes with a passion and strange detachment when he encounters the boys along the paths.
This book made me look at how much we all are compatmentalising the plight of the people in far away countries. How much can we do just by raising the awarenss? Thanks very much to Joe for including his personal reactions to the political events.
It also cleared up some misconceptions I had about mountaineering. I thought that you would get all mushy about the closeness to nature, and the quiet and feel the awsome wonder of it all, hone your instincts etc, instead they are unaware of approaching avalances because the walkman is blaring out "White wedding...or some such stuff"
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I like Joe Simpsons books. I respect the man but there is a growing negative vibe that as someone who likes to dangle from a rope now and then puts me off a little.
Joe's morals are sound, I stand firmly in agreement with his views on the Chinese occupation of Tibet and on the desecration of the hill but when he talks of turning up his Sony walkman and storming off up a trail with his head down I can't help feel a little like I'd rather be reading something a little more upbeat that would make me WANT to get on the hill. The counter argument of course is that he is holding up a mirror to what mountaineering has become. However I can't help feel this was done a little more interestingly by John Krakauer in INTO THIN AIR (Think I got the correct title)

I wouldn't advise not reading this book but it doesn't enthuse me to get out there in the same way BONNINGTON, SMYTHE, KIRKPATRICK and even FEINNES' writings do. Perhaps this would be more relevant to a conscientious objector to modern mountaineering?
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Arrived well packaged up and in good time, thank you. Joe Simpson is a great writer, some mountain adventure writers are so tedious and technical, not Joe recommend any of his books to anyone, you don't have to be into mountains to fine them a great read. You might want to get into mountains after reading his books though
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Joe Simpson is attempting something interesting here. Storms of Silence is not so much about scaling remote peaks as what happens in the valleys, villages and camps below those peaks: the routes in, the people on them, and the experiences he's had in the many mountain ranges he's visited.

The action-filled pages of many hold-on-by-your-fingernail mountaineering writings often ignore the obvious fact that these mountains exist in countries where people live. In Simpson's famous Touching the Void the natives only get a mention towards the end of the book when Simpson and co crash land back in civilisation. Reading many mountain climbing accounts you could be forgiven for believing that mountaineers generally turn up at the bottom on a bus from the airport, before scaling their peaks and return home the same way.

Storms of Silence foregrounds the base camps, sherpas, travel routes and stories that mountaineers encounter before and after they go on their epic rock-scaling endeavours. There are some beautiful moments in here. In one chapter Simpson and his fellow climbers - acclimatising before scaling a peak on the Nepalese/ Tibetan border - encounter a bunch of Khampa refugees, fleeing away from Tibet. It's a vivid example that life in the mountains is a million miles from the experience of the Goretex-clad westerners who walk the same paths.

Sometimes the travel vignettes lack narrative thrust, and dissolve into mere observation, which is all very nice but can get a bit dull. But you can forgive Simpson this - he's obviously trying to move mountain writing away from page-turning accounts of extreme physical endeavour towards something a bit more, well, human.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback