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A Storm of Swords: Book 3 of A Song of Ice and Fire Audio Download – Unabridged

4.7 out of 5 stars 496 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 47 hours and 37 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers Limited
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 12 July 2011
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005G48XL8
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I was momentarily disappointed and puzzled to see that there's still only one customer review for ASoS, two years after its publication, but of course there's a good reason for this. The ASOIAF readers who are full of missionary zeal for the series (approximately 95% of the total readership, at a conservative estimate) are focusing their efforts on getting all their acquaintance to read the FIRST book of the series, not the third. They reckon, understandably, that their job is then done, and that any normal person will only need to know that the second and third books exist to be rushing out and acquiring them, and then be frustrated to fever pitch that they have to wait another half year till A Feast for Crows. It's a little difficult to say anything much about the later books without betraying spoiler information about the earlier ones - and these are books where surprise is crucial to the first reading experience. Which won't stop you REreading the books repeatedly and finding fresh delight in them each time.
So no spoilers here either. If by some chance you've read A Game of Thrones and A Clash of Kings but not this, then lose no further time. It is in my opinion the best yet - if only because it's the longest and so provides the reader with even more hours of pleasure than the earlier two! Another reason for my opinion is the sheer brilliance of what Martin does with one of the two new character viewpoints he introduces here. To say more would give away too much.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
The confrontation among the different candidates to the throne in this third book in the series is heating up, and the supernatural elements begin to have more and more relevance. Joffrey Baratheon is currently sitting as acting king, but there are several challengers to his power, including his “uncle” Stannis, Robb Stark, the king in the north, and the last of the Targaryen, Daenerys, who is coming with her three dragons! (Reader’s should thank Phyllis too for making Martin put in the dragons)
This setup, together with an abundance of interesting sub plots make this the most entertaining fantasy series I have ever encountered. For example, Jon Snow is beyond the wall in the north and has proven his loyalty to the wildlings by killing a brother. He is acting as a spy but without the rest of his brothers from the Night Watch knowing it, and while the Night Watch prepares to defend the wall against the wildlings and the Others (terrifying undead creatures), Jon needs to find a way to help them. But at the same time he needs to keep the wildlings’ trust and deal with the added inconvenience of love.
One of the characteristics that make this series so remarkable is that the author establishes extremely interesting situations in which the characters need to be extremely cunning to succeed in their quest. In this regard, one of my favorite characters is Tyrion Lannister, the Imp, who is a dwarf that was almost killed in the previous book and in the process was disfigured and left even uglier than he already was. He has only one weapon, his intelligence, and seeing him use it is a true pleasure. The fact that as happens with many other characters in the series, it is hard to determine if Tyrion is “good” or “bad”, makes him even more interesting.
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Format: Hardcover
The best heroic fantasy series in the world keeps getting better. Though nearly 1,000 pages long, I had the feeling that it could easily have been 500 pages longer. Complaints about the Bran and Arya chapters never popped into my head. Yes, they move less decisively than some other plotlines but they all do progress significantly near the end and there's some very good character interaction to keep us engrossed. But of course the main focus of the book is on the political fallout of the war between the Starks and the Lannisters, and what a fallout it is. I defy anyone to predict more than 25 % of Martin's plot twists, and when he DOES go for the more predictable resolution it is because it is the RIGHT one. Robb Stark is finally on stage again (his lack of presence was the main drawback of Clash Of Kings as far as I was concerned). Jaime Lannister develops incredibly well as a character, and Tyrion remains as magnetic as ever (slight caveat : a few too many mentions of how people stare at him even more since he was scarred). The magical subplot increases in strength, Stannis is an absolutely fascinating creation - a decent, stern hero who is unlikable. The religion of R'Hllor doesn't seem to be what we thought it was - or is it? The way the battle between Light And Dark will be fought (probably) in the next three books shapes up to be very interesting and frightening. In fact, this is one of the aspects I like very much in the series : behind the scenes, a true Evil is at work, yet the ones who might be able to halt its advance are busily exterminating each other over what amount to petty squabbles, greed and jealousy. A wonderful mix of real-life medieval politics and heroic-fantasy themes.Read more ›
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